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4.0 out of 5 stars Worth a buy
Very helpful. Gave me the reassurance that I needed to get my baby to sleep better.
Published 2 months ago by Tina Penny

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69 of 75 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrifying
"I absolutely believe that it would do no emotional or psychological damage to a baby to protest for six or seven hours if that's what it takes" pg.200

If this direct quote does not put you off this book then I can't imagine what will.

If you view your baby as an opponent and want to 'win' (winning is mentioned many times in the book) then this is...
Published on 26 July 2012 by Kareme


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69 of 75 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrifying, 26 July 2012
"I absolutely believe that it would do no emotional or psychological damage to a baby to protest for six or seven hours if that's what it takes" pg.200

If this direct quote does not put you off this book then I can't imagine what will.

If you view your baby as an opponent and want to 'win' (winning is mentioned many times in the book) then this is the book for you. Helpful top tips such as making yourself a 'score chart' allocating a point to your baby if you can't stand the screaming and give in and one to you if you can tough it out, apparently if you do this 'after a few days you will be winning every time' seriously??

A section called 'Baby Payback' is just terrifying.... 'I often come across a baby who has learned to vomit at bedtime during failed attempts at controlled crying. If you have one of these babies you will need to teach your child that vomiting will not get your attention.'
My heart breaks for the poor little babies ignored and left to scream until they are so distressed they are sick and then do not even get held, soothed and loved after that. This goes against all of my instincts as a mother, instincts that are there for a good reason.

If I could give this book less than one star I would, if you are a sleep deprived parent frantically searching for a way to get more sleep but want to gently teach the child to feel secure and relax into sleeping, please keep searching and do not buy this book. (Different things work for different babies but mine started sleeping through with a heavily modified version of the sleeping chapters in 'Baby Secrets' + common sense)

This book is really very odd in so many ways (custard apparently causes sleep problems... who knew?!) and I cannot adequately express how much I hate it. Your baby is helpless and loves you unconditionally, please love them back and don't try to score points against them.
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48 of 55 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book teaches you how to create a robot, not nuture your baby, 7 July 2011
This woman calls herself the baby whisperer, she has no qualifications or credentials. She advocates leaving babies to cry for long periods of time which current research shows is detrimental to babies development and to their emotional well being. She encourages parents to pile on blankets that go against SIDS expert advice, she teaches that babies are manipulative little demons that will vomit and dirty their nappies purely for attention. Some of the advice is just staggeringly bad For example:

When your baby has dirtied their nappy to manipulate you into spending extra time with them. She suggests changing the baby after he/she has gone to sleep. "Don't worry if you don't get the bottom of your sleeping baby perfectly clean, says Tizzie, "a little bit of poo will not do any harm between then and the morning"

and also
"I often come across a baby who has learnt to vomit at bedtime during failed attempts at controlled crying. If you have one of these babies you will need to teach your child that vomiting will not get your attention or buy any extra time. This is hard, but it has to be done to stop the vomiting. The way you achieve this is to make the bed vomit-proof. Layer the towels in the bed and on the floor so it is easy for you to remove the vomit. When your baby vomits take the top towels away, leaving a second layer in case of a second vomit. If the vomit has gone on her clothing, undress her and put clean clothes on without taking her out of the cot by moving her to the other end. Do not make eye contact or talk to her while you do all this and be calm and confident through out, so you can fool your baby into thinking you don't care about vomit."

These babies are so distressed they are throwing up. That is abusive and neglectful.

Babies are helpless dependent little bundles that rely on their parents to comfort and care for them. Tizzie Hall is teaching parents to create little robots that will sleep at night purely because they have learned that no one will come if they cry. :(
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I wanted to rate it Zero stars, 6 Aug 2011
First, I looked for sources, footnotes, author credentials. There weren't any.

Each page boasts another unproven claim, or inaccurate, outdated and thoroughly debunked theories posed as "fact". I oscillated between shock that such collywobble would go to print, and sadness that people read this and use it as a guide for their own parenting.

The breastfeeding advice was especially terrible. I would honestly worry that if I were to follow this advice, that I would experience severe problems (low supply, engorgement, mastitis) and probably stop breastfeeding prematurely.

The low points of the book for me: her misleading statements about jaundice and her laughable ideas about milk production. We know A LOT about how milk production in humans works - there has been a lot of research on it and there is a lot of info available. Tizzie does not turn to this information, she asks a dairy farmer about how he milks his COWS! Cows are built very differently to human beings and our young grow at extremely different rates. But according to Tizzie, "cow's milk is similar to human milk, that is why we drink it and feed it to our children". I was honestly shocked that this tripe had gone to print.

I couldn't actually finish the book. It was too dreadful. I spent half my time laughing at her ideas, and the other half picking my jaw up off the floor at her outrageous claims (I mean, SIXTEEN blankets?) none of which are substantiated. Don't waste your money.
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24 of 29 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Rather confused, 7 Mar 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I do not agree with controlled crying as I think it creates negative associations with sleep and bedtime and possibly a sense of rejection for the baby/toddler who may just need a cuddle - so I looked forward to reading about a technique which apparently does not involve controlled crying.

But it does! Tizzie calls it shouting or yelling, but essentially you leave them in the cot until they are asleep regardless of how much they complain. And for toddlers you walk out of the room and leave them to it for up to 2.5 hours. Sounds like crying it out to me! The No Cry Sleep Solution (version for toddlers and babies) is much more sensitive and helpful.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cry It Out by any other name - no thank you. Horrific!, 7 Nov 2011
By 
E Goodden (Cardiff UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have read about seven baby sleep books and this stands out as the least helpful and possibly most detrimental to the parent-child relationship of any of them.

I knew that Crying It Out was not for me so I haven't read Ferber or Gina Ford or anyone who advocates that sort of approach. Hilariously this book claims that it does not recommend CIO, but IT DOES!

Hall recomends leaving the baby to "shout" rather than cry - and, in fairness to her, gives examples of different types of noises babies apparently make so you can start to distinguish between them. I find this ridiculous! There is no evidence base that suggests there is a reliable way of differentiating between baby's cries, although there are lots of quacks out there who would tell you otherwise. Tizzie Hall seems to be one of them.

Hall characterises sleep as a battle between parent and child that the parent must "win". I view this as spectacularly unhelpful way of thinking.

Hall gives the following example of an 11-month old baby who apparently has achieved bowel control and is manipulting his mother...
"James was 11 months old. His parents had tried controlled crying but it had got to the stage where each time James was put in his cot he would vomit.

We put him in his cot where we laid out lots of towels to collect the vomit. When his mother went in and cleaned his face, picked up the soiled towels and walked out. All of this was done in complete silence with no eye contact.

We sat outside the door and listened in case there was a second vomit but soon realized Janes had done a poo instead. After getting him up, changing him and putting him back to bed, James did another poo. At this point we realized it was a game to James. So we waited until he was asleep then went in to change his nappy. This put an end to the game and when he realized we were not coming back he was able to settle himself to sleep."

Horrific eh? I feel the way she characterises James here is almost abusive. He is 11 months old for goodness sake! The way she describes them "winning" when they go and wake James up to change his nappy is almost gleeful. YUCK!

If you are a thoughtful, responsive and loving parent then this is NOT the book to help you establish good sleep routine and relationship with your delightful baby. Instead, have a look at Andrea Grace or the Millpond books on baby and children's sleep. Much more helpful and thoughtful and, importantly, evidence based!
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Should come with a health warning...., 14 Aug 2011
This is quite honestly one of the worse baby sleep books I have ever read.

Hall has not researched properly before writing this book, in fact, she admits that all the content of her book is based on her own experience.

The advice in the book conflicts with WHO (World Health Organisation) Guidlines on Breastfeeding and introducing solids, FSIDS (Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths) Guidlines on preventing cot death and NHS (National Health Service) Guidlines on Breastfeeding, introducing solids and Cot Death (to mention a few!)

Hall's dodgy advice regarding breastfeeding conflicts with nearly all research that has been carried out in the past 20 years and scheduled feeding has been proven to be detrimental to supply, puts the mother at risk of engorgement (and thus mastitus) and will often end in early cessation of breastfeeding. Hall's basic knowledge of the anatomy of the breast and how breast milk production works is poor, she seems to believe that less frequent feeding produces better quality milk when in fact there is much research to disprove that theory.

Throughout the book there is references to items you can buy on her website to compliment her advice but to be honest, it's obvious that this is just a con, some items are more than 300% of the manufacturers RRP - I feel this is taking advantage of parents who really need help with sleep and may be vunerable. To buy all you would 'need' (according to Hall) you could easily spend 1000 on bedding, clothes, comforters, sippy cups, feeding spoons and the 'right' travel cot - this makes sure you have enough spares etc - in comparison you could buy similar products elsewhere for around 250-300. I did feel the book was written to compliment her website sales, there was an awful lot of references to the products she sells, including the 'Safe Bedding Guide' which is not detailed in her book.

I am curious to know whether Hall is linked to Dairy Farming and/or the Infant Feeding Industry as she mentions dairy farming, recommends early introduction of solids and even denies that Formula Feeding increases the risk of Cot Death.

The routines are complex, hard to follow and could have a new mother very confused.

Hall talks about babies as if they are manipulative beings able to vomit and poo on demand just to try and 'win' the bedtime battle over their parents. She also recommends at one point having a score chart against your baby, I found this distrurbing, babies rarely have the cognitive ability to manipulate their parents. At one point she recommends leaving a newborn baby to cry and to go and make a cup of tea, wait for it to cool and then drink it before going back to baby. This is just awful advice and could even be detrimental to babies brain development.

Reading this book made me feel physically sick in places, I am sure Hall did not mean for the book to be so full of misinformation, I would think when writing the book she really did think her advice was correct, however, I do think her publishers (Vermillion) should not have let this book be published before certain elements were at least re-written and at best removed altogether.

I would seriously recommend not buying this book for the sake of your baby's safety.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars No, No, No, 27 Mar 2011
This author advocates "Cry it Out" without actually calling it by this name.
Leaving babies and children to cry is quite simpy cruel, so no, no, no - this is not the book for me.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Unrealistic advice to parents, don't buy the book., 15 April 2011
About 90% of the book details different "routines" to follow according to your child's age and whether he is breastfed or formula-fed. I found the routines to be completely unnecessary and unhelpful, not to expect unrealistic to implement. During the first few months of my son's life his eating patterns were unpredictable and enforcing a rigid feeding routine would only make him upset and drive us insane with his hysterical crying. Tizzie Hall recommends every parent starts the routine with a 7am feed. Well, often my son would wake up at 5am or 6am for a feed (good luck trying to tell a 2 month old he just has to wait 2 hours for the bottle). Once he was full and asleep, there was absolutely no point waking him up again for another feed - I need that time to sleep!

Eventually all babies settle into some sort of a routine but it's unrealistic to set up such a rigid structure of feeding and napping. Even though I am a structured person myself I believe following Hall's routine would make me go nuts. Every baby is different and they have different feeding patterns and vary in how much and how often they sleep. There is not a single routine that will benefit all babies across the world, which is effectively what Hall is saying.

The one thing I did find helpful out of the book is to dreamfeed babies around 10pm. That is the single good advice I got from the entire book. I found Hall's constant overselling of herself to be rather annoying (who refers to themselves as a "baby whisperer"?) Waste of money, don't buy the book.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars hmm..., 10 Nov 2010
I was a bit dissapointed as couldn`t agree with the solutions given. It`s a really good idea to put babies on routines but I can not be happy to see my baby crying while he is getting used to the routine. Unfortunately I am not taking any advice from the book. I will search for more respectfull approach to my baby.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some usefull tips but didnt like all the suggestions, 4 July 2010
I bought this book after trying various other books on baby sleep and having difficulty sticking to the routines and suggestions due to haveing a toddler as well as a baby and trying to help a baby to fall asleep by herself with a toddler in the room is difficult.

Tizzie has some usefull tips that I have put into practice like not putting baby into cot unless the end result is going to be sleep so that baby learns that cot is for sleeping. Also her routines are very detailed and she has different routines for different ages and routines for weaning babies, multiples and one for baby and toddler together. However, I use the routines as a guide for what to expect but I prefer to read my baby to know when she is sleepy and her routines are very much by the clock.

The main thing that most mothers want to know about sleep is how to teach their baby to settle themselves and although I found some of her tips usefull, her main suggestion is Cry it out which I was dissapointed with, it isnt for me.
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