Customer Reviews


23 Reviews
5 star:
 (19)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


61 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last! A readable expert book on Java concurrency
Concurrency is hard and boring. Unfortunately, my favoured technique of ignoring it and hoping it will go away doesn't look like it's going to bear fruit. Fortunately, Java 5.0 introduced a new bunch of concurrency utilities, that work at a higher level of abstraction than marking blocks as synchronized and fields as volatile. Unfortunately, there haven't been that many...
Published on 7 Aug 2006 by Thing with a hook

versus
0 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Most confusing book
In a nutshell - it's a pain reading this book. Very poor examples and by far the worst explanation I have ever read. Going through the same sentence again and again and again, for the first few chapters at least, you feel like the author's has been just asked to fill up the pages.

If you manage to get the topics, just google it and I promise you will get better...
Published on 18 Oct 2010 by KR


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

61 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last! A readable expert book on Java concurrency, 7 Aug 2006
Concurrency is hard and boring. Unfortunately, my favoured technique of ignoring it and hoping it will go away doesn't look like it's going to bear fruit. Fortunately, Java 5.0 introduced a new bunch of concurrency utilities, that work at a higher level of abstraction than marking blocks as synchronized and fields as volatile. Unfortunately, there haven't been that many books on the subject - even the good Java 5.0 books (e.g. Head First Java or Agile Java) make little mention of them - Thinking in Java being an honourable exception. Fortunately, JCIP is here, and it is authoritative stuff. And it's (mostly) very easy to understand. Plus, at 350 pages, it's not an enormous chore to slog through. It even covers changes to the upcoming Java 6.

Before tackling this book, you should have at least some idea of pre-Java 5.0 concurrency. You don't need to be a threading master, though, as the first part of the book covers basics like deadlock, atomicity and liveness. This was my favourite part of the book, as it comes with lots of small code snippets, both right and (horribly) wrong, and pithy design guidelines. It's rather like Effective Java in that respect - although the material on threading was probably the weakest part of that book, so this is a definite improvement.

The second part deals with thread pools, cancellation strategies, and GUIs. This is also excellent. Part three covers performance and testing. The last 75 pages are for advanced users and goes into a fair amount of low level detail (including a discussion of the Java Memory Model), which may be of interest to experts only.

I would be lying if I said that reading this book will demystify concurrency completely. Who wrote which bit of the book is unclear (although readers of Effective Java will probably spot parts of the text that seem rather Joshua Blochish), but while it's mostly very clear, some parts of the text are a little murkier than other. Perhaps this is to be expected given the subject matter. But for the most part it's surprisingly easy reading, and very practical to boot.

Let's face it, short of aliens landing and introducing a radically new way of computing, multicores are here for the medium term at least, so thread-dodging wimps such as myself will just have to get used to it. That being so, this book is going to be installed as one of the must-read books in the Java pantheon.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great introduction to Java's concurrency API, 28 Jun 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you are serious about java development you know you can't ignore threads.

Yet, so many skilled developers incredibly passionate about object orientation seem uneasy when confronted with threading-issues.

Is i++ an atomic operation ? Have you ever heard of CopyOnWriteArrayList ?

Do you know how to deal with InterruptedException ?

This is a very readable book which will make sure not only that your code will not deadlock but that you know why.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Up to date blueprints for writing multi-threaded apps., 8 Mar 2009
By 
I would go so far as to say the authors have done a commendable job cracking a tough nut.

By reading the book you will be instilled with a set of blueprints that you can use to code multi-threaded apps and facilitate writing
threaded apps using the latest Java 5 and 6 classes.

Real life analogies were usually given to put problems into perspective at the outset of a new topic.

The book gave examples categorised into three groups. Good, bad and fragile stylised with a smiley, sad and indifferent faces.

For me seeing how not to code is equally valuable, lest you get caught with the same traps.

The book was broken down into four sections:
I Fundamentals
II Structuring Concurrent Applications
III Liveness, Perfomance & Testing
IV Advanced Topics

The book also has a good bibliography for further reading. I particularly found Hans Boehm's article excellent supplementary reading.

I particularly liked coverage of non-blocking synchronisation in chapter 15.

In contrast I found chapter 12 to be the most daunting to get to grips with (Testing Concurrent Apps). I found myself losing the thread in Listing 12-12! (Where a listing boils down to just a method! With undefined variable "barrier". barrier.await() is declared twice in succession! Huh? What's barrier?).
Thank heavens for section 12.4.2. / Findbugs.

jcip.net is the website where you can find the book source and errata.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommend for knowledge on multithreading, 15 Jun 2010
By 
G. Krishnan (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book is definitely a very useful one for people who seek to know more about multithreading in java 1.6

Gives a good introduction. To get the max out of this book one should go slow and practice whats being said when you finish a chapter, otherwise it is very easy to forget / lose what you just read a couple of chapters back.

Could have been printed on a little larger font. One has to read a lot more text in this book than other java programming books.

Most of the chapters are around 20-25 pages. Hence i would recommended you have atleast a couple of hours for each sitting to read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Java multi-threading bible!, 19 Oct 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Just few words...Buy this book! This is one of the best IT-related books I've ever read and indeed one of the best Java books. With an easy-to-read yet thorough 360 degrees approach to concurrency in Java, this book unveils all aspects of Java concurrency, from the basic concepts to advanced ones. Not only it provides an unprecedented bibliography for Java concurrency, but it goes beyond, explaining you concepts such as thread stacks, context switching, the best Java concurrent collections for the job, performance tuning, how to test concurrency programs, etc. By the end of this book I was writing efficient multi-threading applications for investment banking applications. And they worked very well.

M.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read. The best book out there on the java concurrency., 26 Jun 2009
By 
Tommaso Galleri (Leeds, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a very well written book and in my opinion currently the best book on Java concurrency out there. If you are a Java developer, this is a must read. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great reference and cookbook on concurrency, 13 Nov 2014
By 
Michael P (San Diego, CA United States) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the book if you want practical, useful advice on concurrency. It's currently the only book I physically lug to a contract (you only get 20kg these days, even on long haul).

Unlike almost all technical books this one appears to have been thoroughly proof read, as it's largely absent of the usual typos, twisted grammar and Ind-glish style missing articles. Every sentence can be pondered over and found to mean something useful - a trait I haven't seen in a software book since Kernighan & Ritchie.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended!, 25 July 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Definitely recommended... it is though at times, but in general it is instructive and enjoyable... the best book in his category for sure! In addition, most of the topics do not apply to Java only, making a very good general book on concurrency.

Just be aware, in some sections it will made you think "OMG" over mistakes you probably made at some point (and you will have nightmares of your software deadlocking after running fine for 1yr).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive, Up to Date and Accessible, 15 July 2008
By 
G. Gilmour (Belfast N.Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
For any programmer writing or using multi-threaded code this book is a godsend. The writing is clear and accessible, the examples are relevant to day to day development and the coverage is bang up to date. Likely to join Effective Java: A Programming Language Guide (Java Series) as essential reading for Java developers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Clear and util, 3 Jun 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Java Concurrency in Practice (Kindle Edition)
Easy to read and with very good tips.
Perfect to have a very good understanding of how to implement Java programs in a multi-threading environment.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Java Concurrency in Practice
£19.49
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews