Customer Reviews


 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why do so few people get it?
'Paradise Towers' has a rather poor reputation, in fact it is perceived by many to be one of the weakest Doctor Who stories ever. Is this reputation deserved? Absolutely not in my opinion.

There are some wonderful sets for the towers, in the past Doctor Who sets had been inappropriate because they were so spotlessly clean, in this story the sets look grubby...
Published 17 months ago by Benjamin Coupland

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Paradise Last
In fact, Paradise Not Quite Last, there are a few `Doctor Who' episodes often thought worse than this. But not many. 2*

`Paradise Towers' is a huge, once luxurious residential complex now fallen into squalor. It would be easy to see this as yet one more political satire on the 1980s, but tower blocks grew from the Utopian idealism of the 1950s; `the people'...
Published 13 months ago by Number13


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why do so few people get it?, 21 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
'Paradise Towers' has a rather poor reputation, in fact it is perceived by many to be one of the weakest Doctor Who stories ever. Is this reputation deserved? Absolutely not in my opinion.

There are some wonderful sets for the towers, in the past Doctor Who sets had been inappropriate because they were so spotlessly clean, in this story the sets look grubby and help to create the impression that Paradise towers is dilapidated and neglected. The sets are assisted by some remarkably effective red, blue and green lighting. Admittedly though some of the sets, the Rezzies' flat for example, are rather over lit.

After a shaky performance in 'Time and the Rani' Sylvester McCoy starts to find his feet as the Doctor and his performance here is on the whole very good. Sadly Bonnie Langford's performance is poor, she's just too cheerful and upbeat (this seems especially unsuitable in the scenes set after she has almost been cannibalised by two old ladies).

It has been suggested that Richard Briers' performance here is a career low. I couldn't disagree more, for the first three episodes Briers gives a very amusing and entertaining performance as the Chief Caretaker (the manner in which he converses with Kroagnon in the basement is especially hilarious). I will admit that Briers goes over the top when portraying Kroagnon in the body of the Chief Caretaker in the last episode, but this is nowhere near as bad as some would have you believe. Clive Merrison gives a good performance as the Deputy Chief Caretaker.

Howard Cooke may be a poor physical fit for the character of Pex (who was supposed to be really muscular) but he gives a strong performance.

Stephen Wyatt's script is full of imaginative ideas and dialogue, for example the Kangs' distinctive dialect. The cannibalistic Rezzies are sublime, Elizabeth Spriggs and Brenda Bruce are simply brilliant in these roles. I also found the Caretakers' blind obedience of the rules amusing, especially in the scene where the Doctor uses this to escape them.

The main monsters in the story are the cleaning robots, in my opinion they look quite good although they do move slowly (something they have in common with most other Doctor Who monsters) and it's difficult to imagine they could do any harm with their implements.

On the DVD there are two complete scores, you can watch the story with Keff McCulloch's score or a rejected score from David Snell, McCulloch's is the better of the two even if it is a bit too upbeat at times. Snell's score is moodier but also quite repetitive.

In conclusion 'Paradise Towers' is very good but by no means perfect.

As for extras, there is 'Horror on the high rise' a 34 minute 'making of' documentary, which is very good. The highlight for me was an interview with Richard Briers.

The other major extra is 'Girls girls girls the 1980's' in which Sarah Sutton, Janet Fielding and Sophie Aldred all talk about their periods on the show. All three have interesting comments and this is very amusing at times. Fielding clearly loathed the outfits that were inflicted on Tegan which is fair enough. This clocks in at 21 minutes and is introduced by Peter Purves for some reason.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Horror on the High Rise!, 22 Sept. 2014
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
"Ice hot, Doctor! Ice hot!"

I really have enjoyed watching `Paradise Towers'! Okay, it's not the greatest `Doctor Who' story ever in the world. But it's a fun story, and I think it is where `Doctor Who' gets really good in terms of story-telling in this one. The story's plot is pretty plausible with lots of concepts and interesting ideas running through it. Sometimes it's difficult to take it seriously with bouts of comedy running through it. But I enjoyed the comedy for the fun of it. The story does have merit, even though some of the ideas weren't executed as well as originally intended.

The story of `Paradise Towers' was written by newcomer to the series Stephen Wyatt. Stephen was commissioned to write this four-part adventure during the making of Sylvester McCoy's first season as the Doctor. The show at the time was made under immense pressure and Sylvester's era had a rocky start following his debut story 'Time and the Rani'. But `Paradise Towers' is a story where the Seventh Doctor era began to pick up and find its feet, even though there was still a lot to do and a long way off before `Doctor Who' could reinvent itself.

In `Paradise Towers', the story has the Doctor and Mel arrive in this high-rise tower block somewhere in the future. Whether it's Earth future somewhere in the 21st century or later than that I do not know. But it's a place where it's supposed to be pure luxury. Mel wants to go to `Paradise Towers' to see the swimming pool as it happens to be the most beautiful and amazing swimming pool ever. However, the place is a shambles and dirt and grime has worn over the years. The tower's inhabitants are also in disarray as it's divided into various groups including the Caretakers, the Kangs, the Rezis and a seemingly strong man named Pex. With people being picked off and taken away by Robot cleaners to be eaten alive by the creature beneath, the Doctor knows there's something more to this derelict tower-block and is determined to solve the mystery of the Great Architect missing for so many years.

I liked how Stephen writes into his story so many themes and concepts to create the world of `Paradise Towers'. Some of ideas don't get executed as well as intended but they're interesting enough. I like how the setting is created with the towers' people in disarray and divided into groups and no-one seems to know and understand why people are being killed off one by one. There's a history about Paradise Towers that gets unraveled layer by layer, and the Doctor learns from the Kangs and Caretakers piece by piece about what's going on and why the tower block's in disarray. The story has a sort of sitcom feel to it. Sometimes there's an overdose of the comic feel and the comedy's overdone by some of the actors. But if you get your head around the comedic absurdness of it all, you have the makings of a pretty good `Doctor Who' story. As well as the comedy, there are also some significant moments of horror that took me by surprise.

I enjoyed watching Sylvester McCoy's Doctor in this. He's not so much the manipulative Seventh Doctor we would come to know in later years. In fact Sylvester has only just started and is trying to find his feet in the role. But he gives a really good performance and becomes very Doctory when interacting with the Kangs and Caretakers and is trying to gather the people together to stop Kroagnon. I like it when the Doctor turns the tables when the Chief Caretaker interrogates him and he interrogates the Chief Caretaker instead. I also like it when he doffs his hat to a `pump' when he and Mel arrive and Mel goes, "No Doctor!"; "Well you never can tell," the Doctor replies.

Bonnie Langford as Mel is okay in this story. I'm afraid Mel does get to scream a lot in this story, and that's all she seems to be remembered for on her time in `Doctor Who' which is a shame as Bonnie is a relatively good actress. Her voice gets scratchy at times during this story which is sometimes annoying. Mel is certainly better in the Big Finish audios with Colin and Sylvester whenever Bonnie appears in them. I like how in this adventure Mel gets separated from the Doctor and has her own adventure meeting the Rezis Tilda and Tabby and also with Hex when they find a way up to the top of the tower. Mel has this strange obsession of going to the swimming pool which I found odd.

The inhabitants of Paradise Towers include the Caretakers; the Kangs; the Rezis and Pex.

The Caretakers are group of military-like guards who take `care' of the conditions of Paradise Towers and abide by their rulebook. Stephen Wyatt originally conceived the Caretakers as elderly men. Instead what we have are youngish fit men who walk around in military uniforms looking like Nazis. When out in force, the Caretakers are usually led by the Deputy Chief Caretaker (Clive Merrison) who sort out the Kangs and are out to capture the Doctor. They're obsessed with abiding by their rulebook and quote specific regulations from it when doing activities within the tower block. There's a scene I like where the Doctor outwits the Deputy Chief Caretaker and his comrade by using the rulebook against them and manages to escape. It's really funny and yet it's so silly as to how the Caretakers can be so easily outwitted and this is where I think the comedy is done too much by this point in the story.

The highlight of this story for me is the casting of Richard Briers as the Chief Caretaker. I love Richard Briers' performance in this story. Richard is well known for his roles in sitcoms including 'The Good Life'; 'Ever Decreasing Circles' and 'Monarch Of The Glen' and would later go on to appear in an episode of the second season of 'Torchwood'. Richard was doing `Ever Decreasing Circles' at the time, and for those who've watched that sitcom, you can see clearly that he's doing an element of Martin Bryce in the character he's playing. He goes "Oh dear, Oh dear." at one point and reacts to his communicator buzzing by saying 'Who did that?' which Martin does which I found funny. There's also an element of Adolf Hitler and wearing a brushy moustache (which in my opinion doesn't suit him). I like the cliff-hanger in `Part 1' where Richard as the Chief Caretaker is seemingly praising the Doctor's return as the Great Architect and then in the end says in that funny low voice, "Kill him." That's got to the most funny and unexpected cliff-hanger ever in the history of `Doctor Who' and made me wonder what's going to happen next and why the Chief Caretaker seems to think the Doctor's the Great Architect. Sometimes it's difficult to take Richard seriously as he's funny throughout. But I love his appearance in this particular `Doctor Who' story.

Of course, I like it when Richard does his performance as the Chief Caretaker in the first three episodes. By the time we get to Part Four, it all goes downhill. The Chief Caretaker gets turned into zombie as Kroagnon takes over his body. Richard does this strange performance where the Chief's taken over and becomes a zombie. He speaks in a very strange voice which is really over-the-top and it's very difficult to take him seriously by this point. I can't help but laugh for the wrong reason. I have to say, meaning no disrespect to Richard, that his zombie performance isn't the highlight of his career. He overplayed that zombie performance where he should have toned it down. To be fair, he has a good stab at it. It's hard to play a zombie, and you can't blame Richard for trying his best. Watching it again, I realised what he was trying to do was just to act like the alien adjusting to the Chief Caretaker. It's such a shame it didn't come across well in his performance.

There are also the Kangs. Red Kangs! "Red Kangs; Red Kangs; Red Kangs, the best!" There's also the Blue Kangs as well as the Yellow Kangs except the last one screams and gets killed at the beginning of the story. These are a group of girl gangs who storm about the tower block looting and getting to find out what's going on within the place. Some of the Kangs have very strange names such as Bin Liner (Annabel Yuresha) and Fire Escape (Julie Brennon). The Blue Kang Leader (Catherine Cusack) doesn't have a name in the story which I found very strange. The Kangs have their own slang words such as `Ice Hot!' which is my favourite and `Build High For Happiness!'. The Doctor and Mel meet the Red Kangs first who seem to like the Doctor and his clothes but not Mel. They call Pex a `cowardly cutlet' and make fun of him whenever he's around. They help the Doctor and Mel to stop Kroagnon and see that nobody gets `unalive' anymore.

There's the Rezis (Residents) of Paradise Towers including Judy Cornwell playing Maddy, who I was delighted to see in this since I remember her for playing Daisy in 'Keeping Up Appearances'. There's also Brenda Bruce playing Tilda (who I remember from 'Jeeves and Wooster' and also in 'Alice Through the Looking Glass' with Sarah Sutton). And there's Elizabeth Springs playing Tabby (who I've seen in plenty of BBC classical dramas and has even made an appearance in one of the `Harry Potter' films). Tilda and Tabby welcome Mel with tea and crumpets and seem really friendly towards her in the first two episodes. But by the end of `Part 2', there's a really frightening cliff-hanger where Tilda and Tabby hold Mel captive with a net over her head as they intend to `eat' her. Now even for a comedy-filled story as this, it's got to be one of the most frightening cliff-hangers in `Doctor Who's' history and must have been frightening for the kids.

And of course there's Pex, played by Howard Cooke. Pex is a muscular young man who's determined to `put Paradise Towers to rights'. He seems to like showing off his strength as he keeps bashing down doors into the Rezis' homes and breaking lamp-stands into a knot. He keeps following Mel as he intends to protect her. But it turns out from the Blue Kangs that Pex is actually a coward and tends to run away at the first sign of trouble. Through the story however, Pex develops into an interesting person and becomes more courageous and gets to save Mel from Tilda and Tabby. I enjoyed watching Pex in this and he gets to make a big sacrifice towards the end and no longer becomes a coward.

In the story, there are these robot cleaners that patrol the corridors of Paradise Towers and picks off people one by one to be delivered as meals to a hungry Kroagnon in the basement. These robots I feel aren't scary enough. The design looks pretty bizarre as they don't seem to be very threatening and can only move one arm in a restricted movement. They trundle a lot down the corridors of Paradise Towers without any sense of urgency and seem to be at their ease. Nice and clean looking, but effectively not the most effective robots in `Doctor Who' in my opinion.

And of course there's Kroagnon, the once Great Architect who lives in the basement of the tower block. This creature has purple glowing eyes that don't look realistic and has a tendency to keep saying `Hungry!' all the time. The Chief Caretaker delivers `food' for his pet and keeps referring to himself as its `daddy'. By the time we're three quarters into the story, Kroagnon reveals its plan to take the Chief Caretaker and return to Paradise Towers to destroy the fleshy filth. Only the Doctor and his friends can stop Kroagnon from carrying out his plans.

I enjoyed the special features on this DVD for `Paradise Towers'.

There's an interesting making-of documentary of `Paradise Towers' called `Horror on the High Rise' that I enjoyed. It's hosted by music composter Mark Ayres and it features interviews with script editor Andrew Cartmel; writer Stephen Wyatt and cast members Richard Briers; Howard Cooke and Catherine Cusack. There are also deleted and extended scenes that cut out from the original edit of the story and there are also some continuity announcements. There's also `Casting Sylvester' which is an interview with producer Clive Doig who talks about how he got Sylvester McCoy to be cast into the role of Doctor Who.

There's also a commentary on `Paradise Towers' with actress Judy Cornwell; writer Stephen Wyatt and special sounds supervisor Dick Mills; and is moderated by Mark Ayres. There's an alternative music soundtrack to play as an option in this story as the music was originally composed by composer David Snell before being replaced by composer Keff McCulloch. There's a photo gallery; a PDF of the Radio Times listing of the story and info-text option commentary to watch during the story. There's also a `coming soon' trailer for the next DVD release `The Sun Makers'.

My favourite highlight of this DVD that got me really excited was `Girls! Girls! Girls: The Eighties'. This is a discussion, introduced by Peter Purves at the beginning, between Sophie Aldred (Ace); Janet Fielding (Tegan) and Sarah Sutton (Nyssa, my favourite companion) who talk about the trials and tribulations of being a `Doctor Who' companion in the 80s. I don't know why this special feature is on this DVD as it's not relevant to `Paradise Towers'. But it didn't matter to me as it's a lovely little treat and I enjoyed watching Sarah interacting with Sophie and Janet on it. I love how Sophie moderates the discussion and is referring between Janet and Sarah; whilst Janet is pretty dominating throughout and Sarah is quietly spoken as she contributes which I liked. I enjoyed the interesting comments Sarah made and am very glad she doesn't regret doing `Doctor Who' back then when she was in it.

`Paradise Towers' is a `Doctor Who' DVD I've immensely enjoyed. As I mentioned in another review for 'Delta and the Bannermen', Season 24 of `Doctor Who' was unusual season of comedic proportions and this story is no exception. If this story was made today, Harry Hill will probably poke a lot of fun on this particular story on his 'TV Burp' show on ITV. There's a sense of it being too comedic and too sitcom-like with over-the-top performances. But I enjoyed the ideas and the world of `Paradise Towers' that Stephen Wyatt created as it's an interesting story with a fairly plausible plot. I enjoyed watching Richard Briers in this story as he's one of my favourite actors, although the character he played wasn't specifically written for him and his performance was good until the end of Part Three. I've written my own personal `Doctor Who' with a Richard Briers-type of character and I think he would have enjoyed that compared to this one. All in all, this is a reasonably good and enjoyable `Doctor Who' stories. Not the best, but certainly lots of fun.

The next story for the Doctor and Mel is 'Bang-Bang-A-Boom!'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Paradise Last, 18 May 2014
By 
Number13 (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
In fact, Paradise Not Quite Last, there are a few `Doctor Who' episodes often thought worse than this. But not many. 2*

`Paradise Towers' is a huge, once luxurious residential complex now fallen into squalor. It would be easy to see this as yet one more political satire on the 1980s, but tower blocks grew from the Utopian idealism of the 1950s; `the people' would be given new, modern homes in futuristic blocks, and they would be happy. But even twenty years before `Paradise Towers' was broadcast, `the people' often weren't happy - one of the stock complaints went along the lines of `those architects build these places but they don't live here themselves'. Be careful what you wish for - in `Paradise Towers' the `Great Architect' does indeed live in the building, and he definitely doesn't like the residents spoiling his vision of concrete perfection ...

So why are the Doctor and Mel in the building at all? Because Mel wants to swim in its pool ... there are worlds out there with effervescent oceans but no it must be this pool. So she goes looking for the pool while the Doctor wanders around the corridors and they both run into odd characters and trouble. Personally I found Mel the most annoying companion ever, a gratingly cheerful and unbearably bubbly character. (For another example of a cheerful, bubbly - but wonderful - companion, see `Jo Grant'.) Sylvester McCoy finds the Seventh Doctor's most humorous side, he's one semi-comic element of the story that works well and it's a contrast with the serious, mysterious Doctor he played later. But he really doesn't have enough to do here.

The building looks great, sets and location filming blending to create a convincingly run-down `paradise' where the problem isn't just the building, it's the people. The retiree residents and girls have been abandoned while most others went off to fight some unspecified war. The residents are hiding in their flats while the girl gangs (`Kangs') roam and battle in the halls. This half works. The `Rezzies' include two wonderfully written and acted comedy cannibal ladies straight out of Hansel and Gretel. And they want to eat Mel, so that wins the viewer over immediately! However, the `Kangs' are cringingly, embarrassingly dire.

Supposedly trying to keep order are the Caretakers (official local authoritarians), their cleaner robots and Pex (unofficial would-be superhero). Again it's 50/50. The Caretakers seem like yet another Nazi parody (Daleks have that one well covered) but a doubtfully comic one; fine actors asked to play unconvincing roles, neither comic nor scary. The cleaner robots look quite good but then move so slowly I thought their batteries must be running down. You'd have to be glued to the floor to be in any danger. Pex is both an amusingly comic send-up of every superhero film you're seen and a strangely poignant character - he's hopeless, desperately pretending to be brave and not very good at that. Faced with a `deadly' pool robot trying to `clean up' Mel, he won't even shoot it from the safety of dry land to save her life. Is he afraid? (Or just a `Doctor Who' fan expressing his opinion ...? (!)) Don't give up on Pex; there could be a hero inside.

So there are some better moments but overall this is a run-down wasteland in the world of `Doctor Who'; a waste of good designs, some fine actors and some good satirical ideas that mostly don't come off: 2* for the sets, the Rezzies, Pex and a likeable comic Doctor. `Paradise Towers' is a fair example of season 24, which I think is the worst in the show's history by some distance, and a sad place to see a show that, ten years earlier, produced one classic story after another. Paradise lost.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Paradise Towers - The Seventh Doctor lost in Paradise, 22 July 2011
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
I remember watching Sixth and Seventh Doctor serials when they were first aired, and not liking them much, especially the start of the Seventh Doctor's reign. I haven't seen them again until the DVD releases, and in general (Time and the Rani, Vengeance on Varos etc) I have reassessed my opinion and found lots to enjoy. This however was just as bad as I remember and time has not improved it.

The set up is interesting - The Doctor and Mel try to go to the fabled Paradise Towers for a holiday. When they get there they find instead of a gleaming modern tower block, the place is a dump. The occupants, who were sealed inside, have split up into various societies and gangs, all warring with each other. It's a fascinating set up, and a really great idea. But that's where it ends. Having had this great idea the script writers then had to find some problem for the Doctor and Mel to resolve, and, frankly, the mystery at the heart of Paradise towers is pretty incomprehensible and pointless. It really feels shoehorned in.

There are a few fun ideas - the officious `Caretakers' and their strict adherence to the rule book, the way the caretakers are all named after regulations and the Kangs all named after wall signs, the `Rezzies' and their strange dining habits. But there is not enough here to flesh out the series. Added to which is a misjudged performance from Richard Briers as the main bad guy, it is just too camp and silly to make him seem like a real threat. The main `monsters', the cleaning robots, are just badly constructed and again so laughable that they give no sense of menace, which this overly humorous series badly needed. And there's Mel. Mercifully her stay with the series was a short one, and this series shows just why she is one of the series least liked companions. It's a shame really, as Bonnie Langford has shown how good the character could have been in her work on the Big Finish audio range. Finally there is the rather disturbing scene with the knife wielding grannies - I found this disturbing as an 11 year old, and I still do today.

Sylvester McCoy is still trying to get to grips with his Doctor's character, and generally does a good job with the material given to him. His performance is pretty much the high point of the series, his physical timing is great and leads to some genuinely humorous moments.

In all an interesting set up which has no room for the Doctor, so goes nowhere. Poor monsters and villains, too much humour and Mel at her worst. Sorry, but I have long considered this to be the worst of all the classic Dr series, so can only give the story 1 star.

On the upside, the DVD from 2Entertain is a great job. The usual informative production subtitles, and a host of special features which are well thought out, interesting, and have a relevance to the story. It's quite a package. The picture and sound have been very nicely restored and presented, someone has put a lot of thought into this package. SO another star for the overall presentation, two stars in total.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seventh Doctor Heaven, 4 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
I realise that I am probably a lone voice in the wilderness that is 80s Dr Who, but I love this. Sure th acting is dodgy, the script is worse, the set is clearly BBC TV centre, and McCoy chews the scenery with every line (until Richard Briers gets going!) but then again, loads of Dr Who stories can have the same criticism levelled at them. I watched this when I was a kid, loved it then. Watched it as an adult, and still love it. Now off to complete my collection of McCoy's seasons.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very weird but fun, 11 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
This has got to be one of the most weid and odd pieces of TV ever made. The story keeps jumping from everyone being friendly and nice, to then two seconds later hating The Doctor and Mel. At one point Mel is just sitting down enjoying a cup of tea and next under the threat to being Murdered by the exact same characters. However all the same it is a bit of fun and enjoyable to watch.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Brilliant Story For Mccoy, 8 Feb. 2015
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
This story has so much going on for this and is such an enjoyable piece of television. I have seen this story three times now and i still enjoy watching it again, its so underrated. The 7th doctor in my opinion is fantastic and just seems to get better and better by each season i would personally recommend any sylvester mccoy story and yes even Delta and The Bannermen.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hyper real!, 22 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
Having lived in a tower block a few years ago I can tell that, if they had locked us all in, things probably would have gone the same way. They only thing that spoils it for me is the bit at the end when Richard Briers paints his face silver and seems to be doing a an impersonation of Frankenstiens monster.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars In Paradise, 17 Sept. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
A good Sylvester McCoy story, if just slightly odd. Richard Briers got to play the pantomime villain with great relish.
This is one of McCoy's better stories. A well acted episode. Would recommend to any Dr Who fan.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hadn't seen this before. Scary. Cannibals, robotic ..., 3 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] (DVD)
Hadn't seen this before. Scary. Cannibals, robotic killer in the pool. Bullying, person you wanted to be a hero and so he was in the end.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987]
Doctor Who - Paradise Towers [DVD] [1987] by Sylvester McCoy (DVD - 2011)
£6.80
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews