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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Router
I'm not really into technology but this is how I found the Belken router and the difference with my old Netgear router which it has replaced. I'd been moaning on about the Netgear router `dropping the connection' several times each day for ages but all the men around (obviously knowing more about technology than I do) said no it's fine it will be because you live in a...
Published on 29 Dec 2011 by A. Rose

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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I feel silly for ordering!
I went for this item because I needed a 5GHz modem router and this one was cheap. I saw the very high proportion of one star reviews and thought I'd take the risk anyway. I felt rather smug for 24 hours as everything worked perfectly. Then everything stopped. I can't connect any devices to it anymore. I have rebooted, reset etc etc. I know what I'm doing with this sort of...
Published 24 months ago by Sally Fletch


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Router, 29 Dec 2011
By 
A. Rose (Devon & Menorca) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I'm not really into technology but this is how I found the Belken router and the difference with my old Netgear router which it has replaced. I'd been moaning on about the Netgear router `dropping the connection' several times each day for ages but all the men around (obviously knowing more about technology than I do) said no it's fine it will be because you live in a dodgy broadband area of Devon. I then installed the Belken router and to the amazement of the men and my `I told you so' it has worked perfectly without `dropping the connection' for the last four weeks.

The installation was simple and I did it all wirelessly rather than connecting to the router which suited me perfectly as there is no phone line near my computer. The installation wizard did ask for VCI and VPI numbers which can be supplied by your Service Provider which puzzled me for a while as I didn't want to make a call to my Service Provider. The men scratched their heads and said they'd never come across that before when installing a modem so I went back to the original Netgear router and jotted down the settings, put the same numbers in the Belken set-up and hey presto, all connected and working. I notice that none of the other reviewers have mentioned this so maybe it's a Tiscali / TalkTalk thing. Personal settings of passwords etc is easy to do and segregates between `user' and `guests'.

I'm not very techy and I don't play computer games so don't know whether it has made any difference to connection speed but I certainly don't have any problems with Facebook or FarmVille ! One thing that did happen, but not sure if it's the change of router or a program update, is that I can now share photos between my PC and laptop which is great for showing friends photos without having to stand around the PC.

All in all I am very pleased with this Belken router. It performs perfectly and even though it's crammed between a wardrobe and a wall, all the house has good strong connection although a house any larger than a large four bedroomed might be advised to get one with a longer range.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I feel silly for ordering!, 7 Sep 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Belkin Wireless N600 Modem Router ADSL (BT Line) (Electronics)
I went for this item because I needed a 5GHz modem router and this one was cheap. I saw the very high proportion of one star reviews and thought I'd take the risk anyway. I felt rather smug for 24 hours as everything worked perfectly. Then everything stopped. I can't connect any devices to it anymore. I have rebooted, reset etc etc. I know what I'm doing with this sort of stuff. It's dead. It's going back on Monday and I'm going to spend a little more to get something that will work for longer than a day.

Lesson for today? When a shedload of people have a one star experience, the chances are you'll have one too.

Note to Amazon - There is clearly a significant problem with this item. Surely the sensible thing to do would be to withdraw it from sale!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great router, hopeless design, 30 Jan 2012
By 
Mr Gumby "DH" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Belkin Wireless N600 Modem Router ADSL (BT Line) (Electronics)
This does the basics very well - range and speed are excellent, and, so far, it's been 100% stable.

It's dual-band (great as long as your devices have 5GHz support), offers a USB port for printer or storage and ability to set up a guest network. I like being able to power the wireless down automatically overnight to reduce power consumption. If you need two ports or gigabit Ethernet, go for the N750.

You don't have to install the software if you're comfortable configuring the router manually and don't want to use the USB port (see below). It's easily configured through the web interface (192.168.2.1, default password blank). I'm using mine with a static ip address on O2 and configuration was straightforward without reference to the manual.

One thing that bugs me beyond reason is that the mains lead is shorter than any other router I've owned, so I have to use an extension lead. The supplied lead is more than a metre, probably about 1.2m or even a little more, but not long enough to reach the location occupied by my last 3 or 4 routers. A longer lead would have cost pennies, if that. I'd solder an extra piece into the lead but that would reduce the router's second-hand value.

The vertical design is hopeless, as far as I'm concerned. It's lightweight and cables attached up the back of it make it very unstable. And then there's the gloss black finish which is bound to get smudged and scratched. Give me a good solid brick, every time, even if it does mean external antennae.

As for the "apps", there's little to them. As far as I can see, Self-Healing just lets you schedule a periodic automatic restart and maybe initiates a restart automatically if problems are detected. Memory Safe is a simple backup tool to copy files to USB storage. Print Zone presumably is just the ability to attach a printer to the router. And Video Mover "sends media from a USB drive attached to your Router to any UPnP or DLNA-compatible device on your network". Apart from scheduled restart, I think all those require installation of the Belkin s/w - has to be on all devices wanting to print to the attached printer.

Overall, I'm very happy with my purchase and only wish it had a more practical shape and finish (and a longer mains lead!).
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's a good thing I have as much patience as I do..., 25 Nov 2011
By 
Mr. Mischief (Guernsey) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
First impressions of the Belkin N300 were fairly favourable - it's not going to win any design or prettiness awards but it also won't look too out of place next to your PC or AV equipment. It does have a very `plastic-y' sound to it, though, and it doesn't feel particularly substantial. Ignoring the aesthetics for a moment, with the router you get a short Ethernet cable, a short telephone cable, a phone line filter and a CD with the router's set-up software and manuals on.

The front of the router gives you precious little in the way of information - there's a combined power/connection light and a separate WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup) button that you'll probably never use, but that's it. There are no status lights for the Ethernet connections, and no lights to give an indication of the DSL or the wireless security status. The router is also minus a power button so unplugging it from the mains is the only way to turn it off. The Ethernet and DSL status is of little concern to me, but I did miss the wireless security status light, having had it on my two previous routers. The power/connection light is also very bright but Belkin helpfully provide a way of dimming it in the router's configuration settings, if you want to use it in the bedroom, for example.

When it came to actually using the thing, connecting the router to my ISP was a protracted and somewhat painful experience. The auto-set-up feature on the CD was easy to understand but the router was unable to connect to my ISP automatically, so I had to input certain settings myself - I would strongly recommend that you have ALL of your ISP's connection settings (particularly the VPI and VCI numbers) handy before you start the process. Even with these settings, it still took two hours of shouting, several erroneous `wrong settings' messages, and numerous program restarts to make a connection, and I have to admit that at that point I was very close to giving up on it and going back to my old router.

But persevere I did, and once set up, the N300 proved sturdy and reliable, when used with a wired connection; wirelessly, things were a bit different. My old Samsung mobile (which could only ever connect to my old router when they were in the same room!) connected to the Belkin first time, from two solid-block rooms away, but my XP home PC (again, two rooms away) returned a weaker signal and slower connection speed than it had done previously. My 18-month-old Windows 7 laptop was completely unable to connect, returning a `faulty wireless adapter' notification whenever I tried. Some mucking about with the settings later - culminating in me changing the bandwidth from 20 to 20/40 MHz - and it did manage to connect, but the process wasn't the sort of thing I would ever want any of my elderly or less tech-savvy relatives to have to cope with.

The N300 uses what Belkin call their `MultiBeam antenna technology', which they say gives "...a powerful signal strength and maximum coverage so you can connect from multiple devices, virtually anywhere in your home." While it's true that I was able to connect from more areas of my house than I had been able to before, the signal strength in some areas was diminished, indicating that the Belkin may be throwing the available signal around more, rather than increasing it in any meaningful way. The N300 has an internal, rather than a protruding, antenna, and this may have contributed to the weaker signal that I was getting - it would be interesting to see if an external antenna would fare better. Most of my machines are `wireless g' capable only, although I did add a `wireless n' adaptor to my home PC, which nicely boosted the connection speed to a very noticeable 108 Mbps but had no discernable effect on the signal strength.

If you want to play around with the N300's various settings, you access them through your internet browser, initially from the included set-up CD and thereafter directly via a bookmark that you can add manually. At first the range of settings on offer might be slightly bewildering for those of a nervous disposition, but the reality is that (a) you'll never use most of them, and (b) the router is already configured the way the majority of users would expect, so you only need tinker if you want to. I would recommend setting up a log-in password, checking that the wireless configuration is optimal, and maybe changing the WEP key, but in my case most of the other things appeared to be already configured as I would have wanted them.

The two utilities available that you may find handy, are `Self Healing' and `ECO Mode'. Self Healing reinitialises the router at set times during the week (usually in the middle of the night on certain days) to clear the memory and help keep the router running smoothly. ECO Mode allows you to disable the wireless radio, again at set times, to conserve power. Neither is particularly groundbreaking but both show that some thought has gone into the device and each is nice to have.

Forcing me to go through its setup procedure was definitely not the best way for the N300 to start our relationship, and if I had been blessed with only slightly less patience then it's a relationship that wouldn't have lasted. Fortunately, I persevered and was rewarded with a faster, if not quite as solid, connection to my home PC, plus a mobile phone that now feels the Wi-Fi love more than it ever did before. The N300 is plainly at the lower end of the Belkin router range, and I would have preferred to have one with spiffy lights, dual-band networking and maybe a USB port or two, but that's not what it's about. If you can actually get it set up and connected, then you've pretty much won the day, but you may find getting to that point not as simple or as pain-free as it perhaps should be.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Potentially clever, if the firmware is updated., 13 Dec 2012
By 
Daniel Wright (Doncaster, S.Yorks, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
OK first things first, this product seems to be listed at prices ranging from 115 to 250. I bought it for 40 by pre-ordering while Amazon were waiting for stock. For the price I paid this is a decent router + modem combination, for the prices currently being asked - not so much.

The router itself looks good. Somewhat unusually Belkin have decided to fit the ADSL modem not inside the router casing as you would expect but inside the power plug. This results in quite a bulky and ugly wall-wart if that is a concern for you (it is not for me). This separation of modem and router also leads to something I shall go into greater detail about later, the router and modem can be rebooted independently of each other.
The wireless signal seems to be pretty good, I live in an old house with solid brick internal walls and the signal drop-off is significant but a vast improvement on my old netgear in the 2.4 GHz band. Hopefully I shall acquire some 5 GHz kit soon.
Set-up was straight forward I simply used a wired connection to navigate to [...] which is the default router address. The management web-page is a bit cluttered and changes seem to take a long time to apply (10s to change DNS servers, 60s to change the default address range). Once I had put in my ISP details the web page alerted me that new firmware was available for the router. I downloaded and applied this, I also applied the update to the modem firmware that I was not alerted to. Hopefully future firmware updates will add a feature to alert the user to modem updates as well. Set-up from the web browser is your only option if you run linux, but then again it's usually the best way of setting up a router anyway. Incidentally if you are connecting from a server the web page fails to load in text-mode browsers (lynx, elinks, links2).
In the interests of writing a decent review I booted windows and actually gave the bundled software a try. It didn't get off to a good start when the CD installed adobe reader without asking and without need since I already have sumatraPDF when booting windows. The system tray app seems inoffensive though mostly it just opens up a browser on the relevant management page. The install assistant however is a nuisance, for some reason it refuses to accept that the network and internet are already set-up, and this silly little program insists on running every time you start the sys-tray app. Possibly if you are uncomfortable with setting up a router then this hand-holdy assistant will be useful - but then I doubt you'll be dropping the 100+ now being asked for what is essentially early adopter wireless ac kit. For the likely audience my advice is to open the box and throw the CD straight into the coaster drawer.

Now for some of the problems - the modem seems a bit unstable and will occasionally drop the internet connection, but then it sometimes takes a week or so for a line and modem to figure each other out. The router management web page has an option to reboot the router, but that is all it does, it reboots the router and not the modem - it took me a while to figure that out. The management page has no option to send a reboot signal to the modem - a major oversight that would be very useful and hopefully a future firmware will enable such an option. This means you have to physically go over and reset the modem, and the little red reset button is so fiddly to press that what you will actually end up doing is pulling the plug out waiting 15 seconds or so and plugging it back in - thereby forcing a router reboot as well and denying yourself the option of continuing to use your local network while your internet connection resets.
The DLNA server built in is not very good. It seems to only remember the state of any USB storage you attach as it was at the time you attached it, if you add or delete files to the network attached storage (the samba implementation seems fine) then the dlna server will ignore these changes (but again the samba share shows the changes just fine). So if dlna is important to you then unless a future firmware improves things you have the choice of either rebooting the router or unplugging and re-plugging the storage to get your changes to show up.

All in all for the price I paid this is a good router with a mediocre modem (if the current modem doesn't settle down I may just set up my old netgear modem/router as a modem only). For the price currently being asked, well unless you are one of the 5 people on earth with ac wireless kit I'd steer clear for now.

Update - as anticipated the modem has now settled down and is maintaining a good connection.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Can't complain., 19 Jan 2012
By 
Mr. A. L. Cooper "drunken_munkey" (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The Belkin N450 Modem Router is a complete hardware package designed to directly replace your BT or Virgin or other internet provider modem router. This means you can literally do away with that cheaply-made piece of plastic that was given to you complimentary with the subscription and upgrade to something better.

At least, that's what is hoped for.

Ok, so the negative first: this doesn't feel very well built. In fact, after only recently changing to a BT broadband package I was very impressed by the quality of the router supplied, and very disappointed with the Belkin N450 which I received not long after. The router given to us by BT just felt a lot more solid and had a very useful removable tab on the back which had on it the router's security key. The Belkin N450 had a piece of paper stuck to the bottom of the thin-as-you-like plastic base which I'm sure will eventually fall off after getting a kick or two. Not great. The setup was also a bit of a pain: in order to connect to our BT line, it required 2 numbers in order to connect up, neither of which I had a clue about. After a little search on the internet I found out the numbers are 38 and 0. Don't ask me why. For someone who likes to just turn something on and expect it to work, this didn't bode well with me. Hopefully if you use BT for your internet provider, those 2 numbers will work. Hopefully.

These niggles aside however, the N450 is actually not a bad router at all, once it's set up correctly. In fact, as it's got 2 transmitter/receivers built in (2.4GHz and 5GHz), this is very handy if you've got more than one computer/device to connect wirelessly (assuming some are on 2.4GHz and some are on 5GHz). If you have an Apple iMac or MacBook for instance, most of the newer ones can use 5GHz wireless, whereas I've tried a couple of new Windows laptops and both use 2.4GHz. Either way, this is great for sharing the internet connection evenly without too much overloading. And actually, even if most (or all) of your devices use 2.4GHz (which is more common), the router still does a great job of serving each device internet connection fairly.

The disc that comes with the router includes a program that quietly runs in the background after it's installed on your main computer and generally doesn't do a lot to get in your way. Having said that, I quite like it and it's something I've always liked about buying a new router: you'll get much greater control over it than you normally would with your regular BT/Virgin/etc router. Change the security password, set up port forwarding for gaming, select filters to stop certain websites being accessed... you can do it all. I'm not saying it's easy to manage, but it's there.

So let's summarise:

- Poor build quality (on the outside)
- First setup may be clunky

+ Handles multiple computers better than the average bog-standard router
+ Has a great wireless range (covers 3 floors in our house!!)
+ Comprehensive, useful software on the disc included

"Why would I buy this?"

If you're looking for a router with great multiplexing (handling lots of different computers, especially Windows/Apple combination) and capabilities that allow you to get the most out your current broadband connection, providing every corner of your house with a decent connection, then this is the router for you- especially if you've got an average understanding of how to use computers.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Average but functional router., 29 Nov 2011
By 
S. Minchin "state_of_flux" (London UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
When I saw this on Vine, I jumped at the chance to replace my ageing Netgear DG834GT router which does not do Wireless N with one that does, and to increase the reception in my flat. For the most part I've been fairly satisfied with the N300, although I did experience a couple of problems with the setup. In addition, there are a few options here that are a bit lacking when compared to the older Netgear router, which I'll go into shortly. To be honest though, I work in IT and am a compulsive tweaker. For most people, this issues I ran into and the missing options are not things that most people would likely experience or miss.

First the good bit: this router is incredibly easy to set up. I have an 02 internet connection, and simply plugging it in, connecting to a laptop via a network cable and running the CD on the laptop had me up and running in minutes with a net connection. Virtually no configuration required. Very easy, and for novice users I suspect this will be a godsend. The problem I ran into was in connecting my Windows 7 pc in another room. As it's in a wireless dead spot and I use it to stream movies and TV to my Xbox in a different room, I have a wired connection that runs through the mains circuit via a pair of Netgear HDX101 homeplugs. With my netgear router, this always just worked flawlessly. However, with the Belkin router, I found that the PC would not pick up an IP address via DHCP on the router. I worked around this by manually assigning an IP to the PC from Windows, but try as I might I could not get DHCP to work over the homeplugs. This is not a huge issue for me as it's working now and IP addresses are assigned to every other device, but if anyone is trying to set up the router in this way, problems will occur. That said, this is a slightly unusual setup so I don't expect it to be a major problem for most people.

Once I had solved this minor gripe, everything else worked fine. Streaming works to a good level, the wireless range is slightly better than my old router (although not perfect by a long shot), and the wireless n connection is fairly speedy. The router has most of the usual options for managing your home network, although I did miss the ability to assign IP addresses based on the MAC address of the connected device. I like to use DHCP but I also like to keep certain devices on the network with the same IP, which cannot be done with this router. To make up for this, there is an option to set how long IP leases last for, so if this is set to "forever" then you are effectively locking the IP anyway, however you cannot define what this IP is from the router, so minus marks for that.

Wireless settings are quite comprehensive, although as one of the other reviewers mentioned this router does not broadcast on the 5MHz range. It will however let you tweak your security settings, and also offers protected mode and Quality of Service options for when you want to stream multimedia or use voice over IP. I didn't see an option to alter the wireless encryption type though, the only available option is AES. Again, not a massive issue but I was planning on using my old router as an access point, and that only supports the other type of encryption (TKIP), so I would have liked that option available.

Other useful options are the remote management option, the ability to block ping from the internet for extra security, and DMZ mode. The DMZ (stands for de-militarized zone) option lets you put one device on your network outside the firewall, which is useful if you have problems with certain games or consoles not connecting properly. It does constitute a security risk however, and should be used with caution and only if necessary. The firewall is also fairly good, with a security log and ability to forward ports all being quite straightforward.

Finally, there is a "self healing" app which will effectively reboot the router at a time of your choosing. Personally I turned this off because I switch all my electronics off at night to save power, but if you leave it on all the time, it could save some problems. You can also elect to dim the font LEDs and turn off wireless on schedule as well, both options my old Netgear router did not have.

Build quality is a little sketchy, the unit feels a bit plasticy and flimsy, but it looks nice enough. I do miss the indicator light on the front telling me what is connected or not, but again it's not a massive problem. Other than those minor gripes, I've not had any dropouts or problems with it since it was installed, so to sum up, this is a functional router that for the average user will perform well and has a good level of configurability. I would have said the original price of close to 80 was to high for a router like this, but as Amazon have dropped it to 50, I would say that is a fairly good price for what you get here. The gripes I've listed are things that the basic home user is not likely to miss, and if you are looking for a router that you can literally plug in and get going with, you could do far worse than this one, especially at the 50 quid mark.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars some nice features, 25 Nov 2011
By 
gerryg - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
At one level, a modem/router is a commodity product. If you know what they do you know how they work; if you don't, your friend will. They all do roughly the same thing and so does this one.

It has some nice features and some other features which while true might also be the outcome of a marketing brain storming session - "how can we differentiate this commodity product?"

The dual band wifi is useful (only) if your computer is sufficiently new to have the matching equipment (a descriptive analogy would be while BBC Radio 4 is transmitted on both MW and LW that's only of use to you if your radio is similarly equiped).

Similarly I assume the ability of the network to repair itself (a feature I was unable to test) related to its ability to switch automatically between its "MW" and "LW" on detecting high error rates (if your computer has the right features). Again a descriptive analogy would be the RDS feature of an FM car radio to retune automatically to the different frequencies as you move through the country and lose Radio 4 (again...) on one frequency.

An unequivocally nice feature is the separate guest network. A small but useful security feature that enables you to be generous with your broadband connection but without having to worry about the security of your computer or whether your guest's computer has been compromised.

While aesthetics are always a matter of personal taste, I liked the attempt to make it look less like a bit of technical kit and vaguely elegant and unobtrusive, nothing shouty (so much better than my old router, for which the first task was to find out how to turn off the completely pointless eight blue flashing LEDs).

It comes preset with name/password combos for both networks so it's ready to go. They're easily changed, too.

A final minor gripe. There are other operating systems than MS Windows or Apple, and while being a Linux desktop/laptop user makes me in a small minority, increasingly you might be using a Linux variant, e.g., Android, on your mobile/tablet. The box the router comes in, by omission, suggests they wouldn't work. What operating system is on your computer is irrelevant uses so this marketing decision seems odd.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Packed up after 15 months, 17 Oct 2011
By 
uncle barbar (Essex, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Belkin Wireless N600 Modem Router ADSL (BT Line) (Electronics)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Belkin N600 Wireless Modem Router ADSL

Firstly, the router looks classy - in its sleek polished black casing.

The router comes with very few instructions - basically link it up and put the cd into the pc! But then the instructions via the cd ensure that the set up is very straightforward - it guides you through each step. Plus - a PDF of all the router's instructions are also on the disc if you have any problems.

The usb port for "wireless printer and storage" - is great - I have my printer connected to it the whole time and therefore can print from any "networked" computer. The only gripe I'd have is - why only ONE usb port? I would have liked to have had 2 or maybe even 3 usb ports so I could have connected a spare hard drive accessible to all my pcs (ps I have just noticed that the Belkin 750 DOES have two usb ports).

I have used the "Self-healing" option - it worked fine. It had a problem, I ran this - and it sorted itself out within seconds.

The wi-fi signal appears strong all round the house - and in the garden (note - I only live in a bungalow though!)

All in all a very decent wireless router - it does exactly what it is supposed to do and looks stylish in its sleek black box. A hit with me!

Upate 10/01/2013: It appears I spoke too soon and the router, which I previously rated very highly, has packed up after just 15 months.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I would give this zero stars if possible, 7 Sep 2012
This review is from: Belkin Wireless N600 Modem Router ADSL (BT Line) (Electronics)
This piece of rubbish has finally died completely after only about 18 months. The good side is we can now buy something decent. We have to reboot it several times a day, or we can get no internet access at all - even though all lights and icons show connection is good. The range is poor - and variable. One minute you can get 4 bars, the next none at all. The little bar icon is unreliable - if it is showing 5 bars, you know you cannot connect at all. I shan't buy any more Belkin stuff, as the only other Belkin thing we had (a network card) was also flaky rubbish.
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