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on 27 February 2011
As a book series progresses you'll ideally get to know the main characters a little better; hopefully watch them grow and learn. During "No Good Deed," Mark was mostly on his own. His powers were secret from most and not totally believed by the few who were aware. In "March into Hell," Mark gets a needed support team (whether he realizes he needs it or even wants it). However, he struggles with his inclination to do what he believes is right while being uncomfortable with the attention he receives. Mark starts to give serious thought as to who or what is behind the power he's been given. In the process, he grows as a person and becomes better equipped to deal with his situation.

In "No Good Deed" Taylor was under almost constant stress, both physical and emotional. Without giving spoilers, I can't say how, but think you'll find his experiences in "March into Hell" are almost as intense. McDonald does very well putting you inside Mark's head in a way that jacks up the intensity. Luckily for you she doesn't make you actually feel it.

The only quality those who read "No Good Deed" won't find in this latest installment of Mark Taylor's adventures is the political angle. (For first timer's Mark was imprisoned as a post-9/11 "enemy combatant" in that book.) Because of this, the good guys and bad guys are much easier to determine. The real life questions provoked by the politics of Mark's situation aren't there. Instead, for those who want more than just a good thriller, McDonald gives you plenty of opportunity to consider questions of heroism and hero worship. What makes a hero? Does being a hero commit a person to additional obligations? Is it reasonable to consider a hero a public figure with the loss of privacy that implies?

**Originally written for "Books and Pals" book blog.**
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on 2 February 2011
It wasn't that long ago that I read Book One in the series, No Good Deed, which I had really enjoyed. Therefore I was pleased I didn't have to wait too long for the next installment. As a brief precis Mark Taylor is a photographer who owns a camera, purchased in Afghanistan, which provides him with pictures of tragedies, followed by detailed dreams that mean if he intervenes in time he can stop them happening.

In this book we find Mark has been able to start over after the life changing events of book one, he has a new home, business and business partner, but things aren't going well with girlfriend Jessie. He is still using the camera to save lives and unfortunately for him becomes the centre of media attention when a journalist notices a pattern to various Good Samaritan acts being carried out. One particular save brings him within the sights of a cult leader who wants his power. The book is pretty action-packed, working it's way to a dramatic end but one that (I'm hoping) leaves scope for further Mark Taylor books

Mark is a great character, with plenty of positive characteristics but also enough flaws and self-doubt to make him believable. I liked the developing relationship with Jim, his tormentor in the first book. While this book is quite dark and with some graphic descriptions of how the cult treats it's victims this was offset by the relationships between the two men, Jessie and Mark's business partner Lily.

Book two spends a little more time contemplating the nature of the powers the camera has and where the powers come from. Mark finds himself thinking he is being tested by God but it is never made implicit whether the camera is some sort of divine apparatus or whether there is another explanation. This was one of the aspects I found really interesting in the first book so this reflection pleased me but I'm also happy that the reader isn't given a definite answer as to the source of the powers.

I found the first book more thought provoking, probably because of the coverage of the treatment of enemy-combatants in a post 9/11 world but this is a worthy sequel and I'll be waiting for news of further installments in due course!
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on 3 November 2011
This is book 2 of the Mark Taylor Series following on from No Good Deed (Book One of the Mark Taylor Series: A Psychological Thriller) where we first meet Mark, a photographer with an unusual camera which shows him images of future events

Having been to hell and back in the first book, Mark is now trying to find his place in the world again whilst still preventing the potential tragedies his camera & dreams show him.

This book is quite different, there is a heavy religious undertone (which doesnt bother me at all) in places, although not something that is thrust at you and some scenes are gut wrenchingly savage with some gruesome acts but it never reaches the nasty titillation or torture treatment some authors would stoop too.

Overall, its a proper page turner, you start to like Mark a lot more, and the returning characters of Jim & Jessie are well developed
The ending is FAR too abrupt and I am convinced there should have been another chapter, but I did THOROUGHLY enjoy it, and wouldnt hesitate to recommend this or the first instalment to anyone
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on 28 February 2012
This is book 2 of the Mark Taylor Series following on from No Good Deed (No Good Deed: Book One of the Mark Taylor Series (A Psychological Thriller)) where we first meet Mark, a photographer with an unusual camera which shows him images of future events

Having been to hell and back in the first book, Mark is now trying to find his place in the world again whilst still preventing the potential tragedies his camera & dreams show him.

This book is quite different, there is a heavy religious undertone (which doesnt bother me at all) in places, although not something that is thrust at you and some scenes are gut wrenchingly savage with some gruesome acts but it never reaches the nasty titillation or torture treatment some authors would stoop too.

Overall, its a proper page turner, you start to like Mark a lot more, and the returning characters of Jim & Jessie are well developed
The ending is FAR too abrupt and I am convinced there should have been another chapter, but I did THOROUGHLY enjoy it, and wouldnt hesitate to recommend this or the first instalment to anyone
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on 11 March 2011
After reading book one "No Good Deed" I was looking forward to this book and overall it didn't disappoint.

While Mark is still running his fingers thorugh his hair at every available opportunity it certainly didn't start to grate on the nerves as it did in book one possibly because a deeper character development makes up for it. I am glad Jim stuck around for the sequel and I'd like to read more about the adventures these two have.

I must confess at about the 86% point I thought the story telling started to lack focus and I was getting a bit bored but I stuck with it and before I knew it the book had ended. I am hoping there will be another book in the series but I'm not sure I like the idea of it being a foursome with Jessie and Lily tagging along so much, Lily is nice but limp lettuce-ish and Jessie is, well, Jessie!
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on 12 April 2011
I enjoyed this second Mark Taylor book as much as the first, though I would have liked more of an ending - hopefully the reason is because there is another on it's way?? the story comes from the same origin as the first (being the magic camera) but the angle is totally different and we learn more about the way Mark is perceived and how other people cope with such happenings and the religious rather political perception.

Again I admit this is not my usual choice of book as the story is so extraordinary but I was totally hooked and it was great to see the usual characters back and learn more about each of them.

thanks and i look forward to the next!
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on 31 December 2012
As far as sequels goes this is very good. I enjoyed catching-up with the story and the exciting lead-up to an even more complicated life for the hero. I think there were some missed opportunities in this though and hope the next episode doesn't become as predictable at it seems from the titbit provided at the end of this book.
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on 31 August 2015
This read was far different from the first novel - Mark had to deal with far more issues, mentally and physically. Anguish he suffered was palpable, and again, I read it in one night! Will now read third book, and I eagerly wait to see what happens next! Thank you from an old buddy who loves a good, and exciting read.
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on 28 June 2015
Absolutely brilliant and I'm already halfway through the 3rd book already.
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on 20 August 2015
Intriguing series - great story. Keep them coming M.P. McDonald. I love them.

Great series and well written - I can't put them down.

Great that Amazon are putting the book number sequence in the title - been a pain on other books like Jack Reacher to work out what to buy next.
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