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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worked for me
I wanted to get this book as the overview sounded like exactly what I needed, but then I was confused by the conflicting reviews here. I decided to also have a look at the reviews on the US Amazon site and found them to be possitive so in the end I decided to go ahead and get the book, and I am glad that I did.

It has cheezy parts to it, but IMHO they don't...
Published 17 months ago by Dee_Robisi

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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Condescending, repetitious and verbose; with some inaccuracies or inadequacies and a few good bits.
Firstly, I LOVE COLOURS! I studied technical graphics and photography at school, and I'm a vision-oriented learner. So I thought this book would be perfect for me.

Problems... Where should I begin?

The book begins with the authors telling us:
* They are about to teach us with a PATENTED method! (It gradually dawns on the reader that there is...
Published 23 months ago by Matthew Slyman


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worked for me, 21 May 2013
This review is from: Accounting Comes Alive: The Color Accounting Parable (Kindle Edition)
I wanted to get this book as the overview sounded like exactly what I needed, but then I was confused by the conflicting reviews here. I decided to also have a look at the reviews on the US Amazon site and found them to be possitive so in the end I decided to go ahead and get the book, and I am glad that I did.

It has cheezy parts to it, but IMHO they don't detract from the learnings which are well laid out and easily accessible for a novice like me. I have been to accounting 101 type courses (two) and had a family friend (qualified accountant) explain it to me, and this book helped clarify things.

I liked the conversational tone of this book and found the diargrams and simple step-by-step approach helpful. Anyway, the proof is in the pudding and I have since gifted a paperback copy to the family friend bean-counter and she even passed it on to a client. I have also been able to have a more constructive discussion about my business with my tax accountant.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Accounting came alive for me, 9 May 2013
This review is from: Accounting Comes Alive: The Color Accounting Parable (Kindle Edition)
I train non-accounting people to understand financial statements for a living.
I found the book very useful in providing ideas on how better to train my clients. We put this to the test with one of my staff recently and she received 4.7 out of 5 for a finance for non-financial managers workshop - her best score ever.
She is an ex-Polytechnic lecturer and has a First Class Honours in Accounting & her view of the book was also that it is excellent and enabled her to get her thoughts across with clarity & brevity to her audience.

It is a little 'cheezy' in parts however to-date - it seems a winner with non-accounting professionals.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Accounting comes alive, 13 May 2014
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This review is from: Accounting Comes Alive: The Color Accounting Parable (Kindle Edition)
Excellent way of explaining the basics of accountancy. Will read it again because it gives you the facts! Brilliant read
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant introduction to accounting, 9 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Accounting Comes Alive: The Color Accounting Parable (Kindle Edition)
Being an accounting student, I was already familiar with most of the concepts introduced in this book before downloading to my Kindle. However, the authors presented the concepts in a simple and easy to understand way, which would be useful to new accounting students or anyone who wants to know the basics of accounting. For me, it laid things out clearer than when I initially started studying. Worth keeping.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Condescending, repetitious and verbose; with some inaccuracies or inadequacies and a few good bits., 30 Nov 2012
This review is from: Accounting Comes Alive: The Color Accounting Parable (Kindle Edition)
Firstly, I LOVE COLOURS! I studied technical graphics and photography at school, and I'm a vision-oriented learner. So I thought this book would be perfect for me.

Problems... Where should I begin?

The book begins with the authors telling us:
* They are about to teach us with a PATENTED method! (It gradually dawns on the reader that there is nothing patent-worthy in the book).
* It is vitally important to understand accounting terminology correctly, so as to avoid certain ambiguities and miscommunications.

The authors then proceed to overturn hundreds of years of accounting terminology with their own "patent-pending" colour-coding (green and yellow in every case); as a general replacement for PLUS or MINUS, CREDIT or DEBIT, BLACK or RED, etc. The authors then teach us to think about "green-green", "green-yellow", "yellow-green" and "yellow-yellow" transactions, using a pair of fictional 3D cinema glasses with coloured filters in - you guessed it - green and yellow; which only hides obvious principles like DOUBLE NEGATIVE.
It gets slightly better from 40% of the way into the book, where the authors deign to interleave their "parable" with somewhat more standard terminology; but then gets worse again about 50% of the way through, where the authors start using the same diagrams over and over again while teaching elementary accounting applications of basic arithmetic. The example given in the book is of a shop, but just don't mention "cash accounting scheme" or the entire construction will fall over like a house of cards!

The authors' goal appears to be to get their "parable" (i.e. their non-standard accounting lingo) stuck in the minds of their impressionable novice-accountant readers as the "pre-eminent way to think about accounting", so that they can more effectively market their various other "color accounting" branded merchandise. Ultimately the book will miss the mark for almost everyone, because if you are simple enough to enjoy the writing style at the start (written in a fully conversational style at approximately 10-year-old reading level), you will probably not understand the more "advanced" concepts being taught later in the book.

2/3 of the book is padded out with self-indulgent story-telling and back-slapping congratulations for the learner for having apprehended the most elementary of accounting principles. This is an AMERICAN product using the worst of colloquially AMERICAN teaching methods. The teaching doesn't fit the British market at all. Marketing this book on amazon.co.uk is a mistake. At least 25%-30% of the paragraphs start with a fictional "grandpa" (referred to as "Pops" in the book) saying:
"Spot on", "You got it", "That's it!", "Exactly", "That's right", "Perfect", "You're quite right", "Well done", "Great job", "Excellent", "[Pops approved...]", "[Pops was beaming]", "Fancy that, [Pops said with a smile]", "Good explanation", "You bet", "[I nodded]"; etc. -- these are all direct quotations from the book! Are you bored or nauseated yet? Removal of most of this padding could easily halve the size of the book without detriment to the tutorial.

This "parable" (PLEASE tell me it isn't a true story, it's just so implausible) internally retells further fictional stories from popular American media culture (The Karate Kid). Ironically, this is one of the best bits of the book, which teaches the one worthwhile principle to be found anywhere within it: YOU WILL GET A BETTER TUTORIAL IN ACCOUNTING BY TRYING YOUR HAND AT ACCOUNTING RATHER THAN BY READING THIS BOOK. As implicitly suggested by the book, you might do best with a mentor, such as a family friend who is experienced in accounting. Ask your mentor to see some example P+L (profit & loss) statements and balance sheets, or use the nice clear & simple examples 75%-76% of the way through this book (one of the book's few truly excellent and well-designed features) to create similar statements for your own business.

Avoid this book; or simply skim through the diagrams, example statements and closing remarks, concentrating on standard terminology and ignoring the irrelevant "story", reverse-engineering the book into its essential standard accounting concepts. Get yourself a copy of Beatrix Potter's "Ginger and Pickles" (a true business, economics & accounting parable) instead. Pops will NOT be pleased with my review...
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Accounting comes Alive, 12 Dec 2012
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This review is from: Accounting Comes Alive: The Color Accounting Parable (Kindle Edition)
Found this book very interesting and helpfull. easy to read and understand the logic behind it.would be useful for people studying accounts
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not for Kindle, 29 Jan 2013
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This review is from: Accounting Comes Alive: The Color Accounting Parable (Kindle Edition)
I have the normal Kindle so I must say this book was a bit of a waste of time. Yes I should have known this from the title, but a 'color' accounting parable isn't very useful on a black and white screen, and the diagrams end up to small. I've read through a lot of the book being interested in the concept anyway, and while this technique may work for some people, I don't feel it teaches how this way of doing your accounts relates to proper accounting in anyway.
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