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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good..but falls short of previous giddy heights.
Before I began reading James Lee Burke, I believed the two best Crime writers were Raymond Chandler and Ross MacDonald. Burke's writing possesses the finest aspects of both these exceptional novelists. He writes with the elegant, flowing prose of Raymond Chandler and marries to this the dark, complex plots that were Ross MacDonald's trademark. In my opinion he is the...
Published on 5 Dec 1999

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Sunset Limited" a one-track book
Photojournalist Megan Flynn and her brother Cisco return to New Iberia after many years as part of a film crew. Their father, union activist Jack Flynn, had been crucified when they were children. Some folks in New Iberia know who did it, others had a part in it. Now a new series of violent murders are occurring and the key to solving them is the old crucifixion. Parrish...
Published on 25 Mar 2003 by Patrick Burnett


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good..but falls short of previous giddy heights., 5 Dec 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Sunset Limited (Paperback)
Before I began reading James Lee Burke, I believed the two best Crime writers were Raymond Chandler and Ross MacDonald. Burke's writing possesses the finest aspects of both these exceptional novelists. He writes with the elegant, flowing prose of Raymond Chandler and marries to this the dark, complex plots that were Ross MacDonald's trademark. In my opinion he is the finest Crime writer of all, and really, one of the finest writers of the 20th Century.
In "Sunset Limited" however, JLB comes somewhat unstuck. At times I felt I was reading other Robicheaux novels, and the plot, whilst complex as usual never fully gelled. At the end I was left vaguely unsatisfied: a feeling I han't before experienced with this writer. "Sunset Limited" is still a very good read, but it falls short of the other Robicheaux novels, and 1997's marvellous "Cimarron Rose", which introduced a new character, lawyer and ex-Texas Ranger Billy Bob Holland. He could - and maybe should - replace Robicheaux as the author's primary creation.
My recommendation - buy "The James Lee Burke Collection" if you haven't read this author before - they are three of the better novels of this century ("To The Bright And Shining Sun" is my personal favourite) - if you have, buy "Sunset Limited" - but don't expect the same brilliance.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A One-Track Book, 2 Oct 2003
By 
Patrick Burnett "penngos" (San Francisco, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sunset Limited (Paperback)
Photojournalist Megan Flynn and her brother Cisco return to New Iberia after many years as part of a film crew. Their father, union activist Jack Flynn, had been crucified when they were children. Some folks in New Iberia know who did it, others had a part in it. Now a new series of violent murders are occurring and the key to solving them is the old crucifixion. Parrish Detective Dave Robicheaux becomes involved to right old wrongs, catch the bad guys and put a hurtin' on the mob, wrapping it up just in time to make it to his AA meeting and eat a bowl of cush-cush with Bootsie and Alafair.
Sound familiar? Yeah. Me, too.
Burke has been accused in the past of lifting descriptive passages whole and transplanting them to later books. Just lately he seems to be swiping his own plots and transplanting them to current books, but it isn't working anymore. Ideas that seemed bold and fresh earlier in the series are here worn and anemic. Why are all the criminals tied to the mob? Why are all the old Creole gentility tied to the mob? Why are all the film crews tied to the mob? I just don't buy it anymore.
I think Burke must still have some anger with Hollywood over "Heaven's Prisoners".
Burke's poetic writing is strong as always and his nostalgic evocation of the past makes for beautiful, melancholic reading. But he seems to have forgotten who Dave Robicheaux is and what Dave's doing in the middle of ! all this craziness. I have been frustrated over the last few books by Dave's brooding silence and refusal to discuss things with his wife, Bootsie. Instead, he alienates her and makes her feel bad with his inability to express himself. This is the woman who saved his life, for Heaven's sake! You'd think something like that would bring them closer.
Dave's daughter Alafair has also been pushed to the wayside. The interaction between these two characters used to be sparkling moments; Dave's love and pride in her was his weakness. in "Sunset Limited", Dave speaks to Alafair twice, both times to tell her to leave so he can carry on a conversation with someone else.
I like Burke. I like "Sunset Limited", but I miss Dave Robicheaux; I think much of my disappointment in this book is having spent eleven years with the character and watching him become a shell of his former self.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fear and Loathing on the Bayeaux, 14 Dec 2000
This review is from: Sunset Limited (Paperback)
There is no doubt that Dave Robicheaux is the hardest detective in fiction. He's nails. Just as well, given the unhealthy enviroment he operates within, where demented Argentinian dwarfs with a penchant for chewing off certain parts of your anatomy drink coffee in the Café du Monde, New Orleans. His partner, Clete Purcel, is even harder. You wouldn't want to spill his pint (Dave is off the wagon). Together they solve some of the bloodiest American crime fiction written, but this is no schlock horror. Stylish, literate, almost moral, with plots that grip like the aforementioned dwarf, there are now ten Dave Robicheaux novels. Buy it now, and get the other nine while you're at it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Louisiana with JLB, 8 July 2012
By 
R. C. E. Guy "Robin Guy" (Mickleton , Glos , UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Sunset Limited (Dave Robicheaux Book 10) (Kindle Edition)
Sunset Limited

This a long rambling story in the true JLB format with the two heroes, Clete and Jack fighting crime, booze and misfortune. It is well written and keeps up the interest with sharp turns and sudden surprises to give a long enjoyable read. Like all JLB novels the outcome is not always predictable. Not the very best but up there near the top.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Sunset Limited" a one-track book, 25 Mar 2003
By 
Patrick Burnett "penngos" (San Francisco, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sunset Limited (Paperback)
Photojournalist Megan Flynn and her brother Cisco return to New Iberia after many years as part of a film crew. Their father, union activist Jack Flynn, had been crucified when they were children. Some folks in New Iberia know who did it, others had a part in it. Now a new series of violent murders are occurring and the key to solving them is the old crucifixion. Parrish Detective Dave Robicheaux becomes involved to right old wrongs, catch the bad guys and put a hurtin' on the mob, wrapping it up just in time to make it to his AA meeting and eat a bowl of cush-cush with Bootsie and Alafair.
Sound familiar? Yeah. Me, too.
Burke has been accused in the past of lifting descriptive passages whole and transplanting them to later books. Just lately he seems to be swiping his own plots and transplanting them to current books, but it isn't working anymore. Ideas that seemed bold and fresh earlier in the series are here worn and anemic. Why are all the criminals tied to the mob? Why are all the old Creole gentility tied to the mob? Why are all the film crews tied to the mob? I just don't buy it anymore.
I think Burke must still have some anger with Hollywood over "Heaven's Prisoners".
Burke's poetic writing is strong as always and his nostalgic evocation of the past makes for beautiful, melancholic reading. But he seems to have forgotten who Dave Robicheaux is and what Dave's doing in the middle of ! all this craziness. I have been frustrated over the last few books by Dave's brooding silence and refusal to discuss things with his wife, Bootsie. Instead, he alienates her and makes her feel bad with his inability to express himself. This is the woman who saved his life, for Heaven's sake! You'd think something like that would bring them closer.
Dave's daughter Alafair has also been pushed to the wayside. The interaction between these two characters used to be sparkling moments; Dave's love and pride in her was his weakness. in "Sunset Limited", Dave speaks to Alafair twice, both times to tell her to leave so he can carry on a conversation with someone else.
I like Burke. I like "Sunset Limited", but I miss Dave Robicheaux; I think much of my disappointment in this book is having spent eleven years with the character and watching him become a shell of his former self.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sunset limited, 24 July 2013
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This review is from: Sunset Limited (Dave Robicheaux Book 10) (Kindle Edition)
This is another of James Lee Burke 's masterpieces .Always on point. It's almost like I'm reading poetry sat times. I can't wait to read his latest novel. I'll let you know what I think when I have finished it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good Reading, 17 Jan 2013
By 
John Newman (King's Lynn, Norfolk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Sunset Limited (Paperback)
I had forgotten how good this writer is at weaving a story. Completely satisfied with my purchase and will continue to look for more books by him.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 14 Nov 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Sunset Limited (Audio Cassette)
This is an excellent thriller. The book keeps you intrigued right up to the end. It manages to juggle several mysteries at once, which all intertwine. The book is set in the "deep south" of america. Some years ago a union man was killed by the KKK, a case the main character Detective Robicheaux has not forgotten. Do the current events surrounding the family of a big landowner have any connection to the past. Who or what happened to the daughter of that owner?
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4.0 out of 5 stars Robicheaux revisited one time too many?, 9 Jan 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Sunset Limited (Hardcover)
Before I began reading James Lee Burke, I believed the two best Crime writers were Raymond Chandler and Ross MacDonald. Burke's writing possesses the finest aspects of both these exceptional novelists. He writes with the elegant, flowing prose of Raymond Chandler and marries to this the dark, complex plots that were Ross MacDonald's trademark. In my opinion he is the finest Crime writer of all, and really, one of the finest writers of the 20th Century.
In "Sunset Limited" however, JLB comes somewhat unstuck. At times I felt I was reading other Robicheaux novels, and the plot, whilst complex as usual never fully gelled. At the end I was left vaguely unsatisfied: a feeling I han't before experienced with this writer. "Sunset Limited" is still a very good read, but it falls short of the other Robicheaux novels, and 1997's marvellous "Cimarron Rose", which introduced a new character, lawyer and ex-Texas Ranger Billy Bob Holland. He could - and maybe should - replace Robicheaux as the author's primary creation.
My recommendation - buy "The James Lee Burke Collection" if you haven't read this author before - they are three of the better novels of this century ("To The Bright And Shining Sun" is my personal favourite)- if you have, buy "Sunset Limited" - but don't expect perfection.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fear and Loathing on the Bayeaux, 13 Dec 2000
This review is from: Sunset Limited (Paperback)
There is no doubt that Dave Robicheaux is the hardest detective in fiction. He's nails. Just as well, given the unhealthy enviroment he operates within, where demented Argentinian dwarfs with a penchant for chewing off certain parts of your anatomy drink coffee in the Café du Monde, New Orleans. His partner, Clete Purcel, is even harder. You wouldn't want to spill his pint (Dave is off the wagon). Together they solve some of the bloodiest American crime fiction written, but this is no schlock horror. Stylish, literate, almost moral, with plots that grip like the aforementioned dwarf, there are now ten Dave Robicheaux novels. Buy it now, and get the other nine while you're at it.
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