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48 of 48 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars History is written by the winners
Inspector Grant of the Scotland Yard is stuck in a hospital bed, recovering from a broken leg. Since he's interested in faces, his friend Marta brings him a stack of pictures, to cure him from the prickles of boredom he's suffering from. Grant becomes fascinated with a portrait of Richard III, one of the most notorious villains in history, most known for killing his...
Published on 19 Mar 2007 by Aliena

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A novel polemic
Certainly a polemical novel. What a curate`s egg this is. I`d long heard of Tey`s two most famous books, this and The Franchise Affair, and have at last read one of them. I am very glad I have, chiming as it does with my burgeoning interest in all things medieval.
Detective Grant is in a hospital bed after an accident, doesn`t fancy the books at his bedside, so -...
Published 11 months ago by GlynLuke


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48 of 48 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars History is written by the winners, 19 Mar 2007
By 
This review is from: The Daughter Of Time (Paperback)
Inspector Grant of the Scotland Yard is stuck in a hospital bed, recovering from a broken leg. Since he's interested in faces, his friend Marta brings him a stack of pictures, to cure him from the prickles of boredom he's suffering from. Grant becomes fascinated with a portrait of Richard III, one of the most notorious villains in history, most known for killing his nephews, the princes in the Tower. But can this man, who mostly resembles a judge, really be a heartless murderer. Quickly frustrated with the lack of contemporary source material, Grant and a young American scholar tries to solve this historical mystery.

All I knew about Richard III and the princes in the tower I got from Shakespeare's play, which is far from flattering for the king. The portrait painted of him in this book is very different. It's incredibly fascinating, but I'm not quite sure how seriously to take it. But the mix of mystery and history is fun, and it's a joy to read. Perhaps the most interesting part is the general discussion of how history is written by the victors.
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43 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful and concise, 20 Sep 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
This remarkable book deserves credit for not only being an intriguing story, but also a novel that is able to make the intricacies of history and medieval politics accessible to the reader. Instead of focusing on long and boring lists of sources, Tey goes into the whys of the mystery as well as the whats. Tey clearly challenges the long (and unfairly) established perception of Richard the III by asking one question: Why? Why would Richard have committed the crime? Why is he painted as villainous and grasping when all the evidence shows otherwise? Why did Tudor, who villified Richard mercilessly, never actually accuse Richard of the murder? Tey argues these points and backs them up superbly with evidence rather than hearsay from Tudor historians. She fully explores the motivations of the historians as well as Richard's supposed motives. Tey asks the questions which historians always ignore, such as Why the supposedly ruthless Richard would act with such restraint against proven enemies? These questions are every bit as valid as the traditional arguments, perhaps even more so, because they go into the very heart and nature of the deeds and the people involved
Incidentally, the title comes from the saying: "Truth is the daughter of time."
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84 of 89 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You will never look at the Tudors the same way again, 24 May 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Daughter Of Time (Paperback)
Can one really judge from the face of a person whether this is a "judge" or a "criminal" - and can one really go back over well-trodden historical ground and redeem Richard III. This book can and does it so convincingly that you will never be able to look at the Tudors the same way again. The novel is perfectly structured and must rank among the top-ten detective stories - and the Shakespeare quotation of the title makes one go back to "Richard III" and, lo and behold, Shakespeare suddenly seems to be loyal lackey of a power machine based on lies. "The Daughter of Time" is one of the best reads ever.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You will never view HIstory the same way again, 17 Nov 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Daughter Of Time (Paperback)
If like me most of your knowledge of Richard III comes from Shakespeares character assasination of him then read this book. Ms Tey manages to wrap up a very convincing historical analysis in an excellent story. Read it as an A level student and Loved it. Went on a 1 woman mission to convince everyione I knew that Richard III was innocent but no one puts it quite so concisely and eloquently as Josephine Tey
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If you think Inspector Grant was on the right track..., 22 Dec 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
I stumbled upon this book right after reading Sharon Kay Penman's huge "The Sunne In Splendour," a sympathetic account of Richard III's life (I cried at the last battle scene, 'cause, well, you know he dies in the end). It was wonderful to know that I was not alone (basing my opinion solely on a work of fiction). "The Daughter of Time" itself is a great prelude or followup to Penman's book. But then, of course, you must read Shakespeare for the other side of the story....
PS: I actually enjoyed listening to audio version of this book (read by Derek Jacobi)more than reading it. Her other mysteries have a bit more action and character development.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Richard III proclaimed Innocent, 6 Feb 2000
By 
tuppence (Adelaide , Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
What can I say about this book apart from the fact that I "LOVED it" Since the age of 10 after seeing Sir Laurence Olivier in Shakespeare's "Richard III" I have been intrigued with this story. In this book Policeman Alan Grant recuperating in hospital becomes interested in the idea that Richard III was not responsible for the death of his nephews in the Tower. I read this book in my teens and reread it every now and then and still love it. Then again I was born in Yorkshire and we all know that Richard was innocent. I would like to share this book as it is so special and does put doubt into the minds of people. Read and change your outlook on history.
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90 of 97 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THERE IS MORE TO THIS THAN MEETS THE EYE.., 25 Feb 2005
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Daughter Of Time (Paperback)
This is a wonderful genre bending book...part mystery, part history. Written by Scotswoman Elizabeth MacIntosh, who wrote under the pen name Josephine Tey, it was first published in 1951. It is tragic that the author died in 1952 and was never to know the pleasure that this book would bring to generations of readers and that the Mystery Writers of America would ultimately rank it fourth among the one hundred best mysteries ever written.
The title of the book is derived from a historical source, as it is attributable to Sir Francis Bacon, "For truth is rightly named after the daughter of time, and not of authority." The book itself is not a traditional mystery but rather an application of deductive reasoning to an actual historical event. The event in question is the murder of the princes in the tower, sons of King Edward IV, allegedly by their uncle, Richard III, who eventually usurped the English throne after the death of his brother. It has been widely held that Richard III did, indeed, murder the two young princes, his nephews, in order to secure his claim to the throne.
The reader is introduced to Scotland Yard Inspector Alan Grant, who is hospitalized and recovering from injuries sustained in the line of duty. While convalescing, he becomes intrigued by a picture of a portrait of Richard III, a likeness with which he is unfamiliar. Grant is puzzled that someone with such a sensitive face could have been such a monster as to murder his two nephews in cold blood. So, our intrepid Inspector decides that he will reconsider the evidence upon which such a dastardly assumption has been based. With the help of an American researcher doing the necessary legwork, Grant compiles enough archival historical fact that incrementally helps him formulate a new theory as to who actually may have murdered the princes in the tower.
This analysis and reformulation is done as though it were being argued to a jury. Indeed, so persuasive is Inspector Grant through the application of some insightful deductive reasoning and clever dialogue that the reader comes away thinking that Grant has solved one of the most intriguing historical mysteries of all time. This is certainly an unusual book conceptually but one that succeeds brilliantly. It should appeal to those readers who enjoy having a mystery unraveled, as well as to those who harbor a love of English history. Bravo!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading on a much discussed Historical Controversy, 2 Feb 2011
By 
Mr. David M. Gostyn (Eastbourne, Sussex) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Daughter Of Time (Paperback)
A friend of mine recently mentioned in an email that she had been reading about Richard III and his murder of the princes in the tower. This reference immediately took me back to some time in the late 50s when I initiated a similar conversation with my father, and he immediately recommended that I read this book.

The question of whether Richard was indeed responsible for the death of his nephews is one that will surely never be conclusively answered, but any discussion of the case is missing a key input if it does not make reference to Josephine Tey's book.

It is pure historic polemic disguised as a crime novel. Take away the padding of the detective and his hospital bed (not that they in any way spoil the read) and you have a very well presented argument, with supporting evidence, that Richard did not murder his nephews.

Incidentally, a year or two back I bought the DVD of Olivier's superb film of Richard III. The film actually starts by telling the viewer that what would follow is a work of fiction. And, of course, Shakespeare would hardly have dared write that piece of history any differently, whatever the real truth. But the reason I mention this DVD is that, coupled with the disc of the film, was a recording of a TV 'trial of R3' with barristers and expert witnesses. Between them, these witnesses gave a really thorough covering of the arguments in both directions.

Most of the witnesses were fairly dry academics, but one was (now) TV historian David Starkey. The price of the DVD set was almost justified by his evidence alone. The barrister questioning him certainly received a mouthful. For what it is worth, Starkey believed in R3's guilt, but the jury did not.

Getting back to the Josephine Tey book. It is an excellent read for someone with no particular interest in history. For someone interested in that piece of history I would say it is almost mandatory. But unlike other 'mandatory' history books (and, with a post-graduate history degree, I speak with some experience) it is as enjoyable as it is informative.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Better than my schooldays, 31 Jan 2009
This review is from: The Daughter Of Time (Paperback)
I found more passion and connection with the past through this deceptively-billed detective story than in a whole childhood of eductaion. The book that taught me that history is about people and that kings and queens are as human as you or me. Essential.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THERE IS MORE TO THIS THAN MEETS THE EYE..., 1 Mar 2005
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
This is a wonderful genre bending book...part mystery, part history. Written by Scotswoman Elizabeth MacIntosh, who wrote under the pen name Josephine Tey, it was first published in 1951. It is tragic that the author died in 1952 and was never to know the pleasure that this book would bring to generations of readers and that the Mystery Writers of America would ultimately rank it fourth among the one hundred best mysteries ever written.
The title of the book is derived from a historical source, as it is attributable to Sir Francis Bacon, "For truth is rightly named after the daughter of time, and not of authority." The book itself is not a traditional mystery but rather an application of deductive reasoning to an actual historical event. The event in question is the murder of the princes in the tower, sons of King Edward IV, allegedly by their uncle, Richard III, who eventually usurped the English throne after the death of his brother. It has been widely held that Richard III did, indeed, murder the two young princes, his nephews, in order to secure his claim to the throne.
The reader is introduced to Scotland Yard Inspector Alan Grant, who is hospitalized and recovering from injuries sustained in the line of duty. While convalescing, he becomes intrigued by a picture of a portrait of Richard III, a likeness with which he is unfamiliar. Grant is puzzled that someone with such a sensitive face could have been such a monster as to murder his two nephews in cold blood. So, our intrepid Inspector decides that he will reconsider the evidence upon which such a dastardly assumption has been based. With the help of an American researcher doing the necessary legwork, Grant compiles enough archival historical fact that incrementally helps him formulate a new theory as to who actually may have murdered the princes in the tower.
This analysis and reformulation is done as though it were being argued to a jury. Indeed, so persuasive is Inspector Grant through the application of some insightful deductive reasoning and clever dialogue that the reader comes away thinking that Grant has solved one of the most intriguing historical mysteries of all time. This is certainly an unusual book conceptually but one that succeeds brilliantly. It should appeal to those readers who enjoy having a mystery unraveled, as well as to those who harbor a love of English history. Bravo!
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