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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Apperances aint everything
When I bought my ticket for this film in the cinema I immediately regretted buying it and nearly turned back to get a refund based on my pre-judged assumptions that this was to be a terrible film. The misleading trailers that created this image gave way for an immensely pleasant surprise as I watched the film.
Set in Vietnam, the story follows Michael Cane as a...
Published on 1 Sep 2003 by born_raised

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Worst Bluray transfer ever?
Excellent film, I won't go on at length about that.

The Bluray transfer is truly appalling. Massive banding throughout, noticeable in dark scenes but generally present throughout. Colour timing is just staggeringly off, so that people's faces look like yellow Plasticene, let alone plastic. It's been rushed out after Disney gave up on Miramax and it hasn't been...
Published 9 months ago by Richard Coggins


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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Apperances aint everything, 1 Sep 2003
When I bought my ticket for this film in the cinema I immediately regretted buying it and nearly turned back to get a refund based on my pre-judged assumptions that this was to be a terrible film. The misleading trailers that created this image gave way for an immensely pleasant surprise as I watched the film.
Set in Vietnam, the story follows Michael Cane as a journalist, living with his Vietnamese mistress, reporting on events during the war. A friendship with Brandon Fraser, leads to an unravelling plot of conspiring events in Vietnam based around this friendship, and the test of friendship when a woman is added into the equation.
The films excellent story proves to be a film that keeps the watcher constantly thinking, suspicious of all characters and in a changing mindset of what will unravel next.
An excellent film, well worth watching!!!
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Greene, classic Caine, 15 Sep 2003
By 
Otto99 "otto717" (Warwickshire) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
I came to this film as a fan of both Graham Greene and Michael Caine. The screenplay is a very faithful adaptation of the novel, and the characterisation and settings are excellent. The Vietnamese scenery is stunning throughout, the mud-blasted hell of Phat Diem contrasting vividly with the polite finesse of French-Colonial Saigon. Caine dominates the picture with a mighty but human performance as Fowler, the journalist desperately trying to cling on to his relationship with young Vietnamese beauty Phuong (played by the lovely Do Thi Hai Yen). Into their world comes the quiet American, Aiden Pyle, played in a suitably underhand manner by a chubby Brendan Fraser.
The film is well-paced and the "action" sequences are very well done, particularly the infamous bombing in the square which is recreated with frightening realism. I found it all totally gripping, even though I knew the plot and the outcome. The scenes between Caine and Fraser show these two at their very best, Caine surely at yet another high in his career.
In terms of extras, you don't get much - just a documentary on the filming of the bomb sequence, which is interesting. But I often feel there is too much emphasis on DVD extras anyway - in this case the film itself is more than enough and one that will repay many viewings.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Worst Bluray transfer ever?, 10 Oct 2013
By 
Richard Coggins (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Excellent film, I won't go on at length about that.

The Bluray transfer is truly appalling. Massive banding throughout, noticeable in dark scenes but generally present throughout. Colour timing is just staggeringly off, so that people's faces look like yellow Plasticene, let alone plastic. It's been rushed out after Disney gave up on Miramax and it hasn't been remastered at all: it looks like it's derived from a VHS master, it's that bad.

Don't buy this: write and complain and await a proper remastered transfer which captures the lovely luxurious darks and sensuous colours. Awful.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too much grain, 7 Oct 2011
Although the movie itself is good, the bluray disc has alot of grain. This is something important to know. I can understand some grain, but in certain parts of the movie it's almost unbearable to watch, it's that bad.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Awful quality blu-ray, 2 July 2013
Good film, I thought I'd buy it on blu-ray for the ultimate viewing experience... How disappointing. The picture quality is extremely grainy, I'd expect better from a standard quality DVD.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lost Love In A Lost Time, 1 July 2004
By 
Martin A Hogan "Marty From SF" (San Francisco Bay Area) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Although Michael Caine was nominated for an Oscar for his performance, this film went largely unnoticed. That's a shame, as it presents a true love story form a period of time in a place largely ignored - 1952 Vietnam. Thomas Fowler (Michael Caine) is a married British journalist who is in love with a beautiful young Vietnamese woman and writes for the British press. He has found his true paradise. Director Philip Noyce is able to bring out the humid, romantic nuance of war-torn Vietnam. An American physician named Alden Pyle (Brendan Fraser) appears out of nowhere and confesses his love for Fowler's lover. What ensues is a seemingly gentlemanly sparring for the affections of Phuong (Do Thi Hai Yen). As the story unfolds, we find that Pyle is not all he seems, Fowler is less lazy than previously thought and Phuong is torn (with lots of help from her selfish sister). The revelations come slowly and subtly and the back-drop of the early fifties Vietnam is hypnotizing. By the end of the film, the surprises are revealed and nothing is what it had seemed, although the viewer is left with the nagging thought of what will happen after this?
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The seduction of American innocence, 3 Mar 2006
By 
Joseph Haschka (Glendale, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
Of all the films I've seen over the years concerning America's involvement in Vietnam, THE QUIET AMERICAN is perhaps the most seductive.
It's 1952, and Thomas Fowler (Michael Caine) is the aging correspondent for the London Times in Saigon. France is in the process of being tossed out of Indochina, but the former doesn't realize it yet - Dien Bien Phu is still in the future - and its military fights on ineffectually against the communists. In the meantime, Fowler submits the occasional story to the head office while finding comfort in the arms of opium and his Vietnamese mistress Phuong (Do Hai Yen), a former taxi dancer at a local club. Then, one day, THE QUIET AMERICAN Alden Pyle (Brendan Fraser) shows up. Pyle claims to be with a medical aid mission in country to combat trachoma, a bacterial disease causing blindness. But what is Pyle, really? He seems awfully chummy with the conniving powers over at the U.S. legation. In any case, Alden very soon falls in love with Phuong, attention that neither the jealous Fowler can prevent nor Phuong finds particularly unwelcome.
Not since LITTLE VOICE (1998) has Michael Caine acted so powerfully, and this is perhaps his greatest role ever. An Academy Award nomination is deservedly due. Fraser is perfect as the clean-cut, idealistic and naïve Yank who may be something other than he claims. Yen is positively exquisite as the delicate Phuong. As Fowler puts it, his death would begin if he lost her.
THE QUIET AMERICAN, based on the Graham Greene novel, can be seen as an allegorical story of America's fledgling interest in succoring Vietnam from the Red Menace. After all, the French seem unequal to the task. Pyle perhaps comes to symbolically represent the American innocence that is seduced by Vietnam in the form of Phuong, and the former wishes "to save" the latter from the escalating national chaos. Only the tired and world-weary Fowler knows that this is impossible. He would "save" Phuong himself if he could, but he can't.
THE QUIET AMERICAN is an anti-war, anti-intervention film best viewed these many years after America withdrew from its Southeast Asian debacle and passions have cooled. This is one of the best films of 2002.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Caine at his best..., 7 Mar 2007
By 
Michael Caine demonstrates the versatility that first drew him to the attention of the film making moguls. A truly powerful performance that carried along a much weaker supporting actor. The plot is based on a solid novel by Graham Greene and the underlying message becomes all too evident. Intellectually stimulating, the developing relationships between an American convinced that the ends justify the means, an Englishman rapidly being overtaken by events and a young girl, desperate for some sort of commitment are poignant parallels to the wider political situation.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At the edge of the abyss, 26 Mar 2004
By 
Stephen A. Haines (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Crackling with tension from the opening scenes, this is an outstanding film. Noyce's team responds brilliantly to his direction in this tight drama about pre-American Viet Nam. The film captures the nature of the changing struggle as the almost invisible Viet Minh probe Saigon's defenses. The French, clearly floundering, are minimally represented. The war, the politics, the corruption are merely background to this story of desperate love. Yet all those subdued elements intrude on the three protagonists who must react to them. Love and war are a common theme in many films, but are brought together in this one with uncommon sensitivity. The Viet Nam conflict nearly tore America apart in later years. The time for this film is long past, but the way Noyce has adapted Greene's novel makes it enduring and pertinent today.
Michael Caine, as the indifferent British journalist, provides his paramount performance. A superb actor in all his roles, with this one he assumes status among the very best. Given the power of his presence in this film, it might be expected that Brendan Fraser be overshadowed. Yet this rather bumbling character from The Mummy assumes a more confident stance. As the American intruder on both Caine's own love affair and the struggle to restrain the Communist forces, he fulfills the role with unexpected polish. Do Thi Hai Yen, the woman caught up in both the political and personal conflicts, applies a tender counterpoint to the many levels of strife displayed elsewhere in the film. Noyce's use of close-up in many scenes heightens feeling while keeping the characters as the film's focus.
Greene's novel demonstrated how Viet Nam might become a morass of misdirected action. It was, he predicted, not a place for the clumsy. Fraser's role illuminates how prescient Greene was in the book. The withholding of this film by the studio was an error. Noyce's direction is flawless as he portrays the languid journalist becoming alert as he senses Fraser's presence is more than circumstantial. His boldly asserted simple-minded faith in America's ability to solve geopolitical issues by brute-force presence is a message that should have been heeded when the book was published. Hopefully, this film will again confront viewers with that clear message.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as the book but a good try., 2 Jun 2007
By 
Hugh M. Dowdalls "huext" (fife,scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I do not know if Michael Caine was ideal in the role as the "burnt out" journalist in indo china.However the story is an excellent one,and one that gives an insight into the beginning of the Vietnam war ,when the Americans were replacing the French as the "Colonial Power".

The messages in this book are about missunderstanding,both on a personal and international level,and a semi-selfish idea of knowing whats best for someone else,even although perhaps you do not understand their position.

A very good film,but not one if you do not wish to follow and think about the story.
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