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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rothfuss hasn't lost his touch, despite some problems
To say that The Wise Man's Fear was one of the most anticipated books in the genre community this year is an understatement. The eagerness and amount of speculation on when the book would be done and would consequently released, reminded me of fans waiting for Rowling's Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix and GRRM-fans waiting for A Dance With Dragons (though less...
Published on 24 Jun 2011 by W.M.M. van der Salm-Pallada

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45 of 52 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Overrated
Minor spoilers due to inferences.

While I enjoyed Name of the Wind and The Wise Man's Fear I can't help but be concerned about the delivery of this second installment. Kvothe's time at the University mires the story in the same old ground. That aspect has a very Harry Potter feel which I don't believe justified its quantity in this installment. That ground was...
Published on 30 April 2011 by Jason


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kind of a letdown, 16 April 2012
This review is from: The Wise Man's Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle) (Kindle Edition)
I really wish Kvothe had remained a virgin.

I'm not a prude or anything, but I can't stand hearing about sex, page after page. It really does read like a fantasy after a while - not the type that thrills you or makes you turn the page, but the type a sweaty fourteen year old would appreciate.

The first book was amazing, but every so often I would have to fight against the thought that Kvothe was a Mary Sue character for an SCA buff. The second book I just couldn't overcome that thought, as I was having breasts pressed to my face metaphorically through print. After reading for the thousandth time about some minx's lithe figure, I was close to closing the book and having done with it.

Worst offenders:

1. About fifty bajillion bits of sex to do with what's her name, fairy type sexpot.

2. Quasi-zen garden fanatics who don't believe that men are part of the process of making babies! So they have wild sex with the main character! How absolutely stupid must this culture be, when prehistoric man figured that one out! Argh!

3. Hearing sort of tangentially about his many conquests, and how the women he sleeps with don't think he'll stay with them, which is why he doesn't have any girlfriends. Maybe, just maybe, it's because he's kind of a whore.

Why did I finish it? Purely from the promise of the first book.

I may give the next one a look but if it's the same as this one I'm not going to bother. What a disappointment.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Second Installment in Three Parts of an Immeasurably Engaging Trilogy, 5 Jan 2012
By 
Fantasy Lore - See all my reviews
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It seems that for many of the dissatisfied readers of `A Wise Man's Fear' there were obstacles that they felt it necessary to overcome, which marred their ultimate enjoyment of this novel. The one mentioned most of all by reviewers being the lack of even a brief chapter detailing the events that occurred in the previous novel (`The Name of The Wind'), or indeed any expositional text whatsoever. I'd agree that the omission on the author's part to aid readers by familiarising them with the material will likely prove slightly detrimental to most people's grasp on the facts of the story- excluding those who may, like the story's protagonist, be endowed with unfailing recall. But the author makes the point on his blog that every detail he provides on each page is crucial and therefore any attempt to summarise the events would prove futile and misleading. Instead he recommends re-reading `The Name of the Wind' in order to familiarise yourself with the characters, settings and various intricately-woven plot threads. This, I would say (even though it's advice I couldn't follow in my haste to read the next installment of Kvothe's journey)...is fair enough.

Another criticism relates to the central character's sexual awakening (under the tutelage of not one, but four beautiful women). Admittedly, while engagingly erotic, these sexual encounters are over-long and the titillation factor wears thin after a while. But once again I would refer dissatisfied customers to the author's own words when describing Kvothe's opinion of the opposite sex..."Some might take offence at this way of seeing things...But those people do not understand love, or music, or me." So for those who may find Kvothe's sexual antics and opinions distasteful, which I was beginning to myself, this can be taken as a reminder that this is Kvothe's story, not the reader's, or anybody else's. Some bitterness spices the pudding after all.

Finally, the length of the novel itself (at 994 pages) appears to be a drawback for many. It is certainly long and perhaps it would be fair to say that yes, it's actually ridiculously long (especially considering the minute type face), but I, for one, found the novel absolutely mesmerising from start to finish and nigh on impossible to put down. Were it not for the biological imperatives of nourishment and warmth I doubt I would have. Why on Earth would anyone want less of such an awesome thing?

In summary, non of these obstacles, in my opinion, are justification for rewarding this book anything less than five stars. It is thoroughly compelling, populated with memorable and sympathetic characters, is clearly an incredibly well-researched tale and is basically a tour-de-force on the author's part. In fact, the quality of the novel brought to my mind one of my favourite fantasy stories of all time- `Magician' by Raymond E. Feist (especially in relation to Kvothe's combat training) and in fact I would have to say that `A Wise Man's Fear' surpasses even that great masterwork of fantasy. To say it was worth the agonizing wait would be an understatement.

My only true criticism of the novel (if I had to make one) would be the interludes in the novel that take place in the novel's present-day setting in which Kvothe/Kote, Bast and Chronicler talk and cavort at the Waystone Inn. I usually resent these interludes for interrupting the story of Kvothe's early years, which I find far more engaging. To me Chronicler is a woefully uninteresting, I don't understand the Bast character and I find Kote banal in their company. But I know I'm in the minority with this, as so many readers find these scenes utterly fascinating.

Placing all competitors firmly in the shade (including `The Name of the Wind'), `A Wise Man's Fear' is the best fantasy work of this decade to date.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More than just a page-turner, 31 Dec 2013
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I just finished reading The Wise Man's Fear straight on the heels of finishing The Name of the Wind. After consuming two huge books like this I would normally be hungry for a complete change but Patrick Rothfuss is such a compelling writer that I would happily wade straight into the third book if only it existed! (Apparently due out August 2015)

You will love these books if you like fantasy but if that isn't your bag and you are reading these reviews to see why these books rate so highly please just give The Name of the Wind a try. There are so many layers to these books, they truly are more than imaginative fairy tales and they aren't just another series in competition with Martin, Tolkein et al. Rothfuss manages to weave ideas into the storyline which make you think on so many different levels and which challenge you to question our own world. Yes, the story is engaging and really well written and the characters are believable too but the writing is also far more intelligent than most other books in this genre. These books are simply a great read for loads of reasons. I can't wait for the next one and I hope that Patrick Rothfuss's imagination is already working towards another series after this one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars five stars, just amazing, 18 Nov 2013
By 
chris (coylton, ayrshire) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Wise Man's Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle) (Kindle Edition)
this book is just simply great, full of mystery and intrigue. the best kind of novel that holds your attention from the first word to the last. can't wait for the next release. such a shame that there isn't more from this author.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome!, 17 Nov 2013
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This review is from: The Wise Man's Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle) (Kindle Edition)
This is a great story told excellently. I absolutely love this book and it was just as excellent as the first in this series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As good as the first book!, 11 Nov 2013
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This review is from: The Wise Man's Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle) (Kindle Edition)
As good as the first book! Could not stop reading this book, now- very long wait for the next one!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, 10 Nov 2013
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This review is from: The Wise Man's Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle) (Kindle Edition)
Even better than the first book, complex , fast and utterly entertaining. If I could give it six stars, I would.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantasy made like real. Brilliant, 8 Nov 2013
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I enjoyed this book thoroughly because of Rothfuss ability to explain how to do magic for us unmagical persons in the real world. It's like he is explaining how to play an instrument - it's possible to learn it, if you just practise and try alot you will (after a long while) succeed if your mind is focused enough.

And his knowledge of the english language ensures it to be a great experience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'The Wise Man's Fear' by Patrick Rothfuss, 27 Oct 2013
By 
L M Hughes (Manchester, England) - See all my reviews
'The Wise Man's Fear' is the second instalment of The Kingkiller Chronicles, a fantasy trilogy centred on the `autobiographical' tale of the protagonist, Kvothe. It picks up where 'The Name of the Wind' left off, continuing Kvothe's tale without much preamble, and cleverly reminds us of key events and important information as it goes along, rather than simply dumping it all at the start.

The format of the story follows the same pattern as the previous novel: Kvothe narrates the chronological events of his younger years, and the tale is occasionally interrupted by interludes focusing on the present day. Kvothe is one of the Edema Ruh, renowned travelling performers and famed for their storytelling skills; however, the narrative is somewhat stale and rambling when compared with the previous novel, perhaps because it covers a much shorter period of his life and strings it out over a thousand pages. Roughly half the novel is an account of Kvothe's continued shenanigans at the university: most of these are highly amusing, though others seemed tediously similar to those in the previous book.

It's clear that the author is playing with the concept of the unreliable narrator, and Kvothe is doubly unreliable: he's narrating his story for an audience, and it is also being set down for posterity. As such it becomes something of a fun game for the reader to question some of his assertions: for example, he claims to have learned an entire language in a day in order to successfully be acquitted at a public trial; however, he deliberately skips over this part of his story, refusing to supply details of the trial because his readers will find it boring. He later proceeds to give a long and detailed account of his time in the Fae with Felurian, during which he spends several dull chapters doing a whole lot of nothing. Kvothe's egotistic determination to focus on the parts that he finds most interesting is no doubt a deliberate part of the author's message about the misleading nature of stories, and the dangers of becoming a legend in your own lifetime; unfortunately, this also makes the novel significantly less compelling than its predecessor.

'The Wise Man's Fear' isn't without its strong points, though. One of Rothfuss' biggest strengths is the ease with which he creates characters that are not only likeable, but also complex and memorable. 'The Name of the Wind' was almost solely focused on Kvothe; it was introspective and very much self-indulgent. In 'The Wise Man's Fear', there is still plenty of this trademark self-indulgence to be found (Kvothe's ego is not something to be easily pushed aside) but there is also a much wider awareness of the world and its inhabitants. The reader is given a distinct impression of each character no matter how infrequently that character appears in the story. We have Kilvin, the gruff yet somehow fatherly Master Artificer; Tempi, the quiet but deadly Adem mercenary; Denna, the flirtatious yet insecure con-artist-turned-musician; Bast, Kvothe's loveable apprentice with a dark secret; Auri, the frail and flighty girl who lives beneath the university; and lots more. Kvothe's mentor, the enigmatic Master Elodin, has a relatively small amount of page space devoted to him, yet he is undoubtedly many readers' favourite character, myself included. He is one of the nine Masters of the university and is more powerful in the magic of naming than most men alive; he is mischievous, brilliant, and ever-so-slightly insane; he walks on roofs, engages in petty crimes against other Masters who have offended him, and encourages his students to stand naked in thunderstorms.

My point is, it's characters such as Elodin that make this story dance off the page, and I think this, along with the beautifully poetic narrative voice, is definitely one of the stronger aspects of 'The Wise Man's Fear'. Though some of the setting and events feel a little stale, and despite the fact that the plot is occasionally lacking, well, plot, 'The Wise Man's Fear' is an entertaining and passionate novel, and I would recommend it to those who thoroughly enjoyed 'The Name of the Wind'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Patrick Rothfuss is my favourite author, 16 Oct 2013
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I loved the second book as much as I loved the first. And now I'm waiting for the third to come out in paperback. His writing is so beautiful that he makes the fantasy completely believable. He is my most highly recommended author.
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