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206
4.3 out of 5 stars
A Matter of Honour
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Price:£3.59
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 2 January 2009
Having read the last review i have to say that i'm a girl and i really enjoyed this book! Ok so it's not Jeffery Archer's best but this was the first one of his i ever read & i was certainly encouraged ater reading this to read more of his & i'm now a big Archer fan.
This book is very easy to read, good for a summer read maybe, nothing deep or heavy. Fast-paced and entertaining. Good fun.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on 31 January 2001
this book restored my faith in reading. it has everything that you would want from a book. every page has a new thing happening. it;s mainly about a guy whose father dies and in his will leaves his son a letter that was the cause of his unrespectful death. he is not allowed to open but does anyway.the letter is written in german. in search of answers he comes across people who want what's in the letter. this book has everything. murder, adventure and most of all a thrilling chase.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 3 January 2014
Cold War adventure set in the 1960s in which the KGB and the CIA are after a religious icon, once the property of the Tsar, which contains a secret treaty concerning the Alaska Purchase which, it turns out, was actually a 99-year lease (hence the time setting) - meaning that if the Russians can get their hands on it, they get Alaska back. At the same time, a former British Army officer has been bequeathed an item that's deposited in a Swiss bank under a false name. There are no prizes for guessing what the item is, and it's not long before said officer becomes embroiled in a game of cat-and-mouse with the CIA and the KGB, both of whom are desperate to get hold of the icon for the reasons outlined above.

Personally, I think Jeffrey Archer does better at short stories, and of his various books this isn't, in my view, one of his best. It's all rather predictable (the exact nature of the officer's flatmate's job, for example, was not a great surprise when finally revealed) although it does at times it takes a turn for the macabre (if you have ever wondered how a KGB agent would go about disposing of a body in Zurich, the answer can be found here).

Archer's take on the Alaska Purchase bears a resemblance to the British 99-year lease on the New Territories, which formed the basis for the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration that guaranteed that all of Hong Kong would be handed over to China in 1997. Given that this novel was published two years later, it's hard not to think that he had this in mind while he was writing this novel.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 5 August 2013
On receiving an inheritance from his father, Adam Scott is also left a secret letter which leads him to pursue an interest in the original of a famous painting which in turn contains yet more important secrets which are of the utmost importance to the Soviet KGB.
The search leads Adam, an ex-military man, into a stark conflict with the interests of the Russian secret service who are themselves, to understate, not genteel in their approach towards Adam or his loved ones. The conflict provides the engine for the murder and mayhem and so, what might be called, the thrill.
As usual for Jeffrey Archer there is a plethora of action scenes with the unwitting being bumped off and even Adam's girlfriend meeting her maker prematurely, but what for Adam could have been a matter of honour is an end which, I thought, didn't always justify the means, bearing in mind the number of corpses, including that of his girlfriend, which ensue for the sake of the action and the 'thrill'.
Even so, again, the yarn is cunningly woven.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on 21 February 2001
A Matter of Honour is the first book I have read by Jeffrey Archer and it certainly won't be the last. Finally, I have found a type of fiction which interests me, and compels me to keep reading. At times, I could hardly bear to put the book down. It's the type of story that wouldn't look out of place in a James Bond film, it's a shame Ian Fleming hadn't written it himself. Rather than retell the whole novel, I'll just recommend it to anyone who appreciates a really good mystery/crime fiction. Absolutely brilliant, the novel centres around the activities of Adam Scott, who follows up a historical event after his father's death. His mission takes him all over Europe and he is chased by Russian spies. And all for the sake of a Tsar's icon, though there's a lot more to the novel. Trust me, just read it and you won't be disappointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 March 2014
I did my best to enjoy this book, good story, rattled along well, but goodness, who on earth cleared this for Kindle? There were some typo's which weren't even spelling mistakes, they were total rubbish, like, non- words. For example, ( this guy is drinking coffee) " he took a sip but it was too hot so he placed it oil the table in front of him" What?! Another example is the use of the number 1, instead of the word, one. And this " with Valchek ( character name) conveniendy out of the way..Finally, frequent uses of "die". Instead of "the" which at least is a word, although German, not English.
I got to the end, and although some sentences did elude me for what Jeffrey Archer originally wrote to make sense, I did enjoy the plot. Pity about the rubbish proof reader, or should I say "prof rider"
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 14 October 2004
The Soviet authorities have come to realise that a famous painting is only a copy, and that the original probably holds a document of the utmost importance to them.
At the same time, Adam Scott inherits a pitiful sum of money and a sealed letter from his father.
Soon the KGB and Adam hunt each other through Europe, wanting to possess the original painting and its contents. The KGB is ruthless from the start; Adam becomes ruthless as the KGB hurts him and those near and dear to him. Despite Adam's military background and MC, his ruthlessness is quite out of character with how he is portrayed initially and outside the action scenes.
While the general plot is intriguing (what if?) the characters are on the whole quite unbelievable, which makes the book too much of a boy's book - all action and no depth. Adam wastes little feeling on his dead girlfriend, and has no qualms about risking the lives of innocent bystanders. The Russians are quite the standard stereotype of KGB super-agents, near James Bond standard, but with no morals nor ideals.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 16 August 2003
As usual with Archer's books, I could not put this one down. His thrillers are always terrribly exciting, but I especially enjoyed this one. It is a novel about an ordinary person, who through certain circumstances, becomes drawn into international espionage through following up on a letter received as part of his father's will. I read the entire thing in one day and evening, starting in the morning, and finishing at midnight. And you won't be able to put it down either ! !
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 16 July 2003
i have read all jeffrey archers including his latest sons of fortune. basically archer writes two kinds of novels -- one the bildungsroman like kane and abel, first among equals and as the crow flies, or else he writes edge of the seat thrillers like eleventh commandment. of course, being a bestselling novelist there arent sharp demarcations. this novel is of the second kind. it is one of the best thrillers that i've ever read. the protagonist is depicted in a manner that would do a nobel winning author proud. however, the depiction of the other characters leaves something to be desired. this along with the plot being slightly confusing at times led me to take away a star. if u like thrillers or if like me u cant sleep this is a must read. u wouldnt regret, and also u wouldnt know it is, morning by the time u have completed reading it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 19 December 2012
As good as Archer gets - always worth the time to sit and enjoy - interesting but not so complicated that you loose the thread
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