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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly compelling.
"One of those books that you simply can't put down" - sounds like a cliche, but it sums up Matt's book fully.
It is not a long book, but is one that keeps pulling you back - Matt transports you right back to Everest in 1996 and it keeps moving until the end. This is a book that is perfect for airports etc, as it makes you oblivious to what is happening around...
Published on 10 Jun 2005 by mjohno

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Deathzone Review
An entertaining take on a topic that can often become lost in its own seriousness. I think prefessional climbers won't enjoy this book, least of because of the limited technical detail. However, armchair enthusiasts will enjoy it because of slightly alternative standpoint on what was originally perceived as an alien environment to the author.
Published on 29 April 2012 by Razor rob


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly compelling., 10 Jun 2005
"One of those books that you simply can't put down" - sounds like a cliche, but it sums up Matt's book fully.
It is not a long book, but is one that keeps pulling you back - Matt transports you right back to Everest in 1996 and it keeps moving until the end. This is a book that is perfect for airports etc, as it makes you oblivious to what is happening around you.
I am not a mountaineer, but this book makes for compelling reading with its observations. It is written in a way that makes it easy to grasp the enormity of what is happening, without the reader needing to have had similar experiences. It is every bit as graphic as if it had been a film.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book that takes you to the top and back down again, 3 Mar 1999
By A Customer
Having read "Into Thin Air" (absolutely fantastic and a must read - my No. 1 Everest book) I thought it would be impossible to read another book that I could enjoy as much about the ascents of Everest that fateful year. However, I climbed every step of the way with Matt whilst reading this book. I shared with him the highs, the lows and the complete one-mindedness that takes you beyond every human limitation. This book gives you an insight into what it is like to take on Mother Nature at her very worst - it is not a game of winning, you merely survive (and even survival can come at a cost). An excellent read, it takes you to the very top and back down again and leaves you no questions as to the level of ambition, committment, pain, despair, faith and sheer focus that is needed to take you to 29,029 feet and stand on the roof of the World. A book I will read again and again.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A story of tragedy and success - stunning, 7 Oct 2003
By A Customer
This book provides a harsh realism to the dreams of Everest. One man's story of his ascent, brings to life the harsh realities of a summit attempt on the world's highest peak. Matt Dickinson shows the conflicts between the individuals within team, and bears his inner-most thoughts in a climate where everything should be kept well wrapped up!
In fact this is the most interest part of the book - how the 'players' act and react to what is happening.
Well written, with excellent backup material - the author does not dwell on the mundane planning aspects of such an attempt - but get's right into the action.
Don't be put off - this is not a mountineers book written by a mountineer.
Very impressed.
Oh - and it's a good book for a plane trip or holiday, stimulating, interesting and not too long! You won't be disappointed.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You'll need oxygen just to read this book, 1 Feb 2000
Having read Into Thin Air and The Climb and also Addicted to Danger and A Slender Thread in quick succession, I was doubtful that The Death Zone would add anything new or keep my interest, especially with respect to the 1996 Everest disaster. But it was a totally enthralling read. For some reason, perhaps because the author isn't a climbing afficionado but instead a rather clumsy film-maker, or perhaps because the book is well written, with a fair dose of dry humour, the book is totally engaging. You really feel the climb, breath by breath, the alieness of the mountain - and the equipment - and also the strangeness of the ultimate survival instinct that comes into play at high altitude, whilst people are dying or dead in the same region. It's a good book that keeps you gripped and is a good addition to other books written about the disaster at the time.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As thrilling a read as you will ever get., 10 Feb 2007
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The context of the book is that the author is there to cover another Brian Blessed attempt on Everest. What ensues is a truly frightening account of what happens when things go wrong in extreme conditions. Other books in this genre can get a bit heavy in the philosophy of such things yet Dickinson writes with pace and with meaning. You are left in no doubt how dire things can get. I also enjoyed The Perfect Storm by Sebastian Junger for the same macabre reasons. Had a bad day at work? Grab a cuppa and read this for an hour. It'll put things back in perspective...
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worthy, 26 Oct 2001
By A Customer
This was a great read, I recommend it to anyone with an interest in adventure and the casual reader alike. With a slightly melodramatic title, at first I thought it would be an attempt to cash in on the much publicised 96 Everest disaster.
Having already read Krakauer's "Into Thin Air", it did seem that Dickinson's account of the disaster offered little that was new. In fact, at times I felt it clung a little too closely to Krakauer's excellent account of events.
Fortunately, the book is much more than just the disaster. Dickinson has his own story to tell and conveys it with his own gripping, suspenseful and sometimes amusing narrative. As you will find out, the title is NOT overly melodramatic. Definitely worth a look.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A truely amazing account of a real mountain experiance, 23 Nov 1998
By A Customer
The Death Zone is the first book I've read about Mt. Everest, and I can not imagine ever reading anything else quite like it. Reading through page after page of Matt's clearly recounted experiance, you can't but help feeling a sence of actually being there, the pain, the stuggles, the deaths,the failures and triumphs.
Having finished the book, I read the account of the deaths of Rob Hall and Reinhard to my wife, she as was I were moved to tears by the account.
The Death Zone is a gripping and thrilling read and I certainly have more respect for Mt. Everest, the climbers who attempt to summit it and for the weather which causes many to fail.
For those who love mountains, read it, it's just brilliant.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning book revealing the savagery of high altitude, 17 Aug 2001
By A Customer
Matt Dickinson reveals the highs and lows of a potentially disastrous expedition. Many accounts would tend to glorify the event by omitting the less glamorous details. The Death Zone lets the reader realise that high altitude climbing is not only harsh, but also requires a rewrite of some fundamental moral principles. Over 8,000m means that you cannot commit to rescue a fellow human from the mountain and have to walk by knowing they will die.
This book is an excellent read and is recommended to balance anyone who thinks climbing Everest is just a feat of endurance and fitness. The mental battle is the fascinating one. Matt's own 'selfish' motives are cruelly exposed by himself as he finally pits himself against the mountain.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mountain High, 20 Jun 2000
By A Customer
This is a truly great real-life adventure and must be read by any lover of mountains or adventure. Pace, excitement and compassion are all here and I promise you that you will not put the book down until finished.
If you like this one, try Dickinson's new novel High Risk which is utterly, heart-stoppingly brilliant.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars death zone, 24 Jan 2014
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i realy enjoyed this book "the death zone".it's a gripping story of free lance film maker Matt dickenson. and his trials and tribulations of climbing and making a documentry on the actor Brian blessed, and his attempt to summit everest during the storm of 1996, that cost climbers their lives.
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