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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Long Live Romance
When I was sixteen (in 1962) I spent my hard-earned pocket money taking an attractive girl of similar age to see the then newly-released Dr. No, the first James Bond movie starring Sean Connery. With the benefit of hindsight that was a mistake. Being an immature, ignorant and testosterone - driven youth at the time I wrongly assumed that the James Bond method of...
Published on 10 Feb 2009 by Tailspinner

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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous Blu Ray Picture Quality - But A Dreadfully Dated Film - Even With The Ethereally Beautiful Audrey Hepburn...
If you're a fan of "Breakfast At Tiffany's" then this 2011 BLU RAY reissue will knock your socks off. For the most part, the fully restored print is glorious to look at - even in the scenes where too much sepia shading is placed on the leads for effect. The outdoor sequences with Peppard and Buddy Epstein are faultless, full of colour and incredible detail (clothing,...
Published on 19 Dec 2011 by Mark Barry


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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Long Live Romance, 10 Feb 2009
When I was sixteen (in 1962) I spent my hard-earned pocket money taking an attractive girl of similar age to see the then newly-released Dr. No, the first James Bond movie starring Sean Connery. With the benefit of hindsight that was a mistake. Being an immature, ignorant and testosterone - driven youth at the time I wrongly assumed that the James Bond method of seduction was the way forward, with the result that what promised to be a meaningful and potentially long relationship ended quite abruptly when the girl decided I really was the sort of boy all good mothers warn their daughters against. I should have taken the girl to see Breakfast at Tiffany's instead and learned from the example of Paul (played by George Peppard) how really to woo the object of one's affection. One of the most endearing scenes in Breakfast at Tiffany's is where Holly asks Paul if she can join him in his bed because she regards him as her friend. She quickly falls asleep in his arms and unlike James Bond and his ilk Paul demonstrates he is a man to be trusted with the honour of the opposite sex.

It took many years before I came to appreciate what a great film Breakfast at Tiffany's is. The film, of course, is nearly 50 years old and a modern audience must judge the film's weaknesses - and there are a few - within the context of its time. Nowadays mothers would be warning their sons, rather than their daughters, about the dangers of falling for a seemingly hopeless and self-seeking girl like Ms Golightly. Psychologists no doubt will say that Paul was suffering from a rescuer complex and was on a hiding to nothing. Well, in the real world, perhaps. But Breakfast at Tiffany's is about love conquering all, which it does in the end, and in my view the film is an admirable antidote to the harsh realities of the present with its cynical values. Every modern young man or aspiring lothario should be made to watch Breakfast at Tiffany's before being allowed anywhere near the opposite sex. Audrey Hepburn gives a great and convincing performance and George Peppard is the quintessential Mr nice guy. But for a real tearjerker, the cat steals the show. In my opinion it's among the best romantic films of all time.

JC
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Such a lot of world to see, 16 Jan 2009
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Audrey Hepburn had a lot of memorable, glamorous roles as highly individual, sensitive young women.

But her most iconic turn was as Holly Golightly, a frivolous young woman with a highly sensitive core. Hepburn is a ball of shimmering charm here, whether she's setting hats on fire or chasing nameless cats through the rain, and she's able to shine brightly enough to obscure a few flaws (such as Mickey Rooney). The other actors do serviceable jobs, but she's undeniablythe star.

"Breakfast at Tiffany's" is a daily ritual for Holly Golightly (Hepburn), a social butterfly who hosts parties, entertains drunken men for their fifty-dollartips, and dreams of owning a horse farm in Mexico with her brother. When kept-man Paul Varjak (George Peppard) moves into a neighboring apartment -- courtesy of his rich patroness -- he is instantly enchanted by the ditzy, sweet-natured Holly.

But for all Holly's fun, Paul starts to realize that all is not well with her. She's desperate to marry a spectacularly wealthy man, parties with wild crowds, visits a notorious gangster in jail, and hides that she was an illiterate teen bride to a hick doctor. As Holly's life starts to deteriorate, Paul sets out to show her what her life will be like without real love.

Reportedly Truman Capote wasn't happy with the movie version of "Breakfast At Tiffany's" -- they changed the ending from his short story's, and he didn't like Hepburn as Holly Golightley. But this is one case where the movie's quality is not reflected by what the author thought of it -- taken on its own merits, it's a fine chocolate with a bittersweet center.

Much of the movie is devoted to the friendship (and unspoken attraction) between Holly and Paul, and how it disrupts their comfortable shallow lives. Paul spends the whole movie unravelling the unhappy tale of Holly's life as she starts spinning out of control. Things climax nastily with Holly's already-questionable reputation being sullied, but the finale is an exquisite mix of brutal honesty, true love and a very unglamorous rainstorm.

That said, it's a pretty hilarious movie -- witty dialogue ("... if you like dark, handsome, rich-looking men with passionate natures and too many teeth") and plenty of kooky humour ("TIMBER!" Holly yells as a drunken model keels over, followed by the crowd parting like the Red Sea). And there are plenty of charming, warm'n'fuzzy moments, like the cute day trip through New York.

One thing that will make viewers cringe: Mickey Rooney's caricatured Japanese landlord who objects to Holly's parties. Not. Funny.

Though she was no party girl, Audrey Hepburn is pitch-perfect as Holly -- she can be flaky and adorable ("I'm CRAAAZY about Tiffany's?"), chattery and glamorous, with a cat she refuses to name because they're just a pair of "poor slobs who don't belong to anybody." But she can just as easily flip the switch to show the wounded, almost childlike side.

George Peppard is just as good -- albeit less winsome -- as a writer-turned-kept-man-turned-writer-again, whose protective affection for Holly grows as the movie goes on, but who has to get through her ironclad defenses. And Patricia Neal rounds out the cast nicely as the icy, cynical woman whom Paul gives his non-literary services to.

The Centennial Edition of this movie is, like all the others, a two-disc affair. There's a boatload of extras here -- a producer commentary, the original trailer, featurettes about the "making of" and about Audrey herself, such as "Brilliance in a Blue Box" and "Audrey's Letter to Tiffany." And there's also insights into Henry Mancini's score, Asian perspectives on Mr. Yunioshi, and the "Golightly Gathering." And so on, and so forth.

Hepburn is the flawed diamond at the heart of "Breakfast at Tiffany's," and her charm and acting ability elevate this beyond just another adorable romantic comedy.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Overall a brilliant film..., 29 July 2001
By A Customer
This is one of the few films I could quite happily watch every day. It is very different to the book, but in many ways I like the film better, (I never object to a happy ending). Its both funny and sad and you envy and pity Holly in equal measure.
Overall its a brilliant film and George Peppard (Mr 'A Team' himself) is an added bonus...!
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Showing some age, but Hepburn has timeless charm, 20 Dec 2005
By 
Budge Burgess (Troon, Scotland) - See all my reviews
The iconic presence of Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly, George Peppard's finest performance, and the classic Mancini theme music make this one of the most famous films of the 1960's, if not, perhaps, one of the finest.
Based on a Truman Capote story, Hepburn plays a New York call girl consumed by her own delusions. She is a fake, but a genuine one: she has fled some mysterious past, lives from day to day, and dreams of marriage to some millionaire and the Prince Charming route to upward mobility and respectability. Until her dreams come true, she lives with her fantasies, bored, unable even to bother to name her cat.
Peppard is an unproductive writer who makes a living as the kept plaything of an older, rich, married woman. He moves in to the same apartment block as Hepburn, and quickly falls for her charms. Hepburn, of course, is irresistible. No nudity, no sex scenes, everything coy and 'decent', but Hepburn simply sizzles. 'Irresistible' hardly does her justice.
The film has aged somewhat - the 1961 party scenes and social mores look quaint. The sleaziness of the principals' lifestyle is barely commented upon. But "Breakfast at Tiffany's" retains a magnetism of its own. A lightweight romantic comedy, a bit sentimental and sexually sanitised, it remains a compulsive, entertaining tale. It has magical moments - Hepburn, of course, established Holly as an iconic figure of the 60's, and you wonder why George Peppard never recaptured the presence he exerts throughout this film, but watch out for a marvellous little cameo sequence in Tiffany's. Watch out, also, for an appalling comedy role by Mickey Rooney, playing a Japanese caricature which would probably be banned today.
Buying this package may appeal to those of you who are avid collectors of anything to do with the film or Hepburn, but you otherwise need to ask yourself if you need the 'extras' provided with this one, for, if you simply want to watch the film, there are cheaper options.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply devine!, 23 Sep 2003
The lovely and quirky Holly Golightly (played by Audrey Hepburn) has an oddly refreshing, and sometimes naive, outlook on life. Independent as her cat, "Cat," she lives for tomorrow, always on the prowl for her "millionaire." Befriended by her neighbor, played by George Peppard, the two share the ups and downs of what life has to offer these two ever-searching misfits. A wonderful film to be enjoyed on a cold winter's day with a warm, fuzzy blanket (or a warm, fuzzy friend!).
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A true gem..., 16 Sep 2000
By A Customer
Hepburn is at her most flirtatious in this romantic comedy. As usual, she is brimming with mesmerising beauty. That coupled with a thoroughly wonderful script make this film a true joy to watch.
This film is funny,..and makes you want more...
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "We belong to nobody, and nobody belongs to us. We don't even belong to each other"., 2 Sep 2011
By 
@GeekZilla9000 "I am completely operational a... (Doncaster, Yorkshire, UK.) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Breakfast at Tiffany's [1961] [Blu-ray] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
Few films achieve such an iconic status as this, the image of Audrey Hepburn with her famous hair-do, sunglasses, Givenchy dress and cigarette holder is so famous that even if you've never seen the film before - it still feels rather familiar. She appears to be an outspoken, confident woman aware that she dazzles those who are lucky to meet her, but as the film progresses we get to see her for the fragile girl she really is.

A New York apartment block provides a chance for Holly Golightly and washed up author Paul to meet. It's the first of several meetings and the two start to see the reality of each other's life situations. Holly is a socialite desperate to bag a rich man, she often receives payment from men in exchange for her company - make of that what you will, there's no explicit reference to soliciting sex but she makes it clear that she is willing to "do anything" for the money. Breakfast At Tiffany's starts as a patchy comedy which peaks during a cocktail party scene where drunken antics turn into comedy farce, it depicts the desperation of a group of women who tread the fine balance of wooing wealthy men while also trying to keep them at a distance, it's as tragic as it is funny and still relevant today with the small groups of girls whose lowly ambitions end at marrying a rich footballer, a desire for shallow lifestyle rather than genuine fulfilment. A more unwelcome source of comedy comes from Mickey Rooney's "Mr. Yunioshi" - the Japanese landlord uses all the racial stereotypes to create a slapstick character which doesn't quite fit in with the rest of the film and looks even more out of place several decades later.

George Peppard is well cast as the down-to-earth author who tells it how it is, there's a chemistry between his character and Hepburn's Holly which really drives the film. Although the ending can be predicted from the beginning, it isn't a formulaic romance and Paul's interest in Holly seems reluctant at times and she frustrates him as much as she attracts him, there's no phoniness with him and he isn't interested in the glamorous façade, he doesn't necessarily 'want to get the girl' either - he just wants to see her make better decisions. Holly seems to be the product of a series of the relationships she's had with men, she's a psychologists dream and her fragility simmers under the surface of a confident looking woman. She's scared to invest emotionally in a relationship and Paul seems wary of the baggage, but their relationship is forged on stolen moments where their guard is dropped and they are able laugh together.

Peppard is good, but there's no doubting who the star is here. Hepburn is almost unbelievably beautiful and though sassy she comes across as gently unhinged and vulnerable, she is stunning but instead of being overly sexy you simply you want to scoop her up and sort her life out. Never before has a neurotic shoplifter been so utterly charming, her role here is one of the most stylish ever in cinematic history and yet her most moving moments are when she is not quite at her best due to tears, tantrums, or dressed in her casual scruffs giving a beautiful rendition of Moon River. Hepburn is someone I've always recognised but never paid much attention to, but it's impossible not to be captivated by her in this, her most famous role.

The cover for this special anniversary edition Blu-Ray release is pretty drab with a beige/brown cover - thankfully Hepburn livens it up with her trademark image from the film. The actual picture quality is excellent though, the soft focus scenes which Hollywood seemed to love at the time stand out more as they obviously lack any detail, but the colours and textures look excellent. To be honest though, even if this were an overplayed VHS edition - Audrey Hepburn would still look gorgeous. The Audio suits the film well and sounds clear, the film has quite a few post-dubbed scenes which stand out as the voices are almost too perfectly recorded (particularly for outdoor scenes) but this is nothing to do with the Blu-Ray transfer, it's a throwback to how films were recorded at the time. There are plenty of bonuses on this release too which cover most aspects of the classic; from Mancini's music, the iconography of Hepburn, and even a discussion about the dubious casting of Mickey Rooney as a comedy Japanese man.

In a nutshell: Breakfast At Tiffany's has its flaws but it's rightfully considered a classic. This is all-too-often dismissed as a simple old fashioned romance but the exploration of a girl who realises the value of her own worth develops into a film which is much more than the comedy it initially looked to be.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Captivating, 16 Nov 2012
By 
Lendrick (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Breakfast at Tiffany's [1961] [Blu-ray] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
Quite how I got to my 50s without seeing this I don't know. But better late than never.

It's a captivating witty tale - pretty daring and adult for it's time. Hepburn is of course stunning and enchanting, Peppard a revelation for this like me who know him for his later action roles.

Yes it's dated badly in places, particularly the `comedy' Japanese neighbour.

But don't let that spoil your enjoyment, there are too many good things here.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless classic, 21 Jun 2012
By 
Mr. G. W. Purnell "gwpurnell" (Edinburgh, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This was bought for my daughter, who loved it.

There are obvious flaws with the film, the main one being that Audrey Hepburn is just too prim and proper to be believable as an escort/call girl (only subtly hinted at but obvious to an adult audience). Truman Capote purportedly wanted Marilyn Monroe in the Holly Golightly role and she would have been a better fit (think "The Seven Year Itch") but the utter charm and visual style of the movie makes you forget the shortcomings and just enjoy.

How sad that George Peppard is now most famous as Hannibal Smith in the A-Team. He is a handsome leading man in this with a real movie star charisma - and he can act better than I remembered.

They truly don't (because they can't) make them like this anymore.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A-M-A-Z-I-N-G!!!, 12 Sep 2011
By 
Tinksjane "tink" (Cambridgeshire, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
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This review is from: Breakfast at Tiffany's [1961] [Blu-ray] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
When I saw that one of my most favourite movies of all time was going to get the Blu Ray treatment I was very excited and immediately pre-ordered it. There is always a wonder though with an old movie if the upgrade will be good or not.......so anyway, the Blu Ray arrived today and I am so pleased to say that this is the best I have ever seen this movie look....its fresh and amazing like its brand new!! You will be bowled over with the clear pristine clarity of this freshly restored movie. I cannot recommend the upgrade enough and the extras a good too. Obviously there is no need to tell you how wonderful the movie itself is and Audrey Hepburn is just darling as Holly Golightly!
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