Customer Reviews


101 Reviews
5 star:
 (33)
4 star:
 (31)
3 star:
 (18)
2 star:
 (13)
1 star:
 (6)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable but a bit ordinary
I enjoyed this novel, and it was better than a post Rebus Rankin that I struggled through just before it. It lacks the spark that made me want to read all the other Brookmyres though. "A snowball in hell" is my favourite of his books, whilst "a tale etched in blood and hard black pencil" got me into him.
It would be hard for him to continue along in that line without...
Published on 21 Jun. 2011 by Dunfermline woman

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Notably different
To be honest I have struggled between a 2 or a 3 star rating, I decided on a 3 for two reasons. One it is ok for a crime novel and not the worst I have read by any stretch of the imagination and secondly I have loved all his previous books so that has got to count for something, right?

The story is split really in two, with the police investigating (mainly...
Published on 18 April 2012 by Lainy


‹ Previous | 1 211 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable but a bit ordinary, 21 Jun. 2011
By 
I enjoyed this novel, and it was better than a post Rebus Rankin that I struggled through just before it. It lacks the spark that made me want to read all the other Brookmyres though. "A snowball in hell" is my favourite of his books, whilst "a tale etched in blood and hard black pencil" got me into him.
It would be hard for him to continue along in that line without becoming repetitive though, so this is a bit different for him, but does make him more like many other crime writers. It gets a bit boring reading cliched descriptions of cops with dyfunctional family lives because they work too hard, bent coppers etc.
So, a good book but unusually for him not a brilliant book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


69 of 72 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars He's deid, Jim, 31 May 2011
By 
Keris Nine - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The latest novel from Chris Brookmyre (note that - Chris, not Christopher) marks a significant change for the author, with a new set of characters that are due to appear again in subsequent books. What's most notable about Where The Bodies Are Buried however (apart from the shortening of the author's first name), is that Brookmyre's latest novel is ...well, somewhat more conventional as a crime thriller than his previous semi-comic terrorist thrillers.

That's not to say that the author's trademark Glaswegian wit, irony and deadpan sarcasm isn't still in evidence, nor that he has lost any of the keenness of his observational satire of the bampots that pass for a Glasgow crime underworld. There's a great riff early in the book on the lack of subtlety among the criminal fraternity north of the border, where a crime is not so much a "whodunit" as a "cannaemisswhodunit". Somewhat surprisingly then, Where The Bodies Are Buried is pretty much a whodunit and the new characters introduced in this novel are a police detective and a Private Investigator.

Jasmine Sharp is an out-of-work actress who is employed by her ex-police force PI uncle Jim, to help him out with the usual ham-fisted insurance claims and scams that make up the majority of his work. When Jim goes missing however, Jasmine discovers that he's been working on a couple of other long-standing missing person cases that may be linked to his own disappearance. The Glasgow police however have other matters to worry about when DI Catherine Geddis looks into the killing of a criminal that seems to have sparked off a war between the city's drug lords, but finds that her investigations appear to be hampered from agencies within the police force itself. Evidently there a connection between the two cases, and it involves the biggest organised crime group in the city.

The mordant wit and high-octane explosions of gory violence are definitely toned down in the latest novel to such an extent that fans of the author's earlier work will undoubtedly be disappointed by what is a relatively more conventional crime work. Conventional maybe, but Where The Bodies Are Buried is still a fine crime novel in its own right, with strong characterisation and a compelling whodunit with a satisfying, credible conclusion. Considering the "missing persons" nature of the crimes at the centre of the book, it shouldn't be too difficult to work out the unspoken four words at the end of the novel. Even that however is a fairly standard twist, but it should ensure that we have an interesting PI team in place for the next book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Notably different, 18 April 2012
By 
Lainy (Bonnie Scotland) - See all my reviews
To be honest I have struggled between a 2 or a 3 star rating, I decided on a 3 for two reasons. One it is ok for a crime novel and not the worst I have read by any stretch of the imagination and secondly I have loved all his previous books so that has got to count for something, right?

The story is split really in two, with the police investigating (mainly Detective Catherine McLeod and associates) and Jasmine. Jasmine is a want to be actress working for her uncle at his private detective agency since her mum died and in between her few and none call backs. When a local known criminal is found assassinated Detective Catherine is called in, meanwhile Jasmines uncle is investigating something from way back and goes missing. The story goes chapter to chapter switching from each one.

Most notably from the opening of the book it is now Chris Brookmyre not Christopher, a show of out with the old and in with the new. Gone is the hilarious, outrageous, bizarre and captivating characters and story lines. In it's place we have a crime story with very little of the signature Brookmyre we know, now I like crime stories anyway and as far as that goes it was ok. I did find myself slogging through it and bored at times although the last quarter did pick up and save it from a definite two star review. I can't say I liked any of the characters much, Jasmine was very weak and out of place - detective Catherine had a few moments of potential for liking but really none of them had a patch on Jack Parlabane who you couldn't help but love (or hate) - I didn't feel any draw towards these characters. However that said it is the first in the series and it did give a good introduction to the characters that will no doubt be in the next installment which I will be getting. I just hope we see Brookmyre in it and not this new echoing of Rankin as I always loved his unique style and not sure I would be as loyal to this new style. A respectable 3/5 for me and hopeful for the next one.

Thanks to NetGalley and Grove/Atlantic Inc for providing me with a copy of this to review.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


45 of 51 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Plotted by his agent?, 21 Jun. 2011
Like other reviewers here, a Brookmyre completist (initially ensnared by "Not the end of the world"). Totally sold on his Hiaasen like take on the political, religious, wacky -well if you weren't laughing you'ld have to cry - world of Central and West Scotland. And then Pandaemonium, and then this. A less than totally convincing swing into sci-fi fantasy, and then a serviceable but totally unremarkable whodunit.

It only gets two stars from me because it could have been a less readable pot-boiler - and I admit I read it straight through - but it lacks just about all the elements that make Brookmyre's previous books different and exceptional. I certainly will be watching the reviews, and almost certainly waiting until the paperback release of his next one.

So where's the body? It may just be that he's run out of plot lines in his politics/sectarianism/corruption box: Scotland is a lot duller under devolution, with fewer Sassenach carpet-baggers or press barons to worry about. The seams based on teenage tearaways, then and grown up a bit may be getting thin.

But I suspect that he's where many an indie singer-songwriter finds themselves after the sixth album, trying to get out of his niche, cross-over, whatever. Produce plots that will sustain a Glaswegian Wire, perhaps. At least avoiding multi-layered plots that TV commissioning editors despair of turning into a ninety minute special, and introducing characters without pre-watershed blemishes (no alcoholics or lesbians,or Ugandan Asian Special Branch female anti-terrorist amazons, for example). Little late for the two female detective slot, I fear.

That's my working hypothesis however: under pressure from agent and publisher, having failed to carry the leap to fantasy, crossing over to the mainstream, going, as another reviewer suggested for the Rankin-Rebus slot. Sorry, I don't think any of the new characters here have got what it takes to carry that sort of weight over time. But he may be able to sell the package for big TV bucks. He may prosper as an MOR whodunit writer. But he's no longer the author I couldn't wait to read. This is workmanlike, but no more.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back on form.. but different., 25 Aug. 2011
By 
AML "AML" (Bournemouth, UK) - See all my reviews
Well, there's some grumbling amongst the long-standing fans about the change of style, isn't there? Where the Bodies Are Buried is different to Brookmyre's previous work and yes, it's a bit more conventional, a bit less political and less quirky. But it's just different from what's gone before rather than being inferior: this is a solid and very readable crime yarn with interesting characters and still a nice flavour of 'Glesga' underneath the darker tones.

Much as I love most of his previous books, 'Pandaemonium' probably was a natural end to old-style Brookmyre biting satire and unconventional plots; it's good to see he's got something new to offer and I look forward to reading more from him in the vein in the future.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Losing it, 8 Jun. 2011
I've had my Brookmyres on pre-order from Amazon ever since "Ugly One Morning", even tho' my faith wavered after the dire "Pandaemonium". But no more! This latest one is sadly lacking in the old energy - in fact it's almost DULL.

I think Brookmyre's forgotten what made him so good in the first place, and he's now trying to write Grown Up. As a result, the book is clogged up by:-

* 'Proper' words like "ostensibly", "exacerbated", etc, instead of the old joyous, salty slang;
* A 'womans' point of view, god help us, man, stick to what you know. The sex scenes from the viewpoint of DI Catherine McLeod were embarrassing;
* Some of the most laborious driving you could imagine - "He drove east along the Gallowgate, past the Barrowland and round the dog-leg up to Tollcross Road. His pace was steady and careful [you're telling me].....he turned left off Tollcross Road before it became Hamilton Road, heading north past Tolllcross Park..." on and on we go. OK, you've convinced us, you know Glasgow. Every Brookmyre since "Ugly One Morning" has contained padding, but the padding has always been FUN before.

Off to re-read "Boiling A Frog"
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different direction, 29 Jun. 2011
I have read every single book by Chris Brookmyre, several times, and this latest one didn't disappoint - even though it was quite markedly different. (I don't anticipate it replacing my top 4 Brookmyre favourites but then it is up against some stiff competition there!)

Set in Glasgow, with a brief excursion to Northumberland it has all the great things I expect from a Brookmyre adventure: wonderfully observed characters, convoluted plots, witty dialogue, and a wry, sarcastic delivery. The sex and violence has been dialled down considerably, in comparison to some of his earlier books anyway & possibly to appeal to a wider audience (?)... but it's still a gripping read.

The two main protagenists offer a nice contrast to each other: Jasmine Sharp is a slightly incompetent twist on Cordelia Gray (but with a much steeper learning curve when the bullets start flying). A very young, very inexperienced trainee PI, she gets caught up in events that are way out of her league when she finds herself running the agency after her boss and uncle mysteriously disappears. In comparison, DI Catherine Geddis has had almost too much experience, after a long history of dealings with Glasgow's criminal underworld... but even she finds that there is plenty more to learn about her job.

Mix their two sub-plots in with a supporting cast of honourable bad-guys and dishonorouble good-guys, bomb scares, unsolved mysteries and shoot outs and you have all need for a stonking book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More please!, 28 Aug. 2011
By 
I'm a Brookmyre fan. I haven't loved all his books, but most of them are very good and have kept me buying whenever he has brought out something I didn't like very much (Boiling a Frog, All Fun and Games & Pandaemonium).
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Some reviewers have called it mainstream crime writing and I suppose it is, but it is good. I loved Rebus, I love Bosch and I'm beginning to love Lennox. Some Rebus stories were outstanding as were some Bosch, but not all. Even when they're not outstanding, they're still good. This is good!
I really don't want to damn this with faint praise, but I think some reviewers are just a little disappointed they didn't get the annual dose of Brookmyre they've come to expect. I wonder what the Brookmyre virgins will think of it? I'd recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good detective story. If he continues with this style, I'll keep buying. I believe 'Chris' has far better material in him - and I really enjoyed this one.
One last thing. I'm an ex-pat Weegie. Glasgow patter sometimes has me in tears and sometimes has me running for a dark corner to cringe in (Brookmyre's rant about Aberdeen in A Big Boy Did it And Ran Away made me homesick for a week). I too, missed the belly laughs he's capable of, but, for me, the maturity of this story was a fair trade off.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another great by Brookmyre, 25 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have had this book for a while and only just got round to reading it on holiday recently, having just come back onto Amazon i was suprised by the mixed reaction. I really enjoyed the book and as a Brookmyre fan fell some of the critical reviews are over the top.

His previous book, 'Pandaemonium' was a real game changer and you can see he is trying to mix things up as an author. This book is back to what we are more use to seeing and it is done well. I felt myself drawn into the characters and can really see potential with a number of them for future books (i would love to actually see Jack Parlabane, Angelique de Xavia and an individual in the current book who shall remain nameless for plot reasons, mix it up some time)

With sharp wit that kept me laughing out loud and a good pace to the story i would recommend this for current fans or people picking this up as a first Brookmyre. I can't wait for 'When the Devil Drives'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars new direction, give it a shot, 19 Jun. 2013
i liked it. i've read most of brookmyre's other books, and enjoyed them. this one was clearly a departure from them, as he's shortened his name and got a moody-looking cover. it still has plenty of gallows humour that i was hoping for, but unlike earlier books, it's not so much in the narration, more the dialogue. there is less politicking as well.
i did notice that it reminded me of Kate Atkinson's Jackson Brodie books. I don't think it's derivative, because i was able to still 'hear' Brokkmyre's voice in the dialogue and narration, but i'd be surprised if she hadn't been an influence.
it's not going to reinvent the wheel, but it is a good read.
when the mysteries are reined in and the story focusses on more emotional elements i have to admit to getting a bit wet-eyed.
sympathetic characters, intriguing mysteries, and nasty villains too. it's what you'd want from a crime thriller.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 211 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Where the Bodies are Buried
Where the Bodies are Buried by Chris Brookmyre
£4.31
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews