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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Lion's Tale. The impossible follow up.
If your considering buying this book, you have probably read it's prequel already. And if you have, you probably understand why this might be the most hotly anticipated wrestling book in modern memory. Expectations for Undisputed were high.

I have only read it once (so far) but it does not disappoint. Jericho has proved himself as an established writer, who...
Published on 17 Feb. 2011 by Jimmy

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Great for Fozzy fans....
Firstly I will acknowledge that this book has a VERY difficult job in living up to the excellence that A Lion's Tale (Jericho's first book) gave us. That book is up there, in my eyes, with Mick Foley's first and Bret Hart's as showing just how great a wrestling book can be.

Even so, judged on it's own merits, Undisputed cannot be said to be in the upper...
Published on 9 July 2011 by IWFIcon


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Lion's Tale. The impossible follow up., 17 Feb. 2011
If your considering buying this book, you have probably read it's prequel already. And if you have, you probably understand why this might be the most hotly anticipated wrestling book in modern memory. Expectations for Undisputed were high.

I have only read it once (so far) but it does not disappoint. Jericho has proved himself as an established writer, who knows his fanbase. The same in-jokes return from A Lion's Tale, as well as a whole bunch of new ones. Remember the Jericho curse? It's back, with a vengeance.

Undisputed also spends a lot more time looking at some of Chris' non-wrestling work, especially Fozzy. Fans of the band will definitely enjoy it, but so will people that are interested in the music business in general. It's an eye opener for anyone that didn't previously think record companies were slightly evil. But it's also testament to Chris' hard work and determination to make the band succeed.

The book also covers Chris Benoit, with more humanity than any account I have read before. It was well known tht Benoit & Jericho were close friends, and for once it doesn't seem like someone is trying to cash in on the dark event for personal gain. With both Benoit and Eddy I was in tears reading, it was incredibly moving.

In comparison, does it live up to all the hype? Maybe. After one highly enjoyable read, its a little hard to tell. A Lion's Tale is one of my all time favourite books period, I have read it at least 20 times. I think Undisputed is a brilliant book in its own right, and strongly recommend it to all wrestling and non-wrestling fans.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars i'm the king of the world, 2 Dec. 2011
I'm a long time wrestling fan and proud of it. I've been watching wrestling and reading the books longer than I care to remember, so it is with great honour that I call this one of THE greatest wrestler books of recent time.

In fairness, both the lion's tale and undisputed are great books on their own but for them to both come from Chris is amazing. I think this more than the lion's tale interested me as a reader due to the fact that I was never really a fan of the wcw, main reason being I didn't have the channel it was on. So this book's wrestling stories are mainly wwf stuff which took me on a bit of an emotional journey. I loved how honest he was, didn't dumb it down and spoke his mind. This not being true of some other superstar's books due to ghost writers but I think he wrote this all himself but don't quote me on that. Other books have always been from the wrestler's point of view but written by someone else and most of the time you can tell too but this sounded all Jericho.

Not only does he talk about his wrestling but also about his band fozzy and some TV / movie work he has been involved in too. Be this as it may I couldn't help but feel that his career was mediocre at best. This is not my personal opinion but more so, his. He talks about matches and quickly states that it was not his best match or feud and when talking about gigs he would say that the crowds were never there but he would always do his best for the fans that were, but mostly you got the impression that he loves his life. Believe me he has reason not too and he doesn't hold back on that either.

In total Chris tells it as he sees it. He talks about friends he's lost to the business and the small but frequent references along with a chapter on Benoit may change your mind on the negative things you heard. He loves his mum and I'm glad that he got closure on that.

I wasn't a huge Jericho fan but after seeing his "save us" run and also reading both books am proud to say that I am a firm jerichoholic and hope that rumours of a return are not greatly fabricated.

Not since mick Foley have I enjoyed a wrestler's story so much. Good going Chris, well done :O)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Other autobiographies are ass clowns, 13 Sept. 2011
Wow, I thought the first book was good but this legacy just keeps getting better and he is working on a third, the sexy beast. Unlike many others before him he has followed suit with Foley and Edge and written himself an awesome story and insight into Chris Irvine rather than just his wrestling character. Jericho is both funny and frank as well as humble and easy to relate to with how he has written the book. It is an indepth account of his life both in the ring and on the stage "Fozzy" and a fair bit of the inbetween stuff that very few ever talk about. If you liked the first book then this is a no brainer buy this book now. If you are new then you must read the first book "around the world in spandex" because this is the second part of Jericho's life (where he joined the WWE from WCW). I just cannot wait for the third instalment!!! In short this second coming of his autobiographies is awesome and makes all other pretenders to the throne look like ass clowns. Buy this book you will not be disappointed.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still A Great Read But Hampered By Poor Writing, 17 Feb. 2011
By 
RM Gallon (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
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If you've read the first autobiography by Chris Irvine aka "Chris Jericho"; "A Lion's Tale: Around The World In Spandex", you'd understand what made his book a more entertaining read than many of the other wrestling books. It was goofy, self-deprecating, and done in total character to how Chris Jericho, the wrestling legend the world has gotten to know, acts. What also made it unique was that, done when he was not wrestling anymore and so he had a lot of time on his hands, it chronicalled his life and his aspiration to become a WWF (not addressed as WWE in the book) superstar, and the amazing journey he went on chasing that dream in great detail, word-checked and as completely accurate as he could be. Ending just as he left the Gorilla position to finally become an actual WWF performer on television, it left the rest of his journey that the majority of people reading the book would already know and as a result not essentially needed to be written about, and has since gone on to be classed as one of the definitive wrestling autobiographies of all time.

After the first book was a an unsurprising success, the follow-up; "Undisputed: How To Become The World Champion In 1,372 Easy Steps" continues the more identifiable period of Jericho's wrestling career in the WWF/E. Still fully of his witty anecdotes and Jerichoisms (The Embarrassed Author's Note, anyone?), "Undisputed" certainly feels like a Jericho book and is easily comparable to "A Lion's Tale".

So why only four stars?

Simply put, "Undisputed" feels rushed. Whereas with "A Lion's Tale", Jericho took his time to detail his life story and provide a slow but page-turning timeline, referring to companies how they were at the time as he was unsigned to a particular company at the time; "Undisputed" feels like Jericho had Vince McMahon breathing down his neck, scrutinising every word of every sentence of every paragraph of every page of every chapter of the book. Throughout the book the company is referred to as WWE, no big thing, but to read the books one after another causes a slight shock to the system. Another big problem is large chunks of the story are missing. At one point Jericho talks about his debut at WrestleMania, and after a chapter about the journey of Fozzy, he is talking about his next WrestleMania...sort of...

The opening sentence to Chapter 10: Vince Loves Apes reads "WrestleMania X8 was looming and it was decided that I would work with my old friend from WCW, William Regal". Except Jericho's match with Regal was X-Seven, a year earlier. No biggie, except WrestleMania X8 was the most important match of Jericho's career, the main event against Triple H for the WWE Undisputed Championship, the first and only WrestleMania Main Event match Jericho would have until 8 years later at WrestleMania XXVI.

The book feels like it was not read through once, double-checked to make sure there were no typos, no misinformation, no, dare I say it, mistakes.

Sure, there is the same witty charm, the same behind-the-scenes exclusives, such as how Vince McMahon was as a boss, the elitist lockeroom, and how Jericho's first year in the company, despite who normal viewers thought everything was fine; was gearing up to be his last.

Overall, still a good book, but somehow only just in the same league as its predecessor, and really no way near as good.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Revealing Insight Into One Of The WWE's Most Underrated Stars, 5 April 2012
By 
A. J. Potter (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Vengeance 2001. A four way tournament to unify the WWF and WCW Heavyweight titles for the first time in history including Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, Kurt Angle and Chris Jericho. No one gave Jericho a chance in hell before the event, logically expecting that either Austin or The Rock would walk out of the San Diego Sports Arena as wrestling's first undisputed champion given their leadership of the Attitude Era. Yet amazingly it was Chris Jericho who won that evening. Yet he wouldn't have another title reign in the WWE for six years. This is the story of how that evening came about and what happened after.

Unlike many autobiographies it's clear from the beginning that this book and it's predecessor A Lion's Tale was written by the man himself. Jericho is a fascinating narrator mixing pop culture and metal references with an self efacing and humorous style. He gives a deep insight into famous Attitude Era figures such as HHH (who frequently attempts to bury Jericho and is largely responsible for the end of Jericho's undisputed reign however always works brilliant matches with Chris), The Rock (one of Jericho's true industry friends and a great worker) and Vince McMahon who comes across as eccentric as ever and as someone that doesn't seem to know what to do with Jericho at times. Despite Jericho's largely complimentry words for Vince, McMahon's seemingly inability to know what to do with Jericho or have total faith in him is one of the main themes of the book and leaves the reader feeling that Jericho's WWE career could have been so much more, especially after the departures of Stone Cold and The Rock in the early 00s. Jericho also provides an interesting insight into the cultural differences between WCW and WWF/E and how he initially struggled to adapt to these. It's often forgotten how different the two promotions were despite their intense rivalry.

For someone like me who has long since stopped watching wrestling the book was a total nostalgia trip and definitely up there with Mick Foley's 'Have A Nice Day' in the wrestling canon. However as mentioned in other reviews Jericho pads out part of the book with stories about his band Fozzy, which while integral to his life story isn't as intriguing as his wrestling stories. However it's interesting to read Jericho having similar thoughts to Trent Reznor (Nine Inch Nails) on the insanity of contracts in the music business.

Ultimately despite the Fozzy interludes Jericho's book is a fascinating and personal account of wrestling's boom period from someone who despite his talent always seemed to be on the edge looking inward and is well worth a read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Chris Jericho the trillogy????, 20 Aug. 2011
By 
There are many parallels between Chris Jericho and Mick Foley. Their friendly rivalry is the funniest thing about the book. I think this book suffered the same thing Foley's second book did. They used up all their best jokes. The other thing is both of them wrote their books whilst they were actively wrestling for the WWE so they is a limit to the inside information they can pass on. The final thread they both have in common is in both books they are both trying things apart from wrestling. Jericho, being a Rock star on the side then trying his hand at acting. I have to compliment Jericho on his attitude. When is left the WWE he was under no illusions that suddenly Hollywood would welcome him with open arms, he was willing to start right from the bottom, the same way he did in wrestling. I liked the book more as it went along it was good but I don't think it was great. The thing that I think did not add up for me was that Chris Irvin has matured and is writing from that perspective, Chris Jericho is stuck in a bubble using the same jokes he always has. My three favourite things about this book was the locker room fight between Chris and Goldberg, how Chris dealt with the NWO coming to the WWE, and his handling of the Beniot issue. Chris does not hide from the fact that he and Beniot were and would still be friends their whole career, rather than trying the pretend that Beniot did not exist he talk openly about his feeling for Beniot. Chris very cleverly starts and finishes this book the way he started and finished a Lion's tale, preparing to return to the WWE, and the return to the WWE respectively, leaving room for a third book. The Lion's Tale was about paying his dues and getting to the WWE, This book is about his transition to the WWE. Could there be a third?
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3.0 out of 5 stars Great for Fozzy fans...., 9 July 2011
By 
IWFIcon - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Firstly I will acknowledge that this book has a VERY difficult job in living up to the excellence that A Lion's Tale (Jericho's first book) gave us. That book is up there, in my eyes, with Mick Foley's first and Bret Hart's as showing just how great a wrestling book can be.

Even so, judged on it's own merits, Undisputed cannot be said to be in the upper echelon of wrestling books. It's better than a lot of the tripe that has been fed us over the years (I'm talking about things like Hulk Hogan's books - which should be stocked in the fiction secetion) and will offer up some enteratinment and genuine insight to people who loved his first book.

Jericho doesn't pull any punches with some of his "backstage" problems in the WW(F)E and is more candid than I thought he would be about failures in the "real world" as well.

There are a number of problems for me though.

Firstly, the title of this book makes it perfectly clear where Jericho's appeal lies...as a wrestler. Yet this doesn't stop Jericho padding out great sections of the books with tales of his "rock star super stardom" in Fozzy. Before too long I was skipping chapters of this that dealt with Fozzy recordings, concerts and tours. Now, this might well just be me. It might just be that I have no interest in a rock band that doesn't appear to have had any "mainstream" success and owes it's continued existance to the fact that Jericho made a name for himself in the wrestling world. And that's fair enough; other's might love these bits of the books. I don't and furthermore the over-aggrandising nature of the sections quickly made me lose interest.

Secondly, whilst there are some amazingly candid stories about the WWE and Vince McMahon (some of which will make your jaw drop) there is at other times a pervading sense of WWE spin involved. Let's just say that Jericho seems fairly keen on a number of occasions to explain away Vince McMahon's illogical out-bursts as being anyone else's fault but Vince's (and admittedly, Jericho also candidly seems willing to blame himself as much as possible for these at times as well).

Those who enjoyed a Lion's Tale will want to read this follow up and they will find enjoyment. To me though, the book was disappointing in it's own right and even more so compared to the first one.
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5.0 out of 5 stars JERICHO'S BRILLIANT FOLLOW UP TO "A LIONS TALE", 9 Jun. 2011
Undisputed: How to Become World Champion in 1,372 Easy Steps is Wrestler/musician/actor and author Chris Jericho's follow up to his superb "A Lions Tale" which was published in 2007 and covered Jericho's early life right up to as he was about to debut for WWE in 1999. Undisputed picks right up where the last book finished as he makes his debut live on Monday Night Raw interrupting The Rock as his countdown clock strikes zero!!

Early in the book Jericho describes the hard time he had early on in his WWE career. How hard it was adapting to WWE's style of wrestling. What life on the road was like compared to WCW. Chris writing is much the same as "A Lions Tale" and will have you laughing! This is far from a wrestling book as Jericho covers his time in his band Fozzy and how playing to seven people isn't much fun and whilst he was a global superstar with WWE that counted for little with Fozzy, he recalls stories of meeting Sharon Osbourne, Dave Mustaine(Megadeth) and Iron Maiden. The book also continues the story of his mother and her death in 2005 and how he dealt with it. Eddie Guerrero's death is also dealt with as well as the controversy surrounding Chris Benoit, and what Jericho made of the whole tragic happenings. The book is full of great photography from Jericho's time in WWE and on the road with Fozzy. The section on when Jericho leaves WWE in 2005 is interesting as he basically enters another world and he details his many failed auditions for movie parts.

Undisputed: How to Become World Champion in 1,372 Easy Steps which means how many matches it took him to become the first Undisputed Champion is just as good as "A Lions Tale", a real page turner. Even at over 400 pages long it won't take long to finish. The chapters are kept brief so it's easy to dip in and out of. Not being a WWE book probably helps that Jericho could write what he wanted without being censored. It finishes just as he's made his comeback to the WWE in 2007 so no doubt we can expect a third book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome read, 23 April 2011
Yes, I am a huge fan of Chris Jericho but that aside I thought this was an awesome read and for the first time in a very long time I actually read a book from cover to cover. I found this book hard to put down as Jericho is a great storyteller and he gives you a rare view of life behind the scenes in the WWE. This book continues where A Lions Tale left off and covers Jericho's WWE Career up until he took a break in 2005. It was interesting to read how unpopular Jericho was when he first entered the WWE and about the often volatile and uneasy relationship he had with Vince McMahon. It took him a long time to find his "groove" so to speak and the only real friend he had in the WWE for a longtime was The Rock!. He also talks about his family, Fozzy and his time away from the WWE between 2005-2007. He also talks emotionally and remembers fondly his close friend Eddie Guerrero who sadly passed away in 2005,. He recalls the last time he saw Eddie and his wife Vickie, by chance. One of the most interesting parts to the book was his own personal views and thoughts on one of his best friends Chris Benoit.He talks about Benoit as a close friend and a family man who loved his children more than anything which makes what he did still hard for Jericho (and many others) hard to comprehend.Jericho gives a human touch to the whole tragedy.

The book ends at his debut back in the WWE in November 2007 (I was there for that one!!). All in all a great read, Jericho tells a great story and keeps things interesting sharing his often humorous views and thoughts on his life thus far. Can't wait for the next installment!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A book that you will "Never, Ever" want to put down, 1 Aug. 2011
By 
Chris Jericho was the reason I became interested in professional wrestling at the turn of the century.

Every time his entrance music hit I would sing along breaking the walls down and along with many other Jerichoholics, could not wait to read this book.

Picking up from A Lion's Tale, Chris dives deep into the heart of the wrestling world, telling interesting and frequently funny tales of backstage rumours and bad politics.
All questions spawning the incidents over the years are covered. His feud with Goldberg, his feelings towards Eddie and Chris Benoit's deaths, his family life, Fozzy, his time spent in prison and of course his rise to becoming the first ever undisputed champion.

The book opens with an introduction by Mick Foley and then one by Zak Ryder, both very funny actually and then Chris takes control by telling tales of how he wasn't getting any respect, how he doubted his performances and the uncomfortable professional relationships he was developing. All detailed and with his own blend of cultural humour Chris doesn't take any prisoners and this has topped HBK's book to become my favourite wrestling biography.

Certainly a worthy read for any Y2J fan but simply a must if you love the sport.
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