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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mad? Vindictive more like. But still epically good, 7 Jun 2011
By 
Supertzar - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This for me has always been Ozzy's solo masterpiece. The album has it all: superb, ambitious songwriting, timeless production, musical light and shade (operatic solos, classical arpeggios and country twangs alongside ear-splitting metal) plus some of Ozzy's career-best vocals. I got it on original release and it was years before I heard the background to Ozzy's finest hour: Main songwriter and bassist Bob Daisley was sacked just as the album was finished, along with drummer Lee Kerslake. Neither was mentioned on the album sleeve, instead new recruits Rudy Sarzo and Tommy Aldridge were credited and pictured. Daisley was never paid valuable production or performance fees and to cap it all, the remastered 2002 CDs removed all traces of Daisley's superb bass playing (his Believer and Tonight intros are gorgeous) as well as Kerslake's perfectly pitched drumming - his crime being to side with Daisley in their dispute.

Needless to say, the 2002 remasters were a travesty and Ozzy's vandalism of his own career-best was scorned by all of his non-reality show fans. This clearly wounded Oz and the low-point of his otherwise great autobiography was, for me, his shabby attempt to excuse his treatment of his band mates, which he'd previously blamed on Sharon. The news of this re-remastered edition (ie restoring the original bass and drums) had me thinking there must have been some kind of reconciliation. Maybe now, we'd have the full mea culpa alongside some words of rapprochement with Ozzy's best collaborator outside Sabbath. No such luck sadly: there are no photos of Daisley or Kerslake, no 'making of' story, no discussion of the feuds, bad behaviour or lessons learned. Daisley and Kerslake have apparently not even been consulted over this release, so presumably they still won't get paid for their contribution. 'Glories overdue' as Daisley aptly put it in 'You Can't Kill Rock and Roll'

Politics aside, how does this 2011 remaster sound? Utterly superb is the answer. If anything, Daisley's original bass is more prominent, which makes the whole album sound less dated and 80s. I've listened to this release on a variety of stereos and it sounds as exciting and vibrant as it did back in 1981. Ozzy's vocals, Randy's searing and chilling lead licks, Bob and Lee's perfectly matched rhythm backing and the array of non-metal contributions (country slide and classical guitar, Johnny Cook's uncredited keyboards, the Orffian-chorus in the title track) all sound crystal clear. As do the odd timing fluff, which is a testament to its gloriously analogue heritage.

So what about the bonus CD? Well, it seems to be drawn from various dates on the 1981 tour, but more than that it's difficult to say. The sound isn't as good as the Tribute album - hence why that gig was released originally I suppose. Sadly, the setlist is the same as Tribute, just without No Bone Movies. It would have been good to hear the 1981/82 live versions of Over the Mountain, Rock'n'Roll Doctor, You Lookin' At Me Lookin' At You or Back Street Kids, but given the high notes in those tracks, maybe Ozzy wasn't happy with his pitching. He's on great form on the released tracks though - even if there's the whiff of re-recording on at least some of the vocals. Randy Rhoads is simply possessed - absolutely on fire. Tommy Aldridge's drumming is less subtle than Lee Kerslake's, I could probably have lived without hearing another of his take-no-prisoners 4 minute drum solos.

A great and long overdue restoration of a classic then. I hope one day Ozzy will be man enough to right some of his (or Sharon's) past wrongs. In the meantime, just stick this on and revisit Ozzy's glorious post-Sabbath peak.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The original classic, plus extras, 9 Jun 2011
By 
Stuart Neville (Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Just to counter the one star review from someone who admits they haven't actually heard or purchased this CD, I thought I'd better chip in. I've always been an Eddie Van Halen rather than a Randy Rhoads fan, and never got into the Ozzy albums in my younger years. In recent times I've wanted to hear what all the fuss was about but couldn't bring myself to buy the rerecorded versions of the first two albums, so I was very glad to see the arrival of proper reissues of the original recordings. At last a chance to hear what pretty much every classic rock fan considers to be key touchstones of the genre.

I was already familiar with many of the tracks from the Tribute album, and I have to say, they sound great here. Punchy and dynamic, as heavy as you want, and crystal clear. Great songs and great performances, there isn't a weak track in sight.

The included live album is a very nice addition, and to my ears, it actually sounds quite a bit beefier than Tribute, with more girth to Rhoads's guitar.

All in all, an excellent remaster of an excellent album. If only the horrible remasters of the 70s ZZ Top albums could get the same treatment...
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More vindictive than mad, but still epically good!, 31 Jan 2012
By 
Supertzar - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Diary Of A Madman (Audio CD)
This for me has always been Ozzy's solo masterpiece. The album has it all: superb, ambitious songwriting, timeless production, musical light and shade (operatic solos, classical arpeggios and country twangs alongside ear-splitting metal) plus some of Ozzy's career-best vocals. I got it on original release and it was years before I heard the background to Ozzy's finest hour: Main songwriter and bassist Bob Daisley was sacked just as the album was finished, along with drummer Lee Kerslake. Neither was mentioned on the album sleeve, instead new recruits Rudy Sarzo and Tommy Aldridge were credited and pictured. Daisley was never paid valuable production or performance fees and to cap it all, the remastered 2002 CDs removed all traces of Daisley's superb bass playing (his Believer and Tonight intros are gorgeous) as well as Kerslake's perfectly pitched drumming - his crime being to side with Daisley in their dispute.

Needless to say, the 2002 remasters were a travesty and Ozzy's vandalism of his own career-best was scorned by all of his non-reality show fans. This clearly wounded Oz and the low-point of his otherwise great autobiography was, for me, his shabby attempt to excuse his treatment of his band mates, which he'd previously blamed on Sharon. The news of this re-remastered edition (ie restoring the original bass and drums) had me thinking there must have been some kind of reconciliation. Maybe now, we'd have the full mea culpa alongside some words of rapprochement with Ozzy's best collaborator outside Sabbath. No such luck sadly: there are no photos of Daisley or Kerslake, no 'making of' story, no discussion of the feuds, bad behaviour or lessons learned. Daisley and Kerslake have apparently not even been consulted over this release, so presumably they still won't get paid for their contribution. 'Glories overdue' as Daisley aptly put it in 'You Can't Kill Rock and Roll'

Politics aside, how does this 2011 remaster sound? Utterly superb is the answer. If anything, Daisley's original bass is more prominent, which makes the whole album sound less dated and 80s. I've listened to this release on a variety of stereos and it sounds as exciting and vibrant as it did back in 1981. Ozzy's vocals, Randy's searing and chilling lead licks, Bob and Lee's perfectly matched rhythm backing and the array of non-metal contributions (country slide and classical guitar, Johnny Cook's uncredited keyboards, the Orffian-chorus in the title track) all sound crystal clear. As do the odd timing fluff, which is a testament to its gloriously analogue heritage.

A great and long overdue restoration of a classic then. The Legacy edition Diary Of A Madman (Legacy Edition) adds a disc of live tracks that largely overlap Tribute, albeit with poorer sound. I hope one day Ozzy will be man enough to right some of his (or Sharon's) past wrongs. In the meantime, just stick this on and revisit Ozzy's glorious post-Sabbath peak.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars unbelievable..., 10 Jun 2011
By 
Martin B. Phillips (camborne, cornwall) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
ok, here goes...
first and foremost, this is ozzy's greatest album and though it maybe 30 years old, it still totally stands up as his finest effort. a great band with one of the greatest rock guitarists ever. this album IS the original recordings remastered not the spiteful (sharon ordered) re-recordings of 2002.
the bonus live concert is worth paying for alone as it really is fantastic. this could be re-released every year and will probably always make my album of the year.
i love ozzy but a steady decline ensued after this (although i love the jake e lee era too)mind you, how do you top this???
blizzard of ozz, diary and tribute... god bless you randy rhoads....
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moved to tears, 20 Oct 2013
By 
Alan Frehley - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Diary Of A Madman (Audio CD)
The perfection of Randy Rhoads playing will never be bettered. I thank God for the brief time he had and the legacy he left. This album is perfection personified. The bonus live disc, whilst fantastic, falls short of the excellent Tribute CD, but its still an essential collection.
The ONLY small gripe I have is the album cover which is pretty ropey. The songs, however, are just amazing, with Randys' solo on 'SATO' and jumping straight into the neo-classical acoustic intro of 'Diary of a madman' moving me emotionally as its THAT good. I must give credit to Max Norman who co-produced the album.
Its been widely accepted that this was a rush-recording with demos of Randy's playing left on instead of re-recording them.....just imagine how this epic could have been bettered!
Get past the pantomime that is Ozzy Osbourne this past decade, get past the continual money-grabbing issues that is Sharon, and play this album. You won't regret it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gets better with age, 5 Aug 2011
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I brought this album on vinyl, when it came out 30 years ago, and figured it was about time i updated. This album just keeps sounding better the more i listen to it. The bonus disc features 11 live tracks Showing just how well Ozzy and Randy Rhoads worked together. A brilliant album, that any diehard Ozzy fan would be glad to own.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Diary of a madman, 10 Dec 2004
This review is from: Diary of a Madman (Audio CD)
More polished than blizard of ozz. This is when his career was starting to take off, big production, new band members. Some outstanding tracks, tonight! ozzy at his best, you can't kill rock n roll, then sato (of which he dosent like), If you want ozzy and randy at there rawest listen to blizzard, then step into this c.d all good stuff!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Randy Rhoads at his absolute best, 21 Nov 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Diary of a Madman (Audio CD)
It is unquestionable that Ozzy Osbourne is the as Mick Mars puts it "The Godfather of modern metal". But one cannot deny that in unison with his voice to be placed at such high a status he has been aided some of the best guitarists around. In Sabbath he had the Riff Master Tony Iommi and in this his first (and my opinion best incarnation of his solo band) he has Randy Rhoads. The solo in the middle of "Over The Mountain" is unparalleled (did you ever see Zakk Wylde play it?) and the mixture of classical and true heavy virtues present in the title track is sorely missed in the glam metal days of Jake E Lee and Rudy Sarzo. Throw in a fuzz bass led "Believer" and truly underrated tracks such as "S.A.T.O" and "Little Dolls" and you hace an album which perhaps even rivals "Blizzard..." Well perhaps...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Album, 16 April 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Diary of a Madman (Audio CD)
For me, possibly Ozzy's finest record until "No more tears". Randy Rhoads is just excellent. Flying High Again, You Can't Kill Rock n Roll, Tonight, and the title track (where the classical influence shines through)are just awesome, showing just how good Ozzy and Randy were together. The partnership is sadly missed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The best Ozzy album ever probably, 2 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Diary of a Madman (Audio CD)
I can't really say too much about this album.
It speaks for itself.
It is just so ******** great.
It is ageless, timeless and sounds amazing. Played loud it just does what you want it to do.
This album blew my mind when it first came out and it still does all these years later.
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Diary Of A Madman
Diary Of A Madman by Ozzy Osbourne (Audio CD - 2011)
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