Customer Reviews


66 Reviews
5 star:
 (24)
4 star:
 (21)
3 star:
 (14)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I'm looking forward to more books featuring Rachel Knight
First Line: He snapped his cell phone shut and slid it into the pocket of his skin-tight jeans.

Los Angeles District Attorney Rachel Knight is a member of the small, select group known as Special Trials, and as such, she's used to dealing with the most complex and high profile cases. Rachel and the rest of the group are used to spending a lot of time in each...
Published on 13 May 2011 by Cathy G. Cole

versus
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid legal thriller that will appeal to fans of Grisham
Fans of John Grisham and Lisa Scottoline will love this, the slick fiction debut of former deputy district attorney Marcia Clark. Clark, up until now most famous for being lead prosecutor in the OJ Simpson case, has crafted a taut, smart legal thriller featuring a likeable and engaging heroine, Deputy DA Rachel Knight. When Knight's colleague is found dead in a motel room...
Published on 26 Feb 2012 by Geek Goddess


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I'm looking forward to more books featuring Rachel Knight, 13 May 2011
By 
Cathy G. Cole (Phoenix, AZ USA) - See all my reviews
First Line: He snapped his cell phone shut and slid it into the pocket of his skin-tight jeans.

Los Angeles District Attorney Rachel Knight is a member of the small, select group known as Special Trials, and as such, she's used to dealing with the most complex and high profile cases. Rachel and the rest of the group are used to spending a lot of time in each other's company, but they talk shop; they don't talk about their lives outside the job.

When another member of the group, Jake Pahlmeyer, and a young boy are found dead in a rent-by-the-hour motel, Rachel is in total shock. She must also take over his toughest case: the rape of a young woman from a rich family.

But that's not all. No matter the gossip swirling around Jake's death, no matter that she didn't know what Jake did in his time away from the office, Rachel knows something's not right, and she's willing to put her job-- and her life-- on the line to uncover the truth.

Normally I would steer well clear of a book written by a celebrity author, but the synopsis sounded so good that I knew I had to give it a try. I'm glad I did. Clark shows skill in developing an engrossing plot that moves at an assured pace. Her familiarity with Los Angeles came through loud and clear, and the character of Rachel was extremely well done.

How well done? Her intelligence and skill at her job were very evident, and a few of her flaws made me shake my head (a sure sign that the character is becoming real to me as I read). If you eat out with Rachel, be warned: she's always on a diet and thinks nothing of stealing food from everyone else's plate. Keep your fork handy. Also, Rachel gave details every time she made a wardrobe change. I'm not a typical female, so the fashion updates got a bit boring. And... Rachel enjoys her alcohol a bit too much. She needs to take care.

Clark also has a good turn of phrase, as when she describes the entrance to the county jail as "the gates of Mordor", or when she talks about a faded woman looking "as though she'd been run through the wash too many times."

I thought I had the mystery solved-- several times. Each time I had the solution in the bag, Clark put a knot in the plot and made me rethink everything. I like that. Am I looking forward to more books featuring Rachel Knight? You bet I am!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another win for Marcia Clark, 8 April 2011
By 
Susan Tunis (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
After having previously written about her life and role as chief prosecutor on the O.J. Simpson trial, former Assistant District Attorney Marcia Clark has turned her hand to fiction. And multiple starred reviews in the publishing trades attest that she hasn't done a half-bad job of it.

After a brief prologue, Guilt by Association opens with colleagues toasting a legal victory at the end of the workday. The victor is ADA Rachel Knight, who was just handed a guilty verdict in record time. The wins are why she and her colleagues put in the long hours, and no one is a bigger workaholic than Rachel, except perhaps for Jake. When Jake and Toni head out for the night, Rachel promises she'll follow just as soon as she gets a little more work done... And, after all, home is only a six-block walk from the office. Once outside she hears sirens and quickly comes across an unfolding crime scene--a homicide by the looks of it. She's waiting around out of professional curiosity when a ranking cop tries to send her packing. Rachel is confounded and annoyed--until she sees the face of one of the two victims. It's Jake; hard-working, nice guy Jake.

The next morning, the news gets worse. The crime appears to be a murder-suicide. Jake was in a sleazy motel room with a 17-year-old boy, who he appears to have shot before then shooting himself. There was a naked photo of the kid in his pocket. Hung-over and still in shock, Rachel doesn't believe it. The facts are damning, and even though no one really knew about his personal life, she just knows Jake can't have done what they're saying. Unfortunately, she's warned off Jake's case in no uncertain terms. Rather, she's asked to take over one of the cases that Jake had been working on, that of the rape of affluent 15-year-old Susan Densmore. Rachel, with the help of her detective friend Bailey and a host of other allies, launches herself into both cases, constantly fearing she's about to be fired for insubordination. "I took another sip of my drink and pondered what I could do on my own. Being a prosecutor, I was not, as they say, without resources." True that.

It's a strong debut, no doubt. Right from the opening, you just can't help thinking as you read, "Wow, this woman REALLY knows what she's writing about!" So much of the novel has the ring of verisimilitude. It may be the greatest strength. Even so, this novel really wasn't what I was expecting. It's been described as a legal thriller, but truthfully, it was far more a police procedural. There wasn't a single scene in a courtroom. Rather, Rachel was frequently out in the field, partnering Bailey, gun literally in hand, as they investigated the cases. She's not a lawyer content to sit behind a desk while the cops do their job, and I have to wonder how realistic the depiction is. It's not that it was unbelievable, but it was surprising. Either way, it's fiction, and I was willing to go along for the ride.

Rachel Knight is a strong, likable protagonist. Ms. Clark has imbued her with enough idiosyncratic detail that she, too, has the ring of verisimilitude. For instance, Rachel's obsessed with every calorie she puts in her mouth, unless it's in an alcoholic beverage or eaten off someone else's plate. While this is a stand alone novel, it's easy to image that Rachel and the various supporting characters may be back in future novels. If so, Guilt by Association serves as a good introduction. The novel is not perfect. There were times when Clark told instead of showing. Another time Rachel took an unbelievably stupid risk. And the plot did suffer one big fictional cliché, but I can't mention it without spoilers. Still, those are relatively minor complaints.

Clark keeps things moving along briskly, and while the pace never lags, about midway through things really pick up and stay up straight through the novel's end. It's a nice, tight, coherent plot with plenty of surprises and a satisfying conclusion. Looks like you've racked up another win, Ms. Clark.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid legal thriller that will appeal to fans of Grisham, 26 Feb 2012
Fans of John Grisham and Lisa Scottoline will love this, the slick fiction debut of former deputy district attorney Marcia Clark. Clark, up until now most famous for being lead prosecutor in the OJ Simpson case, has crafted a taut, smart legal thriller featuring a likeable and engaging heroine, Deputy DA Rachel Knight. When Knight's colleague is found dead in a motel room in an apparent murder-suicide with an underage boy, she is driven to prove his innocence, but of course things are never that quite straightforward... While it's tough to add anything original to such a well-worn genre, Clark's inside knowledge of the system gives the book a pleasing ring of veracity, and it's good to see a strong female lead with a convincing (and functional) set of female friends, rather than the overdone trope of isolated and dysfunctional lone wolf. Feeling very much like the start of a series, this is a welcome addition to the genre.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Effective legal-style crime investigation in LA, 22 Aug 2011
By 
Maxine Clarke "Maxine of Petrona" (Kingston upon Thames, Surrey United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Rachel Knight of the DA's office in LA is a hard-working, wisecracking lawyer, who drinks far too much and whose diet consists of egg-white omelettes and steamed vegetables as she's always watching her weight. As the book opens, Rachel's close colleague Jake is found dead in an apparent murder-suicide in a seedy dive. Shocked and upset, Rachel, her friend Toni and their other colleagues are assigned Jake's caseload. One of the cases Rachel is given concerns the rape of Susan, the 16-year-old daughter of awesomely rich paediatrician and campaign contributor Frank Densmore.
The book follows Rachel's investigation into these two cases, aided by police detective Bailey. Events proceed at a blistering pace, as Rachel bonds with Susan, refuses to accept Densmore's insistence that a young man being tutored by Susan was responsible for the rape, and together with Bailey tracks down every possible lead among the nannies, house painters, security guards and gardeners of the exclusive gated community.
At the same time, Rachel refuses to keep out of the FBI investigation of her colleague Jake's death. Realising that Jake is likely to be portrayed as a criminal, she tries to find out as much as she can about his life - which proves hard. Gradually, her belief in Jake begins to waver as the evidence stacks up.
Seasoned readers of crime fiction might wonder at the get-go whether the two cases will turn out to be related. I shan't reveal the answer here, but will say that it is 300 pages in before you'll find out for sure. In the meantime, Rachel, Bailey and Toni have been to numerous name-checked restaurants and bars; Rachel has been shot at and had her car trashed; and we learn of Rachel's and Toni's various romantic ups and downs. Rachel is a pleasant protagonist in her sympathy with the witnesses and suspects she visits who live in the dregs of the city or who are in prison. She's also kind to Susan, and helps the girl to rediscover her strength after her ordeal, despite her overbearing father. The character of Rachel is not sufficiently rounded, though - there are a lot of parts but it might take another book or two for them to gel. The same goes for her friends Bailey and Toni.
Even so, I really enjoyed this novel, partly because of its apparently authentically depicted world of lawyers, gangbangers, police officers, barmen and lifestyles of the rich and poor alike; and partly because of its total absence of longueurs. The ending is somewhat hasty and slightly unsatisfying, but on the whole I can recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good investigative plot. Although Rachel is a lawyer and spends plenty of time working through her caseload, the book isn't really a legal story (as I had assumed) - there are no courtroom scenes or legal minutiae for example - but it's an energetic, realistic-seeming account of two crimes and the methods by which they are investigated and solved - as well as providing some hard-hitting depictions of the difference between the haves and have-nots (or have-negatives) in LA.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars not my cup of tea, 20 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Guilt By Association: A Rachel Knight novel (Kindle Edition)
I struggled to finish this book but forced myself to as I hate giving in on books. A bit too much of the "hood" for my age group although I enjoy american based books I did not think there was enough of story and a predictable ending.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too slow and contrived, 31 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Guilt By Association: A Rachel Knight novel (Kindle Edition)
I was looking forward to a John Grisham type story as promised lb some of the reviews,but was sadly disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reasonable debut, 17 May 2011
By 
Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Guilt by Association is a debut novel for Marcia Clarke and is set following DA Rachel Knight as she crusades through her most important cases to her, the sexual attack on a politically connected man's daughter and the murder of her friend and colleague Jake who is found dead with a teenage rent boy.

What Marcia does well in this title is bring the crimes to the reader's attention as well as maintaining the linear requirements for an investigation and whilst there are twists that throw the principle characters for a loop they all help get to the bottom of the relevant cases in order to make sure that justice is done. The prose is reasonable, the investigation plausible and when blended with an authoritative look at the law system (well she was the lead prosecutor for the OJ Simpson case) keeps the reader going with enough material to make it hard to leave for long.

However that said, in my opinion, I absolutely detested the authors overuse of romantic descriptive clichés alongside an over fondness for going into detailed descriptions of the clothing. Personally, when I read crime I don't care, I want a story that shows not tells me what happens rather than throwing me for a loop and getting off track on inane detail about the characters ensemble, just say that she got dressed and headed to the office.

All in, for a debut novel it was satisfactory and I think that Marcia clearly has a gift to bring it all to the fore, add experience into the story and it's definitely a tale written based on what the author knows. I hope that the problems that I had are fixed in subsequent titles but if you can look past the descriptive errors then it's a book that whilst perhaps not the best debut out there certainly one that deserves to be read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars love her books, 2 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Guilt By Association: A Rachel Knight novel (Kindle Edition)
this it the first book i have read from Marcia Clark and i couldn't put it down really well written. Went straight on to Amozon and brought the next one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Loved this book, 18 Jun 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Guilt By Association: A Rachel Knight novel (Kindle Edition)
Really enjoyed this book, the characters were believable and especially loved the good and bad guys where women, will read more of this author.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars good, 4 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Guilt By Association: A Rachel Knight novel (Kindle Edition)
Enjoyed the book. Some of the sub plot could be seen prior to the reveal but overall a good book
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews