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4.4 out of 5 stars92
4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 23 March 2014
This excellent comic novel has been one of my steady "go to" reads for as long as I can remember and will always be one of my very favourite books. The book was authored in the 19th Century by the Grossmith brothers. The "Nobody" of the title is fictional London clerk Mr Charles Pooter, his diary covers just over a year in his life and opens as he and his wife Carrie are settling into their new house in Brickfield Terrace, Holloway. The diary captures in an unfailingly humorous manner the (usually) petty trials and tribulations in his life. You laugh at and often cringe at the frequently pompous and sometimes touchy Mr Pooter however, you also love him dearly.

He brings his trivial squabbles with servants and tradesmen, occasional humiliations suffered at social events to such vivid life. His relationships with his long-suffering but loyal wife Carrie and his clever but worrying son Lupin plus his friends, colleagues and acquaintances are just so wonderfully drawn and are actually very insightful. Truly brilliant!

As well as laughter the book provides a valuable slice of social history, as the reader gets a glimpse into the lives of a lower middle-class Victorian family.

A perfect 5* read.
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on 4 October 2013
This was a very enjoyable holiday read whose main effect for me was to mark out the differences that have taken place over the last 140 years in the attitudes and customs of demotic London man. It was written as a contemporary commentary so presumably can be trusted as an accurate reflection of the trappings and mores of those times.

Boot scrapers, blue omnibuses, box carts, tradesmen who come to the door, delivery boys, musical evenings all feature. Perhaps as striking are the similarities. Having worked in the City for 25 years, I can say that, while the technology may have changed, the hierarchical relationships, the social climbing and the exclusive institutions remain depressingly familiar 140 years on.

Pooter is engagingly accident-prone, not only in the physical world but also in his social dealings. Perhaps my biggest surprise was the forthright and self-assertive way in which people spoke to one another then. We seem to be much more woossy about this sort of thing these days and reserve our real vitriol for electronic communications.
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on 20 January 2015
I have just read this for the second time, and I enjoyed it just as much on second reading. It really made me smile.

Although written in the 1890s the humour works well. Here are the wonderfully understated observations of the dull suburban life and limited values of Pooter, the nobody of the title. There is scope for a good TV sit-com here.
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on 14 December 2013
This is one of those charming books that isn't great literature but is very well written. 'Nobody' is a middle aged, respectable clerk with a healthy respect for the social order. He is often baffled by modern attitudes, particularly those of his son, Lupin. Nevertheless, he perseveres in his respectable life, enduring the trials and tribulations of ironmongers, butchers and laundresses, and everything works out almost as expected.

It's a nice commentary on lower middle class life at the turn of the 20th century. It has some very funny moments and is very enjoyable. I ended up wishing it was a bit longer!
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on 15 August 2015
Hilariously funny. Anyone with an interest in journal writing, or the self-deprecating humour of English social mores would find this bemusing reading. And coming as a free Kindle, it's a double treat. Don't expect anything of gravity or philosophy here, just enjoy the views of society from the perspectives of a London city clerk of yester years.
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on 15 February 2015
Very intertaining. A relaxing read that you get caught up in. Good fun light reading.
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on 15 December 2012
Fast Kindle delivery enabled me to read what I had long intended to buy. It was one of my first experiences of Kindle Fire reading and a very enjoyable, humorous one. The English love to debunk pomposity and this book certainly does not disappoint! Good entertainment and, since I believe it cost me nothing, what more could I say????
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on 8 September 2013
VERY FUNNY A MUST READ! Who said books from another century cannot entertain? I think this should be on the reading list for secondary schools to show that old texts carry many of the same messages as more modern writers but the crafting was achieved in a different way! Entertain yourself by having a read!
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on 11 March 2015
The funniest book I have EVER read! And also in its own way, the saddest.
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on 2 June 2015
I really enjoyed this book. Took a bit of searching to find it wasn't a factual book. Pity no more was written on these characters. They felt real. The style and grammar felt like it was written yesterday. Would love to see the film; I imagine it would feel like Goodbye Mr Chips.
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