Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars New soundscapes for old melodies
If you didn't know it already, this is NOT the new My Dying Bride Album!

This is an experiment with an almost completely new sound and feel. There are recognisable elements of the band's sound, and certainly some old melodies that are the basis for these new songs. The result is completely different, though, and you won't feel cheated that they re-used old...
Published on 4 Jun 2011 by Johan Klovsjö

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I've tried, I just don't get it
First off, I am a very long-standing and dedicated MDB fan, and I love most things they've ever written, I just can't quite get my head around Evinta. I actually had pretty high hopes for the concept: classic MDB songs reworked into a classical format - an idea that worked fairly nicely for their cousins Anathema with their similar album Falling Deeper. Unfortunately,...
Published on 18 Feb 2012 by senbonzakura


Most Helpful First | Newest First

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars New soundscapes for old melodies, 4 Jun 2011
By 
Johan Klovsjö (Göteborg, Sweden) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you didn't know it already, this is NOT the new My Dying Bride Album!

This is an experiment with an almost completely new sound and feel. There are recognisable elements of the band's sound, and certainly some old melodies that are the basis for these new songs. The result is completely different, though, and you won't feel cheated that they re-used old stuff.

Think of bands like "Autumn Tears" or "Elend" and you are on the right track to figuring out what kind of music this is, or certain instrumentals from Cradle of Filth (Humana Inspired to Nightmare, The Graveyard by Moonlight) though My Dying Bride takes it one step further in removing the music from Metal. This is slower and more peaceful music than any of that. The operatic sound is more prevalent, especially in the arias by the female singer. Aaron Stainthorpe's vocals are familiar in his spoken lines from earlier songs. Long instrumental passages with cello, viola, and an ethereal synth create atmosphere, deep soundspaces, and melancholia, though sometimes the theme is more hopeful.

The result is definitely interesting, and beautiful I think. Doomy and gloomy in a softer version, more pensive, far away from metal.

I think it's great, but you have to be open to new ideas, and I doubt everyone will like it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Something old, Something new!, 2 Jun 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Evinta (Audio CD)
Well, to begin, this is not, perhaps, what you would expect an entire MDB album to be like, however... Essentially the album consists of various melodies from past MDB albums, but reworked into something positively beautiful, and only subtley recognisable. There are no guitars, no drums, just melody, and some vocals (Aaron Stainthorpe & some opera wifey). If you think back (skipping the last two albums) and remember MDB's more melodic, soulful passages, this is pretty much an album consisting of only that. However, it has a somewhat hopeful feel to it. It is as if they are purifying the heartache and darkness from their songs. The effect, though hard to describe, is genuinely amazing. Powerful. If you are a long time MDB fan, you will almost certainly appreciate this as much as I do. If, though, you are very new to MDB, and only know their newest couple of albums, then I cannot guarantee that you will enjoy this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Collector's Item, 17 Jun 2011
By 
Johan Klovsjö (Göteborg, Sweden) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Evinta -Deluxe- (Audio CD)
This review pertains to the Deluxe version of the product. As for the music on these discs, see my review on the regular edition. I will just add that the music on the extra disc follows suit. But the total runtime is less than 130 minutes and could have fitted on two discs as well, which is why some buyers of the regular edition may feel cheated.

This version comes with a fine quality 64-page hardback booklet, in which the discs lie. These 64 pages contain the same information and images as the 16 page booklet for the standard edition, but in larger format (almost the size of a vinyl sleeve). The rest of the pages contain more images in the same style, but no more text except the lyrics to the new songs.

So this is purely a collector's item, though if you really liked the music on the standard edition you will also enjoy the extra 40 minutes on the third disc here, which is of equal quality to the first two.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most emotive album yet, 27 Jun 2011
By 
A. Thomson (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
My Dying Bride are famous for their own unique brand of doom laden, soul destroying bleak sounscapes, laced with a healthy dose of virtuoso playing. This album, Evinta is, in my view, the most emotive piece of work they have ever released. Stylewise, there's a distinct nod to the ethereal tones of Dargaard, and underneath there are some familiar melodies.
There's nothing catchy about the music, I've listened to it twice through so far, and I still couldn't repeat a single riff or harmony. It is though, very bleak, very sad and very, very good.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I've tried, I just don't get it, 18 Feb 2012
First off, I am a very long-standing and dedicated MDB fan, and I love most things they've ever written, I just can't quite get my head around Evinta. I actually had pretty high hopes for the concept: classic MDB songs reworked into a classical format - an idea that worked fairly nicely for their cousins Anathema with their similar album Falling Deeper. Unfortunately, at least in my opinion, MDB didn't quite make it all the way there.

Evinta is, as it says, a reworking of old material into a more melodic format, away from their metal roots. Perhaps I had the wrong expectations, but I was hoping for something a little more. Real classical instrumentation, more use of operatic vocals, maybe juxtaposing a bit of guitar or death vocals against sweeping classical melodies? Instead, it's a very thin, tinny reproduction of little snatches of old songs hidden amongst a wide soundscape of rather generic keyboards. It all reminds me a lot of the dull early Cradle of Filth instrumentals, with loads of cheap-sounding synths and little else to recommend it.

I really wish I could have something a bit more positive to say about this album and I really wish that they had produced something I enjoyed a bit more, however I am sad to say that I agree with another reviewer who said there was something a little pretentious about this release and in my opinion there is just not enough actually here. There are no layers at all to the music, no impact and no real instrumentation either. At best, it is mildly atmospheric background music. In fact, I can see it working beautifully as the soundtrack to a dark-themed game or film, but as a stand-alone album I do not find it worth a listen.

Perhaps I have just lost my ability to understand this genre, but all this album makes me want to do is go and get out Turn Loose the Swans to listen to these melodies as they are supposed to sound.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beyond music... into pure art, 2 Nov 2011
It is difficult to really explain where this piece sits in the MDB pantheon.

I enjoyed MDB during the era of The Angel and the Dark River and Like Gods of the Sun [Digipak]. However 34.788%...Complete really turned me off and I have not returned to MDB since.

I picked this up on a recommendation, and it maybe to my benefit that I have not listened to MDB for so long. I understand that much of the material on this 3 CD, 2hr+ marathon is reimagined/expanded works of previous releases.

Personally, I don't recognise any of them so am not swayed by their previous incarnations.

The dramatic persona of MDB is ever present, but the delivery is incredibly evolved. The lyrics are sparse, but when iterated do give pause for thought, and often more poetic than sung.

The music itself is well layered and textured, serving a multitude of purposes - sometimes augementing the vocals, and on other occasions taking the lister on their own journey.

Yes it is dark and brooding, but it is also given to shades of warmth; real contrast. It is not easy to describe, but imagine if Vangelis realised that he was the simultaneous reincarnation of Shakespeare and Byron, and remade Blade Runner afresh, substituting synths and electronics for classical instruments.

And that really is the crux of this offering. This is more than an album. It is almost an audio book, but supplemented with music. This could easily be played in the background, or equally you could sit intently listening to it, digesting every delicious layer.

That said, it is a cereberal event. There are no radio friendly three minute tracks here; quite the contrary - no track is under five minutes, and at least half are over ten.

Equally, you would struggle to describe the style; there are no double snares or thumping goth rock tracks. There are shades of neo classical, some movie score-esque pieces, and some world music in there - it can only really be described as MDB.

I can understand how this would not appeal to everyone, but personally it is one of those albums that has so much going on, albeit delivered at a nice gentle pace, that I am sure that I will be coming back to it over and over again.

In summary, a brave, non-commercial offering, that if you have the patience and openess of mind to give it a fair airing, you will be more than pleasantly surprised.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sparse and doomy. Lovely., 19 Jun 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Not much more I can say that other reviewers haven't, except to say they're absolutely right. If you're not familiar with MDB, I can't even imagine what your opinion of this album will be. But for longtime and/or dedicated fans, especially those who appreciate the more "chamber doom" tracks like SEAR ME MCMXCIII or FOR MY FALLEN ANGEL, this is a real treat.

(Also, speaking as someone who liked 34.788%..., it's nice to see MDB haven't completely buried their experimental tendencies. After all, isn't their dedication to making difficult, non-commercial records one of the things we love about them?)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Prenetious, Moi?, 13 July 2011
By 
Klausk (Perth, Scotland) - See all my reviews
A terriblly pretentious and portentious slab of nonsense. Awful lyrics, attempted by someone who should be dissuaded, at all costs [ or on the cheap at the very least ] from pursuing a career as a lyricist. He, Mr Stainhope, is very fortunate that in MDB's usual doomy rubbish, that he is partly obscured by the doom laden chords, as mass laughter would undoubtedly ensue from anyone who possessed even a fleeting appreciation of the written word. Still Stainhope escapes as his audience is probably more dull than he is. Laughable - a worthless venture.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Evinta -Deluxe-
Evinta -Deluxe- by My Dying Bride (Audio CD - 2011)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews