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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Introduction to Assembly Language on Linux
Definitely a first book for assembly language programming, this is a valuable and gentle introduction that's useful new and seasoned programmers alike (the latter will want to skip or skim read some of the early chapters, particularly Chapter 2's coverage of different number bases). By the time you tackle the first actual program, you've read enough to feel confident in...
Published on 7 Jun 2010 by Daniel Woods

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tries to simplify, gets it totally wrong!
I love Linux. I'm interested in Assembly. I didn't want an overly complex book. What could go wrong?

Consider this book also aims at teaching people assembly as their first programming language.

The authors tone, his prose, his everything, is way too chatty. You can't absorb it all because it's way too much "fluff", and he drifts way too far from...
Published on 20 Jan 2012 by J. Davies


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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Introduction to Assembly Language on Linux, 7 Jun 2010
By 
Daniel Woods (East Kilbride, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Definitely a first book for assembly language programming, this is a valuable and gentle introduction that's useful new and seasoned programmers alike (the latter will want to skip or skim read some of the early chapters, particularly Chapter 2's coverage of different number bases). By the time you tackle the first actual program, you've read enough to feel confident in understanding what's going on. The later chapters are well paced, progressing through memory addressing, the stack layout for Linux processes, debugging, calling functions written in C, and brief coverage of the GNU assembler syntax (the Intel syntax used by NASM is used elsewhere).

What you won't find is much material on optimisation, or exhaustive coverage of the x86 instruction set. Neither are appropriate for the introductory level of this book, and its focus remains clear as a result.

If there was one thing that I'd like to have seen, it'd be calling assembly language routines from C, but it's a reasonable omission given that it's a book on assembler and not C.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tries to simplify, gets it totally wrong!, 20 Jan 2012
By 
J. Davies - See all my reviews
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I love Linux. I'm interested in Assembly. I didn't want an overly complex book. What could go wrong?

Consider this book also aims at teaching people assembly as their first programming language.

The authors tone, his prose, his everything, is way too chatty. You can't absorb it all because it's way too much "fluff", and he drifts way too far from fact. This builds up into paragraphs, pages, and even chapters of unnecessary baggage. If you actually know a little about computers, you're told to skip the first 3-4 chapters.

- worst analogy of program flow and 'recipe' I've ever seen in a book. It actually makes things more complex, all that waffling on.
- author explains binary and hexadecimal via pages and pages on his own made up system "foobidty", "foobidtyfoo".
- will make you feel you're not getting anywhere, as it's like reading a novel.
- you don't actually get to do anything until about half way through the book.
- you'll read pages and pages of worthless information that amount to nothing

Ultimately enduring the authors long-winded explanations on concepts will leave you wanting to cry, even if you are a true beginner on programming and computers in general. You'll find yourself having to concentrate more on long-winded analogies, reading half of the book before you even write something in assembly, and then enduring the latter half with the same waffle will make you want to end it all.

I recommended reading the preview here on amazon or the author's site before picking this up.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A very difficult topic, 3 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Assembly Language Step-by-Step: Programming with Linux (Kindle Edition)
The comments for 'C Programming Language' without comments about links, apply here also.
It is unfortunate that the author uses a debugger that appears to have disappeared from the market.
With this problem at the start of the book, it could deter anyone to go further into the book.
I did find, at the start, that kdbg seemed to meet the debugging requirements.
However, after updating 'kdbg' I could no longer get a register readout. Using 'gdb' is very painful and slow.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good first step, 20 Sep 2012
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Excellent book, but way too much space has been wasted on things that could have been explained using half of the words. As a result, the author ran out of space to cover the FPU instructions, which I think is a must even for a beginning programmer, so I consider this book incomplete. Also, there are many errors, some not included in the errata. But it gives you sufficient knowledge to go on researching on your own using Intel documentation, for example. On a positive note, the language is easy to grasp even by so called "dummies". This book focuses on the Intel syntax, which I find helpful. Explanations are very detailed and there's plenty of examples. A lot of space has been devoted to setting up working environment and correct methodology, based on author's experience. Regrettably, the Insight debugger, that examples in this book use, is no longer maintained, so I had to use an old distro. What saved the 5th star is very in-depth coverage of memory addressing.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting and a perfect start to assembly programming., 7 Feb 2011
This is a grate book for anyone starting to learn assembly language. I am a computer science student and therefore have to do a lot of academic reading, This is by far the most informative and captive educational book I have read in a long time. There are bits in it that could have been left out, for example setting up a development environment but I have been using Linux and programming in C for years, so maybe its just me.

Well Recommended!!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fluff, 20 May 2013
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The prose style horrible. It is in the register of a Topgear presentation (which works for topgear, not for assembly code) rather than a clear, concise and clean academic style. It is far too long for far too little information.
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