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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great author and wonderful writing
As a fan of Daniels other titles I couldn't wait to get my hands on this, his brand new series. As you'd expect the writing is crisp, the characters memorable and they stand out as a cast that have learned from their pasts and try to influence their futures for their own betterment. It's cleverly done and when war is in the offing, it matters not how much you try to do...
Published on 18 April 2011 by Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog

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3.0 out of 5 stars A somewhat slow start but showing a great deal of potential
Hmmm... what to say about this book? The truth is I don't really know.

It basically boils down to the fact that I enjoyed it and want to read the next book but I can't for the life of me tell you why.

The pace is quite slow, the plot is split over at least four POV characters and at the end of the novel I only really just began to get a sense that...
Published 2 months ago by GOTTON


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great author and wonderful writing, 18 April 2011
By 
Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
As a fan of Daniels other titles I couldn't wait to get my hands on this, his brand new series. As you'd expect the writing is crisp, the characters memorable and they stand out as a cast that have learned from their pasts and try to influence their futures for their own betterment. It's cleverly done and when war is in the offing, it matters not how much you try to do to avoid it, you'll always be drawn in one way or another.

Add to this crisp prose, some great descriptiveness and some magical abilities and afflictions that will make this book stand out for quite some time. Finally as this tale unfurls the reader may find themselves slightly confused as the multitude of cultures populating this small world but each adds a unique flavour as well as perspective upon not only the frailty of the conditions within but also a deeper flavour to help bring this world alive. Wonderfully done and I'll look forward to the next part.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Character driven Epic Fantasy, 22 May 2012
This is an epic fantasy novel. It has a lot of the same plot points and characters that inhabit normal old Europe fantasy settings. What really is the twist here is that action is never really front and center. This is a character study in the realm of epic fantasy.

Daniel Abraham has never gotten to be a big player in fantasy. His books are not for everyone. I think this will remain true for "The Dagger and the Coin" as well. When people read Game of Thrones they know battles are coming. The sense of danger around every corner. I never got that while reading "The Dragon's Path". I instead was really caught up with the characters and their interactions. This isn't for fantasy lovers who are looking for blood.

What really makes this novel is the characters. They grow in the right places. They are stubborn in the right places. They feel real. The world they inhabit is good. I can't say the world feels that deep yet, but this is book 1. One of the best compliments I can pay this book is that I cannot say that I have a favorite character. Every time the POV would change I was delighted to be reading that characters perspective. That is rare in this type of material. Usually there is a character I don't want and characters I can't wait to get back to. Not so here. Add all this up, and add in a great ending, with a cool twist, and you have a really special story.

If everything I have described sounds like a breath of fresh air then you should but it. If the fact that big battles are not the focal point then I think that your dollars would be better spent on other books. For me I loved this novel. I can't wait to start digging into the second book!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great start to a series, I think I like it more than the Long Price books, 4 Jan 2013
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This review is from: The Dragon's Path: Book 1 of the Dagger and the Coin (Kindle Edition)
I'd read and quite liked Daniel Abraham's Long Price series but the reviews for this didn't seem as good and I never got round to reading it. Recently I got bored and decided to give it a go and I'm glad I did. The book is structured with each chapter following a particular character (like the Game of Thones series). I often find this becomes annoying as certain characters are inevitably more interesting than others. I found that to be less of a case in this book, with characters been very different but generally equally interesting. I still found the odd chapter annoying but never found myself wanting to skip an entire character. I especially liked the ending (even if the reveal was fairly obvious from early in the book) and am very much looking forward to reading the next book(s) in the series.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent characterization, 10 Feb 2013
The Dragon's Path follows four main protagonists: Geder, a noble in military service, Cithrin, the determined ward of a bank threatened by invasion, Marcos the military hero who's chequered past leads him to take Cithrin under his wing and Dawson, a noble conspiring to protect his King against traitors and rebellion.

All four of them are all flawed in some way creating interesting situations as their story's develop.
Cithrin is an orphan with a flair for business, coming into adulthood, she begins to see sex as a way to gain information and turns to alcohol when things start to go wrong for her. Her part is not the most compelling but the characters around her keep the story from becoming flat.

Marcus is more straightforward, the ex-hero who lost loved ones and becomes closed when coming into contact with others, aside from Yardem, his trustworthy Tralgu... His best moments are with Master Kit, a troupe leader with a lot of charisma and a hidden identity.

My two favorite characters were Geder and Dawson. Dawson is a stubborn nobleman believing in the higher calling of aristocracy, his plans to save his friend the King and the monarchy seemed doomed to failure, but the political intrigue was a stand out feature of the book for me. His family entourage is composed of a great supporting cast including his wife, bodyguard and sons. Geder is a young outcast dreamer, sent to war but he'd much prefer to read a book. A low born noble Geder is the butt of the company jokes until his fortunes take a better turn. His storyline is both fun, horrific and distressing to follow. He ends up being the saviour of the kingdom but equally he could lead to its doom.

This is the first novel by Daniel Abraham that I have read although I have had the Long Price quartet on my to read shelf for quite some time now. This story centres on excellent characterisation, not a great deal of action and I will defiantly read the second book in the series to see where Geder's storyline goes.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very enjoyable, 3 Jan 2013
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This review is from: The Dragon's Path: Book 1 of the Dagger and the Coin (Kindle Edition)
Very different from the previous books he's written but cracking nevertheless.

Very much looking forward to reading the next one.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A somewhat slow start but showing a great deal of potential, 21 Aug 2014
Hmmm... what to say about this book? The truth is I don't really know.

It basically boils down to the fact that I enjoyed it and want to read the next book but I can't for the life of me tell you why.

The pace is quite slow, the plot is split over at least four POV characters and at the end of the novel I only really just began to get a sense that something might actually be starting to happen. All of these things together would normally make me dislike a book but it didn't put me off here... why?

Well I think it is probably because Daniel Abraham is a very talented writer. All of his characters felt real, his world was well realised and once I had become immersed in the story there was nothing that happened which would kick me out of his world back to this one. There were characters that were not as interesting as other characters, but none that I disliked reading about or made me want to skip ahead. All this together made this a comfortable book to keep reading even if it did lack that sense of pace I normally look for in a good book.

I am not a fan of stories that start with such a large number of POV characters as I normally like to get to know one or two primary characters and then layer others in later on. The reason why I am not a fan of this is apparent here, it takes a long time to grow attached to each of the characters and really immerse yourself in their stories which makes for slow reading at first. However, by the end of the novel I finally began to start enjoying each POV and more importantly I think I put my finger on what was good about this novel... the potential.

Each story arc introduced a different element into the overarching story and all of them were dripping with potential for a future and more interesting story line. Whether that may be the possible return of dragons, some kind of mass threat by some magical, religious cult or maybe just a war of some kind, the groundwork was laid here in this first novel.

Overall I am of mixed opinions. Taken on its own I thought the novel was too slow and a bit lacking in a lot of areas. However, taken as part of a new series then I have some new hopes for better things to come. So, bring on the next book and lets see what this series has to offer and if it can live up to its potential.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The potential is there, but the execution was a little flat, 2 May 2011
By 
Patrick St-Denis "editor of Pat's Fantasy Hot... (Laval, Quebec Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Mea culpa: Although I own every volume part of Daniel Abraham's The Long Price Quartet, I have yet to read the first installment. Hence, this would be my first foray into the author's long form works. I absolutely loved Leviathan Wept and Other Stories last summer, and I was thus looking forward to reading the opening chapter in The Dagger and the Coin sequence.

Though certain facets of The Dragon's Path show a lot of promise and potential, I had mixed feelings about the novel as a whole when I reached the last page.

The worldbuilding is at times brilliant, but this aspect also leaves much to be desired in other instances. The entire back story regarding dragons and their fallen empire was utterly fascinating, and I wish we could have learned more about it. The many vestiges of the dragons' civilization definitely added depth to this tale, hinting at countless secrets from the past left to be discovered. Another concept which could have been interesting but turned out to be a failure to launch was the various races. For reasons that remain unexplained, humanity is now split into thriteen different races, all of them born from the Firstblood mold. Problem is, other than disparate physical traits, it appears that humanity, as a whole or sundered in its myriad forms, has no history, mythology, and religion; nothing to give each of the races its identity as a society. So much had been made concerning the thirteen races prior to the book's release that I was persuaded that this would set The Dragon's Path apart from the competition. I was expecting a panoply of diverse cultures, all with their own traditions and beliefs. Sadly, the total absence of depth in that regard -- thus far -- was a definite letdown.

The politicking isn't polished enough, I felt, and in the end everything seemed a bit too contrived for my taste. In terms of court intrigue, not every author can be as talented as George R. R. Martin or Katherine Kurtz. And yet, if a good chunk of your premise depends on this, then the politicking needs to be up to snuff.

The characterization did nothing for me, unfortunately. Which is odd, given the fact that it's not because the story isn't populated by well-defined protagonists. Most characters are nicely realized men and women, each with his or her own back story. But for some reason -- and God knows I've tried to put my finger on it in the last two weeks -- the characters all left me indifferent. Which doesn't really bode well for me. One must give Daniel Abraham credit for playing with our own preconceptions of fantasy stereotypes. The author managed to mix things up by using popular genre tropes, only to turn the table on the readers later on. Still, Marcus was never able to rise above the clichéd warrior who has seen enough of violence. The same can be said of Dawson, the typical nobleman. Though she did nothing for me as a character, Cithrin's storylines is likely the most interesting of the bunch. Abraham tackling commerce and everything it encompasses as an arc shows a lot of promise. The most intriguing character remains the Apostate, and I'm curious to see how his plotline will influence the rest of the series.

The pace is a bit uneven here and there, yet the novel's narrative flows well for the most part. The prose doesn't grab hold of you the way I anticipated, but it does create a vivid imagery.

The structure of the book follows that of George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire. Instead of regular chapter, the book is divided in POV sections. The Dragon's Path features the points of view of Marcus, Geder, Cithrin, Dawson and his wife Clara, as well as that of the Apostate.

All in all, though it might not be the sort of opening chapter I was expecting, The Dragon's Path shows a lot of potential. Whether or not Daniel Abraham can up his game in the second installment remains to be seen. Yet, as many have pointed out, The Long Price Quartet got better and better with each new volume, so here's to hoping that it will be the case here as well.

Though The Dragon's Path is a solid effort, in several aspects the execution fell a little flat.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, 15 Dec 2013
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This review is from: The Dragon's Path: Book 1 of the Dagger and the Coin (Kindle Edition)
Very much enjoyed, great fantasy as usual from Abraham, will definitely buy the next book in the series to continue the story
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars impossible to put down, 21 July 2013
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This review is from: The Dragon's Path: Book 1 of the Dagger and the Coin (Kindle Edition)
I picked up this book because it featured on a list of great fantasy books, and I was not disappointed. Despite the core theme being about banking (!), Abraham has set up a rising tide of anticipation with strong and vibrant characters, ending this book leaving me desperate to get home and download the next one. If you enjoy a good fantasy, with complex characters who are wholly human in their mix of altruism and greed, then this is for you.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great start to a new Fantasy series., 26 Jun 2011
By 
Neil J. Pearson (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This is a new fantasy series by the author of the excellent "long price" quartet. Initially it sounds as if this world is a lot closer to traditional fantasy than his previous series but aside from the 13 races, this is a fantasy world that's more medieval than magical. The funny thing is that a lot of fans were worried this would be too fantastical compared to the "long price" but in reality it's on a similar level although Daniel is always going to be hard-pressed to beat the concept of the "andat". This means that the author focuses on the characters and the story largely grows out of them, although there is the set up of an overall narrative occurring too. The POV characters are strong and distinct and most of them carry a separate thread of story although some of them overlap in places. I enjoyed the Dawson and Marcus characters the most as they were the more mature and it was nice to see how the author writes different ages so well as the younger POV characters are a lot more rash and dare i say it, annoying. In fact, one character does something which really turns the story on its head and I suspect it may well polarize readers. I thought it was a bold move but felt as though it did come out of nowhere and left me confused that a "nice" person committed a horrific act. It does look as if this character will have a particularly dark role in the series though.
Daniel also pulls his usual trick of making a couple of his supporting characters absolute stars and it's impressive that he can do this without getting into their heads

What makes this book a little different is that it does focus a good chunk of the story on finance as a weapon and force of stability. Some may find this "dull" compared to the standard "powermad warrior race/revenge" motivator but it's a realistic approach that i found fairly novel. As the series is called "the dagger and the coin", I guess this aspect of the book will continue to be a strong presence and I think this could be what makes the series a little bit different from other fantasy books.
Mention should also be made of Abraham's writing style which is a joy throughout. One of those authors where the way he says things is often more important than what he is actually saying. I also like how he doesn't go out of his way to be grim and gritty and shocking, as there are plenty of other authors who have that market cornered at the moment.

The main criticism of the book is the lack of a glossary explaining the 13 races. While it doesn't ruin the book it does serve as a minor irritation when I couldn't remember what the race looked like and it's hierarchy. A nitpicky criticism is that this book is also littered with typos as well even character names are mispelled within some pages. Neither things spoil the enjoyment of the story though, unless those things particularly irritate a reader.
This is a great start to what could turn out to be a major fantasy series and I'll be checking out the rest of the series.
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