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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 16 December 2012
If you need bulbs of 150W brightness, they can't be obtained as low energy: the brightest available seems to be around 120W; so these are ideal. Due to enforcement of suppression of choice, filament bulbs are now only available online; long may they be available here. They are larger than normal bulbs: make sure they will fit your fitting before buying.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 1 January 2012
Couldn't purchase this produce in any of my local shops or in my City Centre. Decided to try online and found a site where I purchased the bulbs. Very pleased, as I won't need to trudge around shops to when I need to replace them.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on 27 February 2012
Actually its a bit odd to review a bulb. It shines when I turn on the light and its dark when I turn it off. Apart from the humorus review I can say that it arrived in a convenient time. A well protected packaging in the right dimensions made sure the bulbs arrived at me in perfect conditions. The one I tried is working well. I like lots of light in my room so the change from 100W to 150W was a significant change and I am happy.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 13 October 2012
First class service and postage from seller. These bulbs are good so far.

Only problem, and this is not really a problem, only a disappointment for me personally, is that i bought these for a lead lamp and they are too large. These are somewhat larger than the 150w bulb i had previously.

If you want these for a ceiling socket then they will be fine.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 6 February 2013
I purchased eight bulbs. The first one I tried blew as soon as I put it in. The second one lasted four days. The third one has now been in for 2 weeks and I'm keeping my fingers crossed. The bulbs were well packaged - perhaps I was just unfortunate.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 5 November 2012
Bought this bulb did not use until the 60 w bulb failed was very good to start with BUT only lasted for 2 weeks not 2000 hours more like 200 could work out very expensive.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 23 August 2013
Like many people with poor eyesight I find energy-saving bulbs extremely trying and cannot see what I am doing. What a relief to find a proper light bulb. I cannot give a fifth star as I don't yet know how well it will last, but it is wonderful to be able to see to read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 May 2013
does not last as stated on box and would advise other people to give it a very wide berth not worth a penny
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on 14 March 2013
In 1802, Humphry Davy invented the first electric light. He experimented with electricity and invented an electric battery. When he connected wires to his battery and a piece of carbon, the carbon glowed, producing light. His invention was known as the Electric Arc lamp. And while it produced light, it didn't produce it for long and was much too bright for practical use.

Over the next seven decades, other inventors also created "light bulbs" but no designs emerged for commerical application. More notably, in 1840, British scientist Warren de la Rue enclosed a coiled platinum filament in a vacuum tube and passed an electric current through it. The design was based on the concept that the high melting point of platinum would allow it to operate at high temperatures and that the evacuated chamber would contain fewer gas molecules to react with the platinum, improving its longevity. Although an efficient design, the cost of the platinum made it impractical for commercial production.

In 1850 an English physicist named Joseph Wilson Swan created a "light bulb" by enclosing carbonized paper filaments in an evacuated glass bulb. And by 1860 he had a working prototype, but the lack of a good vacuum and an adequate supply of electricity resulted in a bulb whose lifetime was much too short to be considered an effective prodcer of light. However, in the 1870's better vacuum pumps became available and Swan continued experiments on light bulbs. In 1878, Swan developed a longer lasting light bulb using a treated cotton thread that also removed the problem of early bulb blackening.

On July 24, 1874 a Canadian patent was filed by a Toronto medical electrician named Henry Woodward and a colleague Mathew Evans. They built their lamps with different sizes and shapes of carbon rods held between electrodes in glass cylinders filled with nitrogen. Woodward and Evans attempted to commercialize their lamp, but were unsuccessful. They eventually sold their patent to Edison in 1879.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 12 February 2012
At last, some good old incandescent bulbs with a nice big wattage. We can see to eat our dinner again. I thought I would have to have some new light fittings and cram in 3 or 4 of the new fangled, expensive, low wattage, long life (reputedly), bulbs that leave one peering across the room. Many thanks to the EU for wishing these useless things on us, and to our Government for letting them! We are so pleased we have bought some more for our daughter.
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