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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BANDS JUST DON'T MAKE ALBUMS LIKE THIS ANY MORE...
Nowadays we all know that "Derek is Eric", but back in late 1970 this wasn't as obvious to many, and so the double-album into which Eric Clapton and his new band had invested so much emotion and effort, which he released pseudonymously under the name Derek and The Dominos, failed to achieve the level of commercial success it deserved; Clapton's wish to refrain from the...
Published on 21 Mar 2011 by Mr. L. F. G. Ballinger

versus
36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Buyers Beware
This item was bought as gift for my partner and received on release day (Monday 21st), it was sealed and looked to be an ideal gift for a long time Eric Clapton fan who already owns the Layla 20th Anniversary Edition. How disappointing then to open it and find that the box contained no badges, no cover art work print, only two facsimile tickets and torn cardboard slots...
Published on 26 Mar 2011 by KTBabe


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Layla and other assorted lovesongs: Derek and the Dominoes - Why does love got to be so sad?, 10 May 2012
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Eric Clapton has always recorded his best music in the face of adversity. In his John Mayall and especially n his Cream days it was the adversity of trying to make a mark amongst other talented musicians. In his early solo career it was the adversity of fighting his heroin addiction. Here, in the gap between the break up of Blind Faith and his first solo projects, it is the adversity of a painful love for another man's wife that drives him, mixed in, one feels, with the need to subsume himself into the relative anonymity of a band.

It is a record in which Clapton is really pushed. He has a wealth of emotion to pour out and commit to vinyl, he seems totally inspired. But he is also accompanied by another guitar god Duane Allman, and the resulting duel between the two is exhilarating. The record reaches it's apotheosis with the cathartic Layla at the end, where all of the elements combine to produce a perfect, draining and exhausting finale that has rightly gone down in music history.

It's 40 years on, and this deluxe edition is intended to mark that anniversary. Disc one contains a new remix and remastering of the original album, which sounds quite superior to my 1997 Polydor version. This disc is also available as a standalone without the second disc of extras.

The second disc is everything that a fan could wish for - unreleased tracks, live recordings of previously released material, all to a high audio quality and all interesting and relevant.

There is also a super deluxe edition, which goes way over the top to present absolutely everything a super fan could wish for. For a regular fan such as myself the normal deluxe edition is plenty. 4 stars.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Consummate blues, born out of the pain of unfulfilled love., 24 Aug 2006
By 
Themis-Athena (from somewhere between California and Germany) - See all my reviews
"Have you ever loved a woman, so much you're tremblin' in pain, and all the time you know she bears another man's name - but you just love that woman so much, it's a shame and a sin ... and all the time you know she belongs to your very best friend!" If you'd never heard this album's title track, you would swear that "Have You Ever Loved A Woman" was the song that Eric Clapton wrote for Pattie Boyd Harrison; not only do the lyrics of Billy Myles' blues classic fit so perfectly, Clapton positively pours his heart out as he sings them, and his guitar screams with the pain of unrequited love. And even before get to this song, Clapton's own "Bell Bottom Blues" lays bare similar feelings and recalls his infamous heroin ultimatum to Pattie ("Either you come with me or I'll take that"): "Do you wanna see me crawl across the floor to you? Do you wanna hear me beg you to take me back?" And as the man pleads with her, so does his guitar, and you wonder what woman could possibly have resisted such an impassioned plea.

Until of course, almost at the end of the album, you hear "Layla," this record's motto more than a simple title track and, in many respects, its reason for being. Torn by personal insecurity, Clapton used the cover and seeming anonymity of yet another band, and the parable of a medieval Persian love story ("Layla and Majnun" - reportedly, "majnun," in Persian, means madman) to put into music what he couldn't put into words alone. From its opening riff to its last note the song is pure blues, Clapton audibly on the brink of the madness he sings about, and his guitar wailing, moaning and crying out all that was in his heart: "Layla ... you got me on my knees - Layla ... I'm begging darling, please - Layla ... won't you ease my worry now?"

Sparks must have been flying in the studio while Eric Clapton and Duane Allman, recruited by manager Tom Dowd to add inspiration and take some of the lead guitar weight off Clapton's shoulders, drove each other to ever greater heights, simultaneously feeding off and to each other. Like most of the album, "Layla" was recorded live in the studio, and only a live recording could transmit this feverish outbreak of passion. Merely listening to the song is emotionally exhausting, and you can only imagine what must have gone on in the studio and inside Clapton during its recording. To hear the Allman Brothers' drummer Butch Trucks tell the story (in an interview for "Off the Record"), Duane Allman gave "Layla" its finishing touch when he added the five notes immediately following its signature riff. Yet, Allman is not credited as a writer (if that story is true, though, how much more than those five notes would it have taken I wonder?); only drummer Jim Gordon is, for having written the song's piano closing - which he had to be persuaded to allow to be used.

And while Eric Clapton continued to perform the song unaltered for years after its initial recording, he spontaneously decided to include it in the setlist of his MTV "Unplugged" appearance where, deprived of all its riffs, even its signature beginning toned down to a few simple notes, and Clapton's voice unexpectedly reflective, Layla assumed a different personality although not a word of the lyrics was altered. Yet, just as Eric Clapton's and Pattie Boyd's marriage was over by then, Layla was now less an object of burning desire than somebody the singer thought about - thought back to maybe, or sought a conversation with, possibly cautioning her about the consequences of her actions, or recalling his experiences with her: "What will you do when you get lonely, no one waiting by your side? You've been running, hiding much too long - you know it's just your foolish pride ..." And although Clapton has gone back to performing the song in its "plugged in" version during his 2001 "Reptile" tour, he has confined himself to talking only about its musical values, commenting on the technical difficulties of playing riffs and chords that are virtually opposite to what you are singing in an interview for the tour's official program.

Besides Eric Clapton and late addition Duane Allman, Derek And The Dominos consisted of the musicians "left over" by the breakup of Delaney and Bonnie, with whom Clapton had briefly found shelter after yet another supergroup of his (Blind Faith) had disintegrated way too quickly: Bobby Whitlock, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon. Like virtually all of Eric Clapton's albums, solo as well as with his various bands, this record combines material written by Clapton himself and covers of songs he liked; and of course, there is much more to it than "Layla," "Have You Ever Loved A Woman" and "Bell Bottom Blues." As always, Clapton makes his mark with every song alike, and as always, he needs and has found (or Tom Dowd found for him) a cast of outstanding musicians to work with. Segar/Bronzy's "Key to the Highway" becomes an extended blues jam session as there ever was one, and Jimmie Cox's "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out" forecasts the feelings which, among other things, later compelled Clapton to establish the Crossroads foundation.

Eric Clapton has said about Derek And The Dominos in the interview for the "Reptile" tour program: "[That] was a band I really liked - and it's almost like I wasn't in that band. It's just a band that I'm a fan of. Sometimes, my own music can be like that. When it's served its purpose to being good music, I don't associate myself with it any more. It's like someone else. It's easy to do those songs then." Hearing the raging pain of "Layla"'s original recording, you wonder whether this is maybe also the only way for him to perform it now ... at least "plugged in."
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Layla blues, 28 Mar 2011
By 
R. L. Milborrow (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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The packing was awful but the music brilliant.

Scratched cd's, bent tickets, crumpled sticker.

Poorly designed and the 3-d album artwork on the box lid was juvenile beyond belief.

I bet Eric hasn't see this.

Save your money - buy the deluxe edition for 11 - infinitely better.

So disappointing.

Ruan x
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure Class, 2 Oct 2003
By 
Steve (Watford, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Layla (Audio CD)
Clapton recorded this album under his 'Derek' pseudonym but to me is the best Clapton Album. It was a double LP and you get a lot of music.
The musicanship is outstanding from all involved with the slide guitar equalling Claptons own prowess.
There are some weaker tracks, but for me the best ones are truly awesome.
The very seventies titled 'bell bottom blues', 'Nobody knows you', the stonking 'key to the highway', The fantastic tribute to Hendrix's 'Little Wing', 'Layla' and the achingly beautiful 'Thorn Tree in the Garden' make this an album you will never tire of hearing.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars its going back, 30 Mar 2011
By 
Stephen Johnson "stevie boy" (united kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
just to say that i to have had to return my Deluxe copy of Derek and the Dominos.
Badly marked vinyl and 1 cd covered in glue.i'm gonna give it 1 more try as its a lovely item to own when totaly 100% perfect.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clapton at his best, 6 Mar 2004
This is an exceptional album. It is, in my opinion, Eric Clapton's best work since (and maybe even including)Cream. The guitar playing is, as you would expect from Clapton, excelent while not being over the top. Duane Allman and Clapton were obviously on the same wavelength when they were making this album, and their co-playing on 'Bell bottom blues' in particular is just superb.
This record combines rock, blues and folk really nicely, and more than being a brilliant 'rock' album, it's a just a great music album. It's an extremely enjoyable listen, and is just the right length. The album is capped by the unforgettable riff from 'Layla'.
If you are a Clapton fan and you don't have this, buy it NOW! If you are new to him, get this first rather than any of his solo material, because it's simply better.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning Guitar Rock, 15 Mar 2000
By A Customer
An album full of emotion, a classic of its genre. The great Eric Clapton is joined and complemented by the best slide guitarist the world has ever known - Duane Allman. Alas Duane was killed on his motorcycle shortly after this record was made. So listen to these classic tracks and if Duanes screaming slide playing does not send a shiver down your spine I'll be amazed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth it, 7 Jun 2013
By 
Miss S. P. Wells "Penrose" (reigate surrey) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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Still listening and getting to know the album as there is
so much in it.
I heard this when it was first released in 1970
and could not afford it, being only 14. I used to go and ask the record dept
in Grants in Croydon to play it for me and I would sit in the
booth for as long as possible without getting chucked out!
The LP vanished without trace and then one day in 1973 I was walking
down a beach in Wales and heard the strains of Layla coming out
of a transistor radio and couldn't believe my ears - radio 1
were playing Layla as a single. The rest is history.
Clapton's finest era was with the Dominoes.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eric, Duane & the guys, 31 May 2013
By 
GlynLuke (York UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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Hearing this again, after too long away from its many delights, I realise I`ve seldom heard such joyous blues-rock music. These five guys display such a feeling of multi-layered, interweaving blissed-out music-making on these tracks that you can`t help thinking there must have been something in the water back in 1970 in that Miami studio, or that Tom Dowd is a producer who just wanted to create a warm glow of sound in which their instruments - in particular the twin guitars of the Englishman and the American - could wail and whisper, shiver and shine, duck and dive and drown in bucketloads of exultant sonic electric gorgeousness!
Much of the time it`s not easy (or necessary) to tell which axeman is playing lead as they both had a `sweet` way of playing - the past tense sadly suitable for the late lamented Duane Allman - and both play heart-tearingly, nailbitingly exciting solos on the straight blues workouts, Have You Ever Loved a Woman, and especially the phenomenal ten-minute Key to the Highway, on which they seem to be each upping the ante, urging each other on to ever greater flights of vertiginous guitar audacity. You can sense their blood racing in their veins - along, no doubt with certain other substances...
I Looked Away is a terrific mid-tempo opener to this perfectly programmed set of songs (which - how could they have known? - fit neatly onto one disc) and is followed by one of my favourite tracks, the yearning Clapton-composed Bell Bottom Blues, a stunner of a song which Eric sings like a dream (to my mind, EC has always been an underrated singer).
Nobody Knows You...is a lovely, unaffected reading of the old blues standard, while
I Am Yours is a gentle love song co-written by EC.
Anyday is glorious! Written by Clapton & keyboardist and sturdy-voiced co-singer Bobby Whitlock, it`s one of the most representative songs on this iconic album, a fast-paced yet warm and joyful rocker.
Tell the Truth is just great, and Hendrix`s Little Wing a fine tribute to the recently dead legend.
It`s Too Late is an unexpected delight. I`ve got a version (the original?) by none other than Roy Orbison, but it suits the Dominoes down to the ground. They rock it up a bit, unsurprisingly.
Layla is - well, it`s Layla...
My mate Pete doesn`t much like Whitlock`s Thorn Tree in the Garden, but I think it`s a nicely gentle way to close an otherwise fairly frenetic record.
This is one of the greatest albums of its era, or any era. It sounds as timeless now as when I first heard it as a callow nineteen-year-old, and it still excites the hell out of me.

A tremendous, eternally joyous classic.

(NB. I`ve reviewed the remastered single-CD original album, not the 2-disc affair. Believe me, it`s a better bet, and it`s really all you need. Anything more is just gilding the lily!)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Layla and other assorted lovesongs: Derek and the Dominoes - Why does love got to be so sad?, 10 May 2012
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Eric Clapton has always recorded his best music in the face of adversity. In his John Mayall and especially n his Cream days it was the adversity of trying to make a mark amongst other talented musicians. In his early solo career it was the adversity of fighting his heroin addiction. Here, in the gap between the break up of Blind Faith and his first solo projects, it is the adversity of a painful love for another man's wife that drives him, mixed in, one feels, with the need to subsume himself into the relative anonymity of a band.

It is a record in which Clapton is really pushed. He has a wealth of emotion to pour out and commit to vinyl, he seems totally inspired. But he is also accompanied by another guitar god Duane Allman, and the resulting duel between the two is exhilarating. The record reaches it's apotheosis with the cathartic Layla at the end, where all of the elements combine to produce a perfect, draining and exhausting finale that has rightly gone down in music history.

This is the 1997 Polydor release, with an decent remastering and one bonus track in the form of `Thorn tree in the garden', a contemporary track in the same lovelorn vein as the rest of the album. The more recent 40th anniversary edition contains the same bonus, but a different remix and remaster, which is superior. 4 stars.
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