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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Earthy and original
Packed with earthy, Aussie outback realism this is a fine, if bleak, crime novel on a familiar theme. Cashin is a marvellous and original creation and the book is studded with some terrific dialogue. Perhaps the ending was mildly underwhelming though.
Published on 14 Aug. 2006 by William

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow starter, but certainly worth a look
I found this to be a novel in two very distinct halves.

The first half plods along, heavy on scene-setting and characterisation, the main plot - of a rich white man battered and robbed in his own home, and the subsequent assumptions toward the Aboriginal youths accused of the crime - seemingly forgotten at times. That said, Temple does this extremely well and...
Published on 6 May 2007 by Antony


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Earthy and original, 14 Aug. 2006
By 
William (Buckinghamshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Broken Shore (Hardcover)
Packed with earthy, Aussie outback realism this is a fine, if bleak, crime novel on a familiar theme. Cashin is a marvellous and original creation and the book is studded with some terrific dialogue. Perhaps the ending was mildly underwhelming though.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mesmerizing, 11 July 2006
This review is from: The Broken Shore (Hardcover)
You know you've read a good book because it stays with you long after you've read the final page, and the hair on the back of your neck is standing on end. When I closed The Broken Shore, I felt a tingle throughout my body and I knew that I had read possibly one of the best crime books this year. This novel marks Temple out as a truly superb (crime) writer, his skilfull use of language compliments the plotting. He has the unerving ability to create vivid characters and the sense of place within a few sentences similar to Hemmingway. Temple not only explores the themes of justice but also of family. This is crime writing at its best.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chandleresque, 22 Jun. 2006
By 
Peter Jay "petjay" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I finished reading this book over a week ago but I am still thinking about it, its structure and its language. Broken Shore is not just "a crime novel"; it is a superb novel in its own right. Bit by bit, through the elliptic dialogue and descriptions of Senior Detective Joe Cashin's thought processes we learn about him, his colleagues, racism and the events that have shaped his

life and, almost incidentally (it first appears) an attack on a local,retired businessman.

It is not a long book but it is not a quick read. The dialogue is parred down to the essentials and some passages have to be read more than once to get a full understanding of them. The time spent on the book is well rewarded.

That the ending can (at least in part) be predicted some way off doe not diminish the novel; it reflects (in hindsight) the natural and logical progression of the story
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great sense of place and character, 5 Feb. 2008
By 
E. A. N. Otway "nadine" (france) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Broken Shore (Paperback)
This is a marvellous book. The main character is a bruised and battered,- both physically and mentally,- Australian detective. Like all the great fictional cops - Wallender and Bosch for example, he struggles with the demon alcohol and loneliness, but struggles to find the truth.

All the characters come brilliantly alive and the dialogue is totally realistic. I was gutted when the book ended and I realised I was in Europe, not in Australia. Such is the strong sense of place which the author evokes.

A previous reviewer has complained about the slow beginning, but why would you want to rush through such a deeply satisfying read?
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's All About Family,The One You Have And The One You Make, 14 Mar. 2011
By 
prisrob "pris," (New England USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Broken Shore (Paperback)
I read Peter Temple's latest book, 'Truth' before I found this book. I became so engaged with the author, I knew I wanted to read all of his books. What I found within 'The Broken Shore' are all the characters that are bound for their own novels.

Joe Cashin is a former homicide detective, still recovering from severe injuries suffered in a botched stake-out. The injuries so severe, he was sent home from Melbourne to Port Monro to run the small police station. Cashin's routine day in this new job was not as simple at it might seem. One of his colleagues was beaten and used as a sex doll by someone who followed her. You need smarts to run a department like this, a feel for the neighborhood. Cashin is a mixture of kindness, a man of few words and prone to outbursts of temper. He has one liners that catch his opponent off guard. He has a sense of humor and be prepared to laugh.

One of the aspects of Temple's writing is that he catches you unaware. We meet Joe Cashin as he is walking his dogs near a creek. The dogs, are two unlikely giant poodles. Poodles, yes, who chase the wildlife and in particular, rabbits. Peter Temple is an exquisite descriptive writer who makes magic with his words. The novel is in fact a blend of crime fiction and a literary wonder. Temple is well known in Australia, where he lives, "The Broken Shore" has already won the Ned Kelly Award for crime fiction.

In Port Monro a wealthy citizen is beaten to death in his home. Three teenage Aborigines, are charged with the crime. It is important to know that prejudice against Aborigines is central to the novel. Cashin is not convinced of their guilt, and he disobeys his superiors and follows leads that point to several of the region's leading citizens.

Peter Temple gives us rich portraits of his characters. There is Cashin, who comes from a troubled family. He medicates himself from his constant pain with minimal narcotics and booze. He has an ex girlfriend who won't let him see their son. Cashin meets a swaggie or hobo, and he invites him to stay on his property and help rebuild his home. I see an entire book written around this character. We meet Cashin's boss, Villani who shows up as the main character in his newest book, 'Truth'. There is a politician, another detective in a neighboring town who is so nasty that I wanted to slap his face. An old classmate of Joe's who is a newly minted lawyer and a looker. His cousin Bern, who helps him with building materials and gossip of the surrounding towns. So many wonderful layers are built within these characters, that it is difficult not to ponder what they are all about.

This is world class writing, mixed with very nasty criminals who commit outlandish crimes that make you wince and blind your eyes. The superb writing and characterization make for one of the best crime novels I have read in a long time. I look forward to reading about all of the characters I have met in this book.

Highly Recommended. prisrob 03-14-11
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow starter, but certainly worth a look, 6 May 2007
By 
This review is from: The Broken Shore (Paperback)
I found this to be a novel in two very distinct halves.

The first half plods along, heavy on scene-setting and characterisation, the main plot - of a rich white man battered and robbed in his own home, and the subsequent assumptions toward the Aboriginal youths accused of the crime - seemingly forgotten at times. That said, Temple does this extremely well and although I felt a little frustration at the lack of urgency in the investigation, I was never bored. In fact, I really liked Joe Cashin, Temple's protagonist, and found the peripheral characters (if somewhat redundant to the plot) satisfyingly engaging. Perhaps, though, this pace is intentional.

The story is also heavy on politcal wrangling. The police are keen to pin it on the Aboriginal youths when an arrest goes terribly wrong, and the left-wing politicians are adamant the police are racists who don't care about the truth. Therefore, a slow, labouring sense of non-urgency is perhaps the best device. Temple, laden with the cop-with-a-haunted-past cliche, avoids further cliche by not showing Cashin to be holier-than-thou, fighting the Aboriginal cause tooth and nail; he just wants to get on with his life.

It took me three days to read through the first half, and was tempted to give up. However, when Cashin finally gets his backside in gear and begins investigating properly, the story really captivated me. Much darker than I expected, moving at pace, I finished the second half in one sitting. I enjoyed the second half so much I'd recommend it to any fan of crime fiction. Stick it out, it's worth the wait.

Temple creates a very real character in Joe Cashin and sets the reader firmly in the Australian small town, giving even us pommies a superb sense of place. Certainly worth a read, and I'll be checking out Temple's back catalogue shortly.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very, very good, 25 Jun. 2009
This review is from: The Broken Shore (Paperback)
An excellent, well structured novel with convincingly flawed characters and sparse, pointed dialogue that is a joy to read. The language is vividly Australian and is sometimes unfamiliar but it repays the effort; the attitudes to race that dominate the first half of the book are convincingly genuine albeit unwelcome and perhaps genuinely offensive too. The police are also flawed, racist and inept; apart from Cashin himself the most sympathetic character is the swaggie he finds, and who is also quickly written off by others. I loved the moment when Cashin, fed up with the attitudes he encounters, knocks out the supermarket owner with a can of dog food. Excellent book, evocative and powerful, like most of his others. Persevere and the reward will come.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very entertaining, 19 Oct. 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Broken Shore (Paperback)
Joe Cashin, a detective still haunted by a previous case which nearly saw him killed, leads an investigation into a brutal murder. The settings are some small Victorian communities and Melbourne, to some extent. Racial issues form a backdrop to the story.

It would be an exaggeration to say Temple writes with flair, but it would be very accurate to say he comes up with some great lines and good deal of humour.

Here he has developed a good plot which unfolds very nicely and delivers a number of smaller twists. There are no flat moments in the book. Part of this is due to Cashin being a very likeable character.

Overall, this was quite an interesting novel which kept me well entertained. 9/10
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Windswept and atmospheric, 1 Jan. 2010
By 
Julia Flyte - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Broken Shore (Paperback)
Joe Cashin is a Homicide Detective who has been reassigned from Melbourne in Australia to his quiet coastal hometown after a near brush with death on the job. He is investigating the killing of a high profile local businessman. Initially clues point to local Aboriginal boys and after a shoot out with police leaves two of the three suspects dead, the case seems closed. But Cashin feels guilty about the shoot out and is unconvinced about the conclusions being drawn, so he keeps investigating.

This is an absorbing and well written book that is part mystery, part social commentary and part character study. It is not a traditional crime novel and most certainly not a fast-paced thriller. In fact at times the crime feels like it's almost a sub-plot. (I also found the eventual solution to be pretty sordid and unpleasant, as it involves pedophilia - consider yourself warned.)

So the book is richer than a simple murder mystery - its themes include racial tensions and police corruption. Peter Temple is a wonderful writer who uses words carefully and sparingly. Cashin is a complex and satisfying main character and the lesser characters are also rounded and interesting. I read this book quickly, feeling completely immersed in the remote seaside town. If you enjoy Ian Rankin and Henning Mankell, you'll almost certainly like this also.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enthralling., 12 Oct. 2009
By 
Thrutcher (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Broken Shore (Paperback)
Just finished "The Broken Shore" after leaving it unattended on a bookshelf for a couple of years. I'll be buying more Peter Temple as soon as I've finished writing this. He's managed to strike a perfect balance here between creating a wholly detailed environment and complex characters whilst maintaining a fast pace in the narrative. I couldn't put it down.

Quick précis: man with inner demons investigates crime in small town with inner demons.

Recommended for anyone looking for a page-turner set somewhere off the beaten track.
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The Broken Shore
The Broken Shore by Peter Temple
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