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3.8 out of 5 stars17
3.8 out of 5 stars
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on 30 May 2011
As a Local Government worker, I am neither a teacher nor a police officer, but I work with and have relatives in both professions. I read Frank Chalk's first book at the same time as I read "Inspector Gadget's" Perverting the course of Justice, and I would highly recommend reading both together as they give an excellent all round picture of why this country is in absolute mess, as everyone excluding the violent, criminal and feral are completely let down - our young children, the hard-working 'moral majority' and our vulnerable elderly. If Frank Chalk & Inspector Gadget compared notes, I have no doubt the inestimable teacher would be accurately pointing out Inspector Gadget's future collars, those merciless criminals who are serial rapists at 10 and serial killers at 13. From a different perspective, education and social order, each book accuses and then proves the guilt of the same attitudes, world-views and liberal fanaticism that tries to claim, "bad is good and good is bad."
This book is a worthy sequel, and I hope to be able to read a new Inspector Gadget to go with it soon. The regrettable thing is that so many reviews say this should be required reading by Theresa May, etc, etc (I'd be interested in Gadget's opinion on the new administration); the thing is that I have no doubt it is - all the Cameroon and Government policy advisers no doubt do read these books, but half of them are the foxes slaughtering the chickens in the first place and to misquote Albus Dumbledore, the rest will always do what's easy instead of what's right, because they're only interested in keeping their cushy jobs and lavish expenses.
As another reviewer mentions, the reason I give four stars is that the editing needs to be sharpened up, and also, I was baffled by Frank Chalk's anti-religious rant in that particular chapter that referenced faith schools. I presume his rant was directed mainly at church (Christian) schools rather than Muslim madrasses, Jewish rabbinic schools or sikh/hindu temple schools, etc? Not only was he factually incorrect (I do wish people would do their research properly - do they think Biblical/religious archaeologists/anthropologists/scientists spend years of their lives on this stuff for fun?) but it is the church schools, with their focus on proper morals, their understanding and teaching that virtue and vice exist rather than the nonsense of 'values', their ethos of duty, integrity, self-sacrifice, hard work and putting the common good above personal self-interest as opposed to individualism, selfishness, idleness and egotism that produce the kind of children Frank Chalk would love and would be able to teach in the knowledge he would be doing something constructive.
Apart from those couple of flaws, however, this book is a great read.
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on 26 May 2011
As a huge fan of the first book, I was not disappointed by this next offering. The author has an amazing knack of getting serious (and unfortunately true!) points across while managing to make you laugh out loud throughout this book. Would highly recommend getting this and its predecessor for a hilarious insight into the great British education system!
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on 25 May 2011
I very much enjoyed the stories of classroom misbehaviour in Frank Chalk's first book, It's Your Time You're Wasting. Education: My Part in its Downfall moves the focus from the children to those who run state education - the managers, head teachers and their teams, advisors, and trainers. Frank Chalk illustrates how the crackpot theorists and weak managers engage in a dance of death with disaffected children and their ignorant parents, leading to a downward spiral in standards and performance.

The style remains amusing, in spite of the seriousness of many of the topics, and so it's a rattling good read a well as being informative and bang up to date.

I'm giving it 4 stars rather than 5 for two reasons. First, it could do with independent proofreading. The sprinkling of typos irritates, and errors such as using disinterested to mean uninterested make me wince slightly. Second, in his chapter on Faith Schools, the author allows himself a little anti-religious rant, which is off-topic, and, more importantly, lacks comedy value. A good editor would have seen to both faults, but I guess that's self-publishing for you.
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on 29 December 2012
I enjoyed this book, having read Frank's first book I bought this one, However I found this one to focus more on government policies on education and not so much the school in his first book. However I would recommend it if you enjoyed his first book or are a teacher.
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on 4 June 2011
On the strength of Frank Chalk's previous book, the excellent 'It's Your Time You're Wasting' (which I do recommend) I was expecting a funny, revelatory and interesting read.

Unlike the first book, unfortunately, this doesn't really deliver those things.bIt feels a bit thrown together, the structure is lacking, and it is seemingly unedited (or proofread!).

There are one or two amusing lines, so I give it 2/5, but it didn't really tell me anything that the better first book didn't.
Must try harder Frank!
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on 1 October 2011
I really enjoyed Frank Chalk's 1st book and this is not massively different, being more of the same, perhaps just slightly more opinionated. I guess most readers will have had their fill with the one book though, so while this is perfectly good and I'd gladly see it through, I can't rate it quite as highly as its brilliant predecessor.
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on 28 March 2012
a good read that provided an insight into a teachers life. however i feel that it constantly reflects bad young people and not the majority of fantastic teenagers in britain. he also on several occasions has made spelling mistakes , the main one being the word would being spelt wood.
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on 18 February 2013
After reading It's your time your wasting I thought that this would follow on with the funny but true antics of working in a Secondary School.
This book looked more into the policies within the school.
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on 22 April 2013
Amusing enough, but the cloak of anonymity cloaks those who don't deserve it. Could be fact or could be fiction at the end of the day [ ;) ]. Passed several tube journeys well enough.
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on 21 May 2011
A book that every parent, teacher & student should read to keep in touch with present day education. I hope to see it soon in paperback so that a copy can be left in every staffroom.
PS I think Mr Chalk needs a hair cut to prevent him tearing it all out!
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