Customer Reviews


123 Reviews
5 star:
 (51)
4 star:
 (30)
3 star:
 (16)
2 star:
 (15)
1 star:
 (11)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth a revisit
When I first listened to this album, I found it a bit unfathomable as the band obviously revisited the direction they took for Kid A. I listened to it a few times, didn't really buy it and left it alone for a couple of years.
I revisited it recently and found myself getting it and actually rather liking it. Unlike Kid A, there is a coherence about what is here,...
Published 2 months ago by Chris Mannion

versus
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Or maybe The King Of Limp....
It's hard to imagine how this paradoxical album will be viewed in five years or so. It manages to be simultaneously surprising yet predictable, up yet down, and percussive yet restrained. And perhaps that is the biggest challenge of all; for all it's multi-layered drum patterns, shakers, bells etc. it never actually 'kicks in'. The mix doesn't help matters either; vocals...
Published on 15 July 2011 by Blahtzenberg


‹ Previous | 1 2 313 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A few words ..., 14 Mar 2012
By 
Kenneth (nottingham, england) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
For a long time now i've considered Radiohead a classic band, a band whose consistancy, experimentation and influence in rock music is probably unparrelled by any of their contemporaries. I don't think i'm alone in thinking this and i would also wager the band themselves are aware of the high esteem in whcih they are regarded by fans and critics alike. Bearing that in mind it might suggest there's been a weight of expectation hanging around the bands neck probably post Ok Computer, that maybe they got a little weary of carrying as they stepped into the studio to make their eighth album in their 20 plus year career. If i'm correct, it may account for why King Of Limbs feels less toiled over and maybe a little threadbare in comparison to previous efforts. The band don't seem to be trying to deliver any grandiose statements this time around, they seem to have placed more emphasis on the enjoyment of making the music, having fun in the studio, opposed to meticulously slaving away in an attempt to craft another masterwork. Being a long time fan of the band i for one am happy for them, even if the music isn't quite as earth shatteringly great as a result of this new approach.

There are still pleny of reasons to give this a listen though, as the band are so seasoned at what they do even when they're not pushing themselves to the absolute limit they can produce evocative and distinctive music anyway. Take opener Bloom with it's repeated piano loop, sonorous horn arrangement and electronic effects, it all coalesces into an intoxicating wall of sound to provide a great opener. Or the brilliant single Lotus flower which features animated bass lines with Thom's serpentine falsetto married to minimal percussion producing a mesmerizing experience. There's beauty to be found too with the dazzling piano ballad Codex, laced with shimmering strings and another impressive vocal perfomance by Yorke, the song almost feels like a modern day paean. It bears more than a passing resembelance to Amnesiacs Pyrimaid Song but that only slightly takes away from it's allure.

Little By Little and morning mr magpie both feature intricate guitar playing and looped percussion, giving them a weightless feel that'll tickle you're pleasure centres but fail to really stimulate them. The vocal harmonies on Give Up The Ghost feel genuinely heart warming and the guitars have an effortless tranquility to them. The final song Seperator has the band sounding liberated with Yorke singing "Finally i'm free of all the weight i've been carrying" accompanied by a neil young inspired guitar riff. The band have removed the shackles of expectation by releasing this album, It's engaging, quirky and maybe a little slight at just over 37 minutes, It won't cause a seismic shift in the way rock music is made like Kid A did and it's unlikely to be regarded as the greatest album of the decade in 2020 either. But that shouldn't stop these talented musicians from releasing future gems like this, especially if their digging the process of making music now, more than ever before. If King Of Limbs is anything to go by, these guys will still be worth following in the future they just won't be leading the pack anymore thats all.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A record to frustrate expectations, and just generally frustrate, 16 Oct 2011
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
With their 2007 album In Rainbows, Radiohead showed they can still make beautiful, largely unpretentious rock music. It was melodic, romantic and a lot of fun. Never a band to rest on their laurels, they return with The King Of Limbs, wherein unpretentious rock music takes a holiday.

This shouldn't come as a surprise. The band has often responded to success by veering off in a different direction, most notably with the guitar-eschewing Kid A. The King Of Limbs sets out its stall on this immediately: Bloom features piano loops, echoes of electric keyboard, a ponderous bass-line, off-kilter drumming and no vocals for the first minute. It all comes together in inimitable Radiohead fashion, and it's impressive and strangely beautiful, but the message is clear: no more simple melodies. This is music to be returned to, considered, then reconsidered. (Well, most of it. The album's reputation as odd and difficult is almost entirely defined by its first half.)

Some of these songs focus more on presentation than melody. Certainly Little By Little, which is all about the percussion, and Feral, a twitchy electronic piece that recalls weird synthy collages like Paperbag Writer. This is prickly, not instantly loveable music, and it's difficult to imagine the band behind the pretty In Rainbows producing it. That is the point, of course: eight albums in, Radiohead must fight to remain relevant and interesting, and this can only be achieved with as much change as possible. Their next album will probably sound nothing like this.

Ardent fans will recognise Good Morning Mr Magpie, a jaunty oldie dating back to the early 2000s, and the previously acoustic ballad Lotus Flower. Both are totally re-imagined: Magpie has a latter-day Radiohead sneer and cynicism, its guitar-picking infectiously playful against choruses gloomy and ghostly, and drums clattering like machines. Lotus Flower is dance music Radiohead-style, and is clearly a product of the band enjoying themselves. Just listen to Thom's sassy delivery of 'So now I've set you free' - pure confidence drips from it. Expectations are torpedoed throughout this short album, and in particular I doubt anyone expected Radiohead to produce something like Lotus Flower. Although oddly arranged, with samples and strange noises galore, these songs are great fun.

After the tricky first half, the final three tracks seem much more conventional. Piano ballad Codex was the only thing about Limbs that I initially enjoyed. A dreamy, beautiful piece like so many of the band's other piano gems, Codex's melody is acutely affecting, but it's not quite that simple: the piano sounds as if it's melting and bubbling, and brass is gently applied along with backwards birdsong for one of the album's emotional highs. Give Up The Ghost is arguably even better, its light falsetto vocals optimistic and gently pretty, and its crescendo enormously relaxed. All this is quite a turnaround from where Limbs begins. For eight songs, it's certainly got range.

Ghost might have made a more impressive closer than Separator, which must rank among Radiohead's most unassuming songs. It seems an odd choice for the (generally prestigious) spot at the end. But The King Of Limbs is out to frustrate expectations, and the apparent carefree attitude adopted here is not what you'd expect: gone is the emotional catharsis of Videotape or Motion Picture Soundtrack, replaced by something slight and oddly charming, like one of the lesser cuts from The Bends. Along with Codex, it's one of the least unusual songs here. This helps to remove the stigma of importance surrounding Radiohead's work, which is arguably part of the reason for Limbs: as if to say, this is just where we're at, it's no big deal. The King Of Limbs was meant to seem spontaneous; to some, unfortunately, it seems contemptably slipshod.

It can be hard work adjusting to the band's latest glacial shift. Personally, I felt Limbs tried a little too hard at wrong-footing its listeners, something that might cause others hooked by In Rainbows to give up entirely. Feral in particular seems so obscure it borders on parody; fans of Bodysnatchers may find themselves unpleasantly bewildered. I still think Little By Little, Feral and Separator are less-than-impressive songs rendered interesting by the overall production. In general, after the sublime In Rainbows, it can seem irritating to once again have to concentrate on Radiohead's music in order to enjoy it. Fortunately, this is Radiohead, and even their more prickly tracks are fascinating enough to draw you back.

Limbs marks another important stage of Radiohead's career. It rewards your patience eventually and is, apparently, quite carefree music by the band's standards, recorded in about five weeks. Still, the initial frustration did have me hoping their next effort wouldn't take so much getting used to, or four years to arrive (and frankly, next time I'm hoping for more than eight songs, which isn't very much however you cut it). With the continued buzz, numerous new songs and a tour in the works, I might be in luck. But then, I really should learn that one cannot predict Radiohead with any accuracy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Supercollider is the best track NOT ON THE ALBUM, 24 April 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
There are three half-good tracks: Lotus Flower, Codex, and Morning Mr Magpie...Supercollider would have made it four and strengthened the album IMMENSELY, it's a really nice track vying for the top spot from this recording endeavour. Had Supercollider been included on the CD the album would have been worth buying, but it's not, so it's not - which is very frustrating. I'm a long-term Radiohead fan (from their first album), and a HiFi enthusiast with a CD player worth twice what my car is (that's just how important enjoyment of music is for me)... so I look forward to buying the superior quality CD to hear the band's creations at their sonic best. So why can't we have a CD with Supercollider included (this track is only available as an mp3 download apparently...or a £75 vinyl import). They should have put Supercollider on the CD, AND included it on 7DIgital's FLAC download album (great idea here by the way guys - a studio made FLAC album of better-than-CD quality, which I hope other bands copy!) As it stands I've reluctantly decided I'm not going to buy the CD, and hope that my patience results in a later release CD or collectors edition CD or something, with a decent quality version of Supercollider included, not a strangled and compressed mp3 version) - even better if they also realease it on FLAC as well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars best thing: the cover artwork, 19 April 2011
By 
D. Q. RAMOS (Sintra, Portugal) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
I'm not a "Kid A" or "Amnesiac" hater like some reviewers here obviously are... to me those 2 albums mark one of the most powerful Radiohead periods in their career. A mark they never quite achieved again after Amnesiac.

King of Thieves was unbalanced and predictable in many aspects while "In Rainbows" was a great comeback of the band with great moments of genious here and there.

The band evolved from a "rock/indie with a twist" to exploring feelings, colors, sounds and even smells... music made abstract and getting shape in each owns feelings and emotions, that's the beauty of Radiohead, from "The Bends" to "Amnesiac" they are one of my top 10 choices for the greatest bands of all times.

The King of Limbs is a very strange album, difficult to get into (and that's not bad, on the contrary)... the problem is, when you start getting into it, you come out with the feeling it could be so much better (and even bigger).

My review track by track:

Bloom:

The opening track, setting the mood for the album.... i like to think of this as an intro, no genius here, some interesting voice/sound combos from middle to end.

Morning Mr Magpie:

One of the weakest songs in the album, interesting breath effects and rhythm, but gets tiring early with its weak lyrics and repetitive sounds

Little By Little:

Interesting rythm, again endless repetition.... nothing that stands out either in the lyrics or music variation.

Feral:

Another "intro" track imo... just like in Amnesiac first track, but a mere shadow in creativity, nothing gained, nothing lost.

Lotus Flower:

The "pearl" of the album, the beginning is simply genius and the one that defines the cover-artwork. The clap variations are priceless, the haunting sounds... underwater/extraterrestrial feeling... pure Radiohead here.

From this track forward the album starts gaining body and grabs my attention.

Codex:

Another pearl... hair rising track... together with "Lotus" this are the best moments on the album. Tom's voice always worked with the piano... and this melancholic piece of genius is simply marvelous. If you can tame your emotions and exorcise your moments of pain with sad songs... this is one of those you wont forget easily.

Give Up The Ghost:

I love this song... the way the haunting voice gives space to the subtle guitar chords.. and hangs in there while Tom's voice leads the way to another burnt sunset feeling... desolate... sad... and yet so attractively beautiful.

Separator:

A premature ending imo... nothing new here, most pop track on the album... cutting the tempo of the previous ones and leaving you with that sense of... lacking something.

All in all, if you loved "Kid A" or "Amnesiac" the second half of the album is worth a listen. If you only see "The Bends" or "Ok Computer" in front of you... you will hate this.

Since i like all the four albums (their golden age), its hard for me to see a band so important in my life giving us so little in terms of creativity and even size.

I think listeners deserved more, Radiohead deserves more.... 1 more year in production wouldn't have hurt, with a more elaborate first part and more tracks into it.

As it stands, its kind of a "Amnesiac" leftovers album, with 2-3 outstanding tracks and the rest just... bland... nothing standing out in remembrance (except for those 3 "pearls").

You can do better.... so much better than this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars widely underrated, 1 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
I am somewhat puzzled by several people’s reactions to this album. Perhaps these stem from the fact that it is not as instantly appealing as 'In Rainbows', but that to me is part of its charm (and just goes to show that you shouldn’t judge an album on just a couple of listenings). To my mind it is only after repeatedly listening to it that the magic of TKOL becomes apparent. I think this comes from the multi-layered arrangements, and especially from the deceptively simple drum patterns. (In a Mojo interview after In Rainbows was released, Phil Selway commented that with the band’s turn to electronica and use of programming after OK Computer he feared he was becoming redundant. It is thus ironic that, with a partial return to electronica, one of the highlights of this album is Selway’s drumming.) From the minimalist piano intro to ‘Bloom’ to the gorgeous and multilayered ‘Give Up the Ghost’, this is by my standards simply a superb album; in ‘Codex’ it contains an exceptional piano-based ballad as good as earlier Radiohead examples of this genre (e.g. ‘Pyramid Song’, ‘Sail to the Moon’), and others tracks as good as anything in their back catalogue. All I can say is, if you’ve been put off by other people moaning that it’s not as good as In Rainbows (or for that matter people who haven’t ‘got’ Radiohead since The Bends or OK Computer), ignore them and give it a go. If you already own it and don’t play it, get it out again and listen more carefully.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Radio head at a great price, 1 Mar 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
Excellent and quick. Thank you. Prompt delivery. Always been a fan of radio head and was delighted with the price
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars challenging, 16 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
Radiohead always challenge the listener and this album is no different. Simlilar in style to Kid A, it's a great late night record. A little short, but the selection and order of songs works really well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Pure brilliance, 16 Jan 2013
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
It was a xmas present for my daughter who went to see Radiohead last October in Manchester and said they were brilliant, couldn't get this album at HMV so went straight onto to Amazon and it was delivered to my door quickly then wrapped up for santa coming....Lush....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars So very clever, 23 July 2014
By 
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
Such an under rated album.

I did not 'get' or appreciate this album for a long time and then when you do its so clever.

The Basement DVD that you can buy separately somehow makes this album more understandable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Album of 2 Halves - 4.5 Stars, 17 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
The King of Limbs certainly feels like a fresh start for Radiohead.

The title of this review refers to 2 Halves, and I say so because the first 4 tracks sound experimental and at times somewhat repetitive, as though the band are trying to work their way into new musical surroundings. However, from Lotus Flower through to Codex, Give Up The Ghost and finally Separator, the quality reaches new heights. Haunting, emotional and beautiful.

Radiohead have a knack of being able to blend guitar music with electronica and other variables and produce quality music and the aforementioned 2nd half of the album is a prime example of this. If the next album is along the lines of the 2nd half of The King of Limbs, it'll be outstanding.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 313 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The King of Limbs
The King of Limbs by Radiohead (Audio CD - 2011)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews