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70 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful in every way possible
It is difficult to write a book for any age group which manages to be funny, serious, interesting, gripping and realistic without losing some form of consistency or structure. But John Green, in his third novel, truly raises the bar. His characters are rich but they never shy from saying things startlingly real and believable. Q, for example, is the perfect teenager...
Published on 30 July 2009 by giantlawnmower

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I'm sure the book is great but to say that Amazon are advertising it in ...
I'm sure the book is great but to say that Amazon are advertising it in the Children's books for 9-11 year olds is shocking! I bought this as a reward for some children in my class (year 5 class) for winning a reading challenge. The content is very inappropriate for children with swearing and sexual content throughout. I had to ring parents and get them to return the...
Published 1 month ago by James Heeley


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70 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful in every way possible, 30 July 2009
This review is from: Paper Towns (Hardcover)
It is difficult to write a book for any age group which manages to be funny, serious, interesting, gripping and realistic without losing some form of consistency or structure. But John Green, in his third novel, truly raises the bar. His characters are rich but they never shy from saying things startlingly real and believable. Q, for example, is the perfect teenager without every falling into cliche - he's a bit of a nerd but he's strong and commanding. Margo may be the 'oddball' but, even without personally being in the narrative for most of the book, proves to have depth that backs up her status. The plot is gripping, without driving the characters in any way that does not make perfect sense. The first part, for all it's random requests of Margo for Q gives us something stunningly romantic and original as a way to meet and understand the characters. I can not type higher praise for this book - personally, I think it is one of the books which has stayed with me the most since I first read it, full as it is of images I am sure I will never shake in my lifetime.

I would recommend anyone, young or old, to read this book. What it will give you is an experience that not only will you enjoy but that maybe you might get something out of. I live in the UK, and I had to buy this book on Amazon because it is not published here; apparently, the UK are not receptive to YA novels of this nature. All I can say is, it's a shocking indictment on us, and not the book.
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63 of 67 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Paper Towns, 16 July 2010
By 
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
To be totally honest, when I received this book for review I wasn't all that sure about it. Having never read any of John Green's previous work, I don't really know why this was other than I hated the cover. However I'm glad I was sent this one, as it turned out to be the most beautifully written story and I adored every minute.

Quentin (Q) has been infatuated with his next-door neighbour, Margo, since they were both 9 years old and were involved in a traumatic experience. But to Q, Margo is completely unobtainable; she's magical, courageous, wild and unique where as he's a bit of a geek, self conscious and timid. I wasn't expecting to like and relate to Q as much as I did, not being a teenage male myself. But I'm sure we've all known someone like Margo, who we see as so perfect but completely out of our league, and idolise so much they become almost godlike in our imaginations. He also has all the qualities required so that anyone, of any age can identify with him, with flaws as human as they come. He's a bit dorky, easily embarrassed, obsessive and impatient. He's also sensitive, thoughtful and loyal. Above all though, he's just a really nice kid and someone you would want to be friends with.

The other characters in the book are equally well rounded. Q's friends, Radar and Ben each have their own quirks, which make them completely believable. The dynamics and dialogue between the three miss-fit boys is superb, ranging from hysterically funny, cringe-worthy, contemplative and touching. I really liked seeing such close friendship from a male perspective, something I have rarely come across. Although Margo is the main focus of the book, for the majority she is missing and in solving the mystery of her disappearance, and indeed who she actually is, Q embarks on a surprising journey of self-discovery. Margo herself is exactly what Q imagines her to be to begin. On their one night together she's fun, crazy, vivid, passionate and wild but through Q's investigation, as a reader you are taken on the same journey as he, realizing that the way you see and imagine people is rarely who they really are.

Paper Towns is quite simply a wonderful and beautiful Book. It starts with fun filled energy and continues with intrigue and mystery that will keep you turning the pages. I really wanted to know what had happened to Margo, more than I remember wanting to know the ending of a book for a long time. I couldn't predict any of the plot and it was constantly surprising and fresh. John Green's writing ranges from truly funny one-liners to thoughtful and poignant with a cast of characters you will genuinely truly care about; even days after finishing I'm still thinking about them. Highly recommended.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A hilarious adventure!, 2 Sept. 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
Let me start by saying that my fellow passengers on my bus home today must all think I'm completely nuts
after this book had me laughing out loud! I thoroughly enjoyed every second of this book and so glad this was
bought me as a gift!

The story is from the point of view of Q otherwise known as "Quentin" and his relationship with a very mysterious
girl named Margo Roth Spieglemann. A girl who Q has known most of his life. He describes Margo as being his miracle,
because of all the places in all of Florida Margo moved in next door to him. He's always been in awe of Margo
thinking her a complete mystery, someone exciting and surprising, and unattainable. As they grow up they drift apart
and Q goes to admiring her form afar. However, even though Q and his friends are on the botoom end of the pecking
order at school, his one time friendship with Margo has kept them protected from the bullies.

The story starts mere weeks before graduation and Margo turning up with a painted black face at his window very
late at night, determined to get him to be her wheel man whilst she carries out her epic plan for the people
in her life who she feels have wronged her. Mostly because of his secret affection for her he evntually agrees to
go along with her schemes and ultimately has the most amazing night of his life. The next day Margo has vanished.

Everyone tells him that she's just after attention and will turn up but Q is left very worried and determined to
track her down. He finds what appear to be clues in her bedroom and with the help of his two hilarious friends
Ben and Radar he begins a quest to figure out the clues and ultimately bring Margo back to Orlando.

We follow Q through his investigations, his desperate searches and constant wonderings, trying to figure out
who the real Margo was hoping that might lead him to her. Its very funny and also sad and heartwarming.
He cares for her so much, but he doesn't really know her and only figures it out once he really sees Margo
for who she really is and not who he wants her to be.

John Green has a unique way of writing. Its incredibly descriptive in that I could easily picture the world he
was creating and all the things and crazy antics that happened in the book. His characters were spot on and he
writes humour very effectively. I don't know if I've ever read anything funnier that when one character
confesses that he can't take his girlfriend home because his parents own one of the worlds largest collections
of black santas! John Green could easily become on of my fav authors. 've already ordered "Looking for Alaska"
I can't recommend this highly enough. If you want a story with heart, epic road trips and adventures and a bit
of meat to it, then you won't be disappointed by this!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars John Green is a genius, 27 Jun. 2012
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
Paper Towns by John Green is a novel about the infamous Margo Roth Spiegelman, an enigma in her hometown, and neighbour to protagonist Quentin Jacobson, also known as Q.

After a shared traumatic event as children (the finding of a dead body), Margo and Quentin grow apart as friends, But Q has never gotten over the ever intriguing Margo. One night many years later, Margo appears at Q's window- a night of revenge, adventure and major mischief ensues, giving Q hope for a renewed friendship-or maybe more. However things don't go as planned for Q, and after their night together Margo disappears, though not for the first time. As more time passes and no-one has heard anything from Margo, Q starts to wonder if she will ever come back.

The many faces and eccentricities of Margo Roth Spiegelman are explored throughout the book as Q learns more and more about the girl he thought he knew. With some help from Walt Whitman and clues left by the elusive lady herself, Q sets out to follow the trail of breadcrumbs; hoping they're not just a dead end. Quentin's slightly obsessive (though well intentioned) feelings for Margo make him an endearing lead throughout the story while Margo is a complex and multi-faceted character who is almost revered by her friends and admirers-though as Q comes to learn, she is just a girl.

Paper Towns is one of the most refreshing and interesting narratives out there. Green has taken a fairly simple premise (boy likes girl etc.) and woven a seamless piece of literary excellence. Quentin's honest and insightful narrative, along with laughs aplenty courtesy of best-friends, Ben and Radar, makes for a smooth, and at times hilarious, journey. He has a talent for making a complex plot seem flawlessly simple and this effortlessly genius novel is a fantastic read. I would recommend Paper Towns for anybody who wants a truly engaging, thought-provoking tale of the power (and danger) of human perceptions.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious-ly charming, 22 Jun. 2011
By 
S. Shamma "Suad" (Abu Dhabi, UAE) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
I started reading Paper Towns yesterday, and finished it just a couple of hours ago, and that was only because work got in the way! Otherwise, I would literally not have put it down.

It was hilarious, it was engaging, it was endearing, it was clever, it was sarcastic and it was very very witty. All things that I love, making it a perfect, well-rounded book.

John Green can clearly tap into a teenager's psyche like no other. His ability to convey a teenager's thoughts, humour, struggle and emotions were incredible. And I fell in love with each and every character in the book who were also very well-rounded. Quentin's circle of friends were some of the most charming and captivating characters, I could almost feel them jumping out of the book and coming to life, they were THAT real.

Quentin is a timid, and dorky teenager, but he is also loyal, devoted, considerate and sincerely sweet, and he's had a crush on his next-door neighbour for as long as he can remember. Only he always thought he was completely invisible to her...until she climbs through his bedroom window dressed like a ninja asking him to accompany her on a life-changing journey.

Margo's a spontaneous, wild, independent and carefree girl who was always known for breaking the rules and norms - all things that appealed to Quentin. So when she disappeared, no one was bothered about it, including her parents, who were used to (and fed up with) her random disappearances and antics. Only there was more to Margo than meets the eye, and Quentin was about to find out all about it. But it doesn't stop there, because Margo was also about to discover that there is more to Quentin than meets the eye, surprising both him and herself (and his entire circle of friends.)

Q's best friends, Radar and Ben, are absolutely amazing, and very very memorable characters that will stay with you even after you've finished reading the book. Each one of them had their own little quirks and whims and eccentricities that made them stand out in their own way - even Lacey. The dialogue between all three of them is hysterical and witty, it makes you literally laugh out loud. (I had to muffle my own laughter several times at the office!) But Green was also able to take serious situations and convey them through those boys in a remarkable fashion. There were moments when the dialogue would turn poignant, broody, and contemplative, and the message behind the journey was one of a serious note as well.

"People are rarely the way you imagine them to be."

Simply put, Paper Towns is an incredible page-turner that will keep you wanting more. And I do want more.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I'm sure the book is great but to say that Amazon are advertising it in ..., 4 May 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
I'm sure the book is great but to say that Amazon are advertising it in the Children's books for 9-11 year olds is shocking! I bought this as a reward for some children in my class (year 5 class) for winning a reading challenge. The content is very inappropriate for children with swearing and sexual content throughout. I had to ring parents and get them to return the books before the children read them. If you're trusting Amazon's recommendations for books for children then be very careful because is definitely not one for them!
That being said, the book could be fantastic, just be careful!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "The way I figure it, everyone gets a miracle.", 12 Mar. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
I can see this book serving a purpose for a variety of audiences. It is an easy read and in my opinion should not be examined much too critically. Personally, I had a good couple of hours break from my life and remembered what it was like to be graduating from high school. Friendships, relationships, the importance of prom and of course the one odd classmate who hardly anybody knew but imagined a trail of awesomeness following them wherever they went. This book is about impossible teenagers. The ones that have insane ideas, make insane plans and follow them through. The ones that still believe that the world is their setting and they can play a role, any lead role of their choosing. It made me wonder if they actually exist anywhere in the world and if the fact that an impossible teenager residing in every one of us is what makes this kind of book work.

High school pupils will find this book relevant and will reflect on the topic of "change" - the leaving.

Parents of teens will gain a refreshed understanding of what goes on in their strangers' mind.

Older people will either find this book incredibly boring or incredibly cute and smile not only at the characters, but at some wonderful messages that John Green leaves for us throughout the book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Well written, 14 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
Was a good read but was quite long and slow moving for what it was. I felt it needed a stronger plot to sustain interest and look at the characters in more depth. Still a well written and enjoyable book though :)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Utterly brilliant in every way!, 18 Sept. 2011
This review is from: Paper Towns (Hardcover)
John Green is just one of those authors you'll remember. All of his books are written so well, they'll have you laughing out loud and thinking really deeply about yourself. Its so nice to find something that get the balance right! I would definitely recommend this book to everyone its just THAT good. The story line is amazing and the way its told. BRAVO JOHN!
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read, 12 Oct. 2011
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
This is another great book from the author of the excellent Looking for Alaska.
Quentin Jacobsen has always loved his neighbour Margo Roth Speigelman. They aren't really friends by the time they reach their final year of high school so he is surprised and excited the night she knocks on his window and takes him on a late night prank spree. Then Margo disappears on one of her trips, her parents say they won't let her come back home this time, and Quentin finds himself investigating the hidden life of Margo Roth Speigelman.

This is a great book by turns funny, insightful, intriguing and poignant. It includes poetry by Walt Whitman, crass humour, a sense of dread, and an exploration of how we relate to people. It's nice to see a book in which a girl who is the object of the main character's affection is shown to be both more and less than he expects her to be. Quentin realises that he put Margo on a pedestal and discovers that not only did he fail to understand her, but so did everyone who knew her. Everyone has their own version of Margo, and none of them can explain her. The book played with my expectations at every step and I honestly wasn't sure how it would end.
This is a great book and I would recommend John Green's books to any teens (or indeed adults) who want an interesting, entertaining and also meaningful read.
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Paper Towns
Paper Towns by John Green
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