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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Do you enjoy a book that makes you think?
This is the kind of book that I really enjoy because so often I wanted to stop and think about the information it gives you. There is something ironic about that, as you will discover if you read 'Incognito,' as you learn how little you do is actually governed by conscious thought!

The book is an easy read for a serious, factual book but impeccably based in a...
Published on 19 May 2011 by Malcolm L

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Half brilliant
The first half of this book is amazing - full of fascinating insights. There's so much good stuff, he nearly throws away one of the best and simplest theories into why we dream. It's probably worth buying for the first half alone. However in the second half he moves into the philosophy of crime and punishment. While the first half of the book is peppered with all his...
Published 6 months ago by Matt P


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and helpful!, 9 Aug 2011
By 
Cazzandra (Guildford UK) - See all my reviews
This is a wonderful book. It is lively and well written with lots of everyday examples and explanations to make difficult concepts easy to understand. You need zero knowledge of the brain or psychology to follow the arguments. Best of all there are plenty of examples and 'tests' so you can see for yourself exactly what he means.

Eagleman is extremely honest about what he is pretty sure he knows, what he thinks he knows and stuff he is speculating about. I liked the way it was written for a non-specialist audience but at the same time any students or academics reading it are given plenty of resources and references to follow up. It is rare to find a book that covers such a difficult topic so well and for all kinds of audiences.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Interesting read, 17 May 2011
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This book throws new light on the workings of the human mind and is a very interesting and easily readable introduction to the subject.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 2 May 2011
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A. J. Lornie (West Sussex, England) - See all my reviews
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David Eagleman writes with such flair and enthusiasm; he can make any subject accessible. This book is a must read for anyone who wishes to have an insight to the workings going on in the engine room. It is brilliant.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating to discover how little free thought (of actions) we actually have., 26 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Incognito: The Secret Lives of The Brain (Kindle Edition)
A very interesting book. But by half way through I was running out of stamina to complete and I haven't.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I wrote this review of my own volition (at least I think I did), 23 Mar 2013
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GillianBC (Buckinghamshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Incognito: The Secret Lives of The Brain (Kindle Edition)
This book brought to mind the oft quoted phrase 'My name is legion for we are many'. David Eagleman explains how our mind is the sum of a myriad of parts and that conscious thought is the tip of the iceberg. Whether you are asleep and dreaming, under the influence of medication or feeling compos mentis and browsing Amazon, these are all facets of the person that is you. How much actual free will do you have when part of you wants to eat the chocolate cake and part of you wants to stick to your diet? How much of our existence is governed by unconscious 'zombie processes'? This is a fascinating study of the inner workings of the mind and almost philosophical in parts. Highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars quite interesting, 16 Sep 2012
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this book explains how the human brain and our subconscious works and how little control we actually have over what we see and think. its well written and very well researched but i did find it dragged slightly in places.overall though i did enjoy it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rated and recommended, 15 Sep 2012
I borrowed Incognito from my daughter to read on holiday. She had been lent it by a friend. I've since recommended it,quoted from it and just bought a copy to give away. I found it absolutely fascinating - the central theme is are we in control or are our brains controling us. Now a couple of months since I read it the bits that stick with me are the case of a man who murdered his wife (amongst others) and kept a diary saying he didn't know why he was doing it. The post mortem found he had a tumour on the brain. Less macabre and more relevant to us all is the way we learn - taking in information which adjusts our perceptions so we do things differently next time. Less about being right and wrong and more about a lifelong journey. What's not to like?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and intuitive, 20 July 2012
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This review is from: Incognito: The Secret Lives of The Brain (Kindle Edition)
Fascinating and intuitive - brings the whole present concept of crime and punishment into a new light. Still trying to figure out the implications. A must read....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read., 1 July 2012
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An excellent book with fascinating insights into brain function and the notion of free choice. Deserves to be widely read and then read again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Facinating insight, 30 Jun 2012
By 
Hayley Clark (UK) - See all my reviews
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I really enjoyed this book. I heard the author being interviewed on the radio where he was speaking about his new book and it sounded really interesting.

The explanations and analogies are easy to understand and in many circumstances relate to but are not so simply put so as to be patronising. The book really makes you think and eager to explore more of what makes us tic. The fact that our sub conscious brain has the far greater play in our lives than our conscious is succinctly explained and once you grasp this it makes understanding how and why things have happened in our individual lives so much clearer.

The author does devote a fair proportion of the book to his goal of change in the (American) justice system to reflect that the subconscious decisions are by definition out of the control of a lot of the criminals and this part of the book did go on a tad too much to hold my interest but I fully appreciate that this is an area that the author feels passionate about and which likely drives his further investigations into the workings of our brains in general.

In summary a book well worth reading if you are into the factual rather than just more psychological theorys.
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