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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bridgerton sibling story: Eloise (mainly during April, 1824)
Instead of Lady Whistledown quotes, each chapter is headed by an extract from one of Eloise Bridgerton's letters: to her mother protesting childhood punishments, to her brothers protesting odious governesses, to her sisters and best friend about men - upon the rejection of each of her first six marriage proposals, nagging her married sisters about their experiences, and...
Published on 12 Nov 2004 by Michele L. Worley

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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best of the Bridgertons, but charming nonetheless.
This is the fifth title in Julia Quinn's series of (hopefully) 8 stories about the Bridgerton siblings. Like many books of this genre, all are fairly cheesy and not entirely historically or culturally accurate! In ‘To Sir Philip, With Love’, Eloise Bridgerton finds her one true love in Sir Philip Crane, and they all live happily ever after. No surprise there,...
Published on 4 Aug 2003


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bridgerton sibling story: Eloise (mainly during April, 1824), 12 Nov 2004
By 
Michele L. Worley (Kingdom of the Mouse, United States) - See all my reviews
Instead of Lady Whistledown quotes, each chapter is headed by an extract from one of Eloise Bridgerton's letters: to her mother protesting childhood punishments, to her brothers protesting odious governesses, to her sisters and best friend about men - upon the rejection of each of her first six marriage proposals, nagging her married sisters about their experiences, and letters to Penelope complaining about what poor losers men are.
TO SIR PHILLIP is set immediately after ROMANCING MR. BRIDGERTON, and coincident with WHEN HE WAS WICKED. In broad outline, it has some similarities to Daphne's story in THE DUKE AND I, but with a still more extreme emotional situation for the male lead, in some ways.
Sir Phillip's mother, like Simon's, died in childbirth, leaving him to be brought up by a demanding father, though here prone to physical rather than emotional abuse. Like Simon, Philip found himself in scholarship, taking a first at university (though in botany rather than mathematics). Unlike Simon, Philip wasn't firstborn, and planned to remain at Cambridge as an academic. Philip's no rake, either; he wasn't the sort of "first-tier" bachelor whose status offset his lack of relationship skills much.
After his brother's death at Waterloo, however, Phillip (unlike Simon) opted to do his duty: making the family estate's agricultural aspects turn a profit (with botanical experiments on the side), and marrying his late brother's fiancee. Unfortunately Marina suffered from clinical depression, which only deepened after the birth of twins. Phillip's marriage became an endless strain upon him, effectively a single parent with *no* knowledge of householding or child-rearing, other than an iron determination not to follow his father's lead. Then the final blow fell: Marina's death after a botched suicide attempt.
Phillip receives a letter of condolence from cheerful chatterbox Eloise Bridgerton, a cousin of Marina's whom he's never met. Appreciating the gesture, he encloses a pressed flower with his response, thus beginning a long correspondence with Eloise (who loves writing letters, and had never before received such an enclosure). The story skims over this, as Phillip realizes that the right kind of wife would solve most of his problems: someone who can deal with his out-of-control seven-year-olds, and *not* be suicidal. Heck, a take-charge person who'd run *his* life is welcome to it, if she can straighten out the mess...
So the main story *really* begins when Eloise, in the wake of her best friend's marriage, opts to take Sir Philip up on his tentative invitation to visit with a view toward seeing if they'd suit. Unfortunately, she neglects to give *anyone* - from Sir Phillip with his rowdy children (whom he, in turn, neglected to mention) to her own matchmaking mother to her overprotective quartet of brothers - any warning of her plans.
Yes, Gregory is now old enough to join in one of the Bridgerton brothers' little chats with their sisters' suitors. (Reminiscent of the Pall Mall scene in THE VISCOUNT WHO LOVED ME, the Bridgertons at one point have a marksmanship contest.) On the plus side, although Eloise didn't learn much from Daphne's problems with their brothers, she and Francesca *did* have sense enough to pool their money years ago to bribe a maid into a frank discussion of the facts of life. :) (That doesn't explain, though, why Eloise never passed any information along to Penelope.)
In fact, despite her long-term frendship with Eloise, Penelope doesn't appear. (If she or Kate tagged along, the brothers might behave more sensibly in the presence of a grown-up.) Violet has only one scene. Benedict lives near Sir Phillip, though, so Eloise has Sophie to commiserate with. :)
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It started with a note..., 12 May 2007
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Book Gannet (Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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Eloise Bridgerton has always liked writing letters, so following the death of a distant cousin, it's only natural to send a letter of condolence. When Sir Phillip's reply includes a pressed flower Eloise is intrigued. It seems only natural for them to correspond, but after a year of writing to each other, Sir Phillip suggests the possibility of marraige - and Eloise doesn't know what to think.

At eight and twenty, Eloise is considered a spinster by the ton, but until recently that hasn't bothered her. It's not like she hasn't had the opportunity to marry - six rejected proposals attest to that - she has simply chosen not to. Not that she doesn't want to, but seeing the love her siblings have found, how can she possibly settle for anything less?

So, when her discontent rises up, Eloise sneaks out of London and travels to meet a man she has never met, but might, possibly, decide to marry.

Sir Phillip Crane has become something of a recluse following the death of his wife, he knows that, but in truth prefers the company of his plants to anything people have to offer. And then there are his children.

Eight-year old twins, Oliver and Amanda, are not the best behaved of children, and do their best to drive out any visitors to the house. When Eloise shows up unexpectedly it is soon clear all round that nothing is what anyone else expected.

Then, just as things begin to settle down, four very angry Bridgerton men come to call...

It's difficult to know what to expect from the first post-Lady Whistledown novel, because for me her columns have always been a vital part of what the Bridgertons are about. However, JQ admirably fills the void with excerpts of the many, many letters Eloise had written throughout her life. It's a perfect insight into the way this member of the family thinks.

She's headstrong, tenacious, curious and never afraid to speak her mind. The one thing she truly lacks is patience, and once she's made up her mind about something woebetide any who stand in her way.

Yet this book isn't really about Eloise, it's about Phillip. True, she has her fair share of point of view scenes, and the showdown with her brothers is both hilarious and touching, but she's essentially the same person from beginning to end.

In Phillip, however, we see a hero whose everyday is ruled by his past. He's a father who doesn't know how to treat his children, and only too happy to ignore their misdemeanours because he's terrified of what his temper might do. And yet he wants to remarry for his children's sake. His guilt over the death of his first wife and his reaction to it is so tightly wound within him that he doesn't speare a thought for himself. Until he meets Eloise, of course, and then everything changes.

Phillip's personal journey is what makes this story special, culminating in a beautifully touching final chapter that definitely pulls on the heartstrings.

Not that this book is merely sentimental - this is JQ after all. So we have the inclusion of the Bridgerton siblings, which always produces amusement. One of the best touches is the return of Colin's voracious appetite. Then there's the shooting match. It's also nice to finally meet Gregory again, last seen knocking Simon and Anthony into the Thames in 'The Duke and I'. Violet returns too, bringing that special magic of hers that never fails to make her appearences special.

Away from the Bridgertons, JQ once again introduces a wonderful pair of children - not that 'wonderful' refers to their behaviour. One of the recurring joys of JQ's books is the way she writes small children, and these two are no exception. At times it's almost more important that they get their happy ending than it is for Eloise.

Yet another fabulous tale from Julia Quinn, with delightful characters and an epilogue that is perfectly gorgeous.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A must for any Bridgerton Fan, 1 Aug 2003
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josie82 (Fife, Scotland, UK) - See all my reviews
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This is the 5th book in Julia Quinn's Bridgerton series following on from Romancing Mr Bridgerton.
This book deals with the story of Eloise, who runs away in answer to an invitation from a man she has been corresponding with for over a year but has never met.
I did enjoy this book and I found the characters to be believable and likeable although I did find there were instances where some of the things they thought and did seemed out of character based on what we had been told and learned of them. For example, although she had run away from home I found it hard to believe that Eloise would not give a thought to her mother or how she would be suffering not knowing where Eloise was. I was also on occasion annoyed by how dense Philip was being but I suppose that's about par for the course with men in general!!
The sub plot of Eloise dealing with the children also seemed to fade out and become less important as the book went on and I was disappointed that more couldn't have been done to wrap things up together nicely at the end.
Despite all the faults, I genuinely did like this book and I think those who are familiar with the Bridgertons will enjoy it as much as I did.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best of the Bridgertons, but charming nonetheless., 4 Aug 2003
By A Customer
This is the fifth title in Julia Quinn's series of (hopefully) 8 stories about the Bridgerton siblings. Like many books of this genre, all are fairly cheesy and not entirely historically or culturally accurate! In ‘To Sir Philip, With Love’, Eloise Bridgerton finds her one true love in Sir Philip Crane, and they all live happily ever after. No surprise there, then.
This book, like the others before it, is likely to make you smile. Perhaps even broadly at times. But for me, there was no laughing aloud as in Daphne and Simon's story (‘The Duke and I’) neither were there any seriously engaging feelings of empathy as in Anthony and Kate's book (‘The Viscount who Loved Me’). In those books, the heroines had character (albeit rather similar personalities, but Quinn won my approval by acknowledging that early on in the second book) and the heroes were (typically!) very arrogant and very sexy. To put it bluntly, the personalities in ‘An Offer from a Gentleman’ (Benedict and Sophie) I didn’t find terribly exciting and for most of ‘Romancing Mr Bridgerton’ (Colin and Penelope), I found the story, and particularly the attraction between Colin and Penelope, mostly implausible and not very romantic at all! In each of those two books, and again in this one, I had the distinct sense that Quinn was trying very hard to balance the need to distinguish each character from the next (or the last), with that of maintaining a level of familiarity for the reader with each of the Bridgertons. She didn’t quite manage it in my opinion, but to be fair, I have admired her departure from the archetypal angry (but deep down just scared), arrogant (but really just wanting to be loved), and borderline cruel hero in all of the last 3 in the Bridgerton series, which isn’t typical of historical romances. Colin and Benedict Bridgerton really are just nice guys!
Perhaps too much is made of the relative extremity of each of the siblings’ personalities in preceding books, so that Quinn doesn’t feel completely free to be totally adventurous with the characters in their own subsequent stories. But to be fair, little quirks like Colin’s huge appetite and Anthony’s fear of bees reappear in some of the other stories and the familiarity really can be quite charming.
Eloise and Philip's story is sweet enough, but the level of character development really isn't a patch on some of the other books. I was disappointed with Philip as a dashing, sexy hero (although at times felt there was so much potential), and Eloise I found mostly predictable (although I will admit that having a tendency to talk too much and to be quite direct myself might have had a lot to do with that!). The passion between them wasn’t entirely overwhelming either, and, let’s face it, that’s why one reads a book like this. Disappointingly, the banter between Eloise and Philip really could have been from any of the other Bridgerton books with the names merely swapped over, and I think if I had to read another book where they heroes were married by special licence, I might have to rip my hair out! Although, to be fair, in ‘Romancing Mr Bridgerton’, Colin and Penelope actually had a fairly decent wait of a couple of months before they were married.
More generally, the Bridgerton boys playing superheroes on horseback every time one of their sister's reputations is ‘at stake’, at what must be now over 40 years old (the eldest - Anthony - at least) really just gets a tad ridiculous and fairly tedious once you've seen it for the 5th time. But then, scenes like that may be part of the Bridgerton appeal, after all, I’ve now read all five, and am looking forward to the 6th (although to be honest, not as eagerly as I did some of the earlier books). As an aside, for those of us familiar with the other Bridgerton books, I wrote Julia Quinn an email right after I read Benedict’s story – I was convinced I knew who Lady Whistledown was and it turned out I was right! She wouldn’t say either way though and I had to wait almost a whole year to find out. Sad, isn’t it?

‘To Sir Philip, With Love’ is all very light-hearted, and an easy enough read, but not the funniest, and certainly not the most engaging of the Bridgerton tales. I'm loathe to criticise my beloved Bridgertons, but I’d say that 'To Sir Philip, With Love' is one whose appeal is much greater if read as part of the entire series. Nevertheless, another of the ever-charming Bridgerton stories, and one can’t help but look forward to the next.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it, 9 April 2008
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" Sir Phillip knew from his correspondence with his dead wife's distant cousin that Eloise Bridgerton was a spinster, and so he'd proposed, figuring that she'd be homely and unassuming, and more than a little desperate for an offer of marriage. Except ... she wasn't. The beautiful woman on his doorstep was anything but quite, and when she stopped talking long enough to close her mouth, all he wanted to do was to kiss her ...

Eloise Bridgerton couldn't marry a man she had never met! But then she started thinking ... and wondering ... and before she knew it, she was in a hired carriage in the middle of the night, on her way to meet the man she hoped might be her perfect match. Except ... he wasn't. Her perfect husband wouldn't be so moody and ill-mannered. And he certainly should have mentioned that he had two young - and decidedly unruly - children, as much in need of a mother as Phillip is in need of a wife. "

This, I found out a bit too late, is book 5 in the Bridgerton series and the first introduction to a new author. I must admit that I absolutely and utterly enjoyed each and every page of this book. I am quite certain to purchase the rest of the series. I find Julia Quinn's writing quite amusing and entertaining, the story gripping, the characters witty yet complex.
The characters are well thought of and described. I found the pace of the story a little to slow at times, however that did not ruin the experience for me.
The story has been introduced many times before me, so all I can say is, if you are looking for a "feel-good" , romantic story, something to brighten your mood and help you relax and smile, buy and read this book ! Very much recommended indeed !
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic Motif, 8 Jan 2014
Courtship through letters or emails, is one of my favourite romance motifs. Eloise Bridgerton is the most mysterious of Bridgertons. She surprises the reader at every turn. Sir Phillip is an eccentric, yet dashing figure and reminded me of the knights of old. He's distant at times yet we like him immensely. There are moments of hilarity, as when the Bridgerton brothers descend upon the unsuspecting Sir Phillip. There are moments of passion that leave the reader reeling...and once again there's a hot scene in the library. There's a bit of everything in this book. Great read!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'd want to be her, 31 Mar 2013
Review taken from my Blog Post (#79) in January 2011, after borrowing the book from the library.

Another sparkling and funny novel from Julia Quinn - I believe Book 5 in the Bridgerton Series).

The most appealing part of her work I have read so far is the unusual use of list, little bits and pieces of love letters etc. that she uses throughout. The pace is also generally quick, and more importantly, quick witted.

Following the death of his wife, Sir Phillip Crane enters into a correspondence with her distant cousin, Eloise Bridgerton a spinster the wrong end of 20.

He needs a wife to manage his household, but even more than that somebody to manage his very out of control eight year old twins. From the letters Eloise seems the kind of unassuming and homely girl that would fit the ticket exactly. After a year of correspondence he recommends that she come for a visit and see if they would suit in marriage. She need only let him know and he would arrange a suitable companion.

Obviously, Eloise couldn't marry a man she had never met, so she organised herself the hire of a carriage and hied off during a family ball. She thought she'd left a note for her Mother on the hall table .... she forgot to advise Sir Phillip she was coming!

Therefore he was a more than a little put out on her arrival ..... and proved moody and ill-mannered - the twins proved unruly and very much in need of a mother.

How can all this conclude happily? I hear you thinking ..... well you will just have to read it too ........ but definitely won't be disappointed along the way. A 4.5 Star read - I just need to score some more of the Bridgerton Series (not sure if they are all in print though).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars average, 4 Sep 2006
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this was a typical bridgerton story. there are a few amusing parts and reads easily and quickly. one of the better books of the series which started well but got a bit lost with so many brothers and sisters to marry off. amusing scenes are when the children first meet with eloise and then the brothers untimely arrival, with famiiar family rivalaries
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eloise's story., 4 July 2003
"To Sir Phillip with love" is a typical Julia Quinn novel, you laugh at the heroine's antics and you find yourself sad when the story ends, although it HAS a happy ending.
Eloise Bridgerton is the fifth of the Bridgerton brothers and sisters (preceeded by Anthony, Benedict, Colin and Daphne. Succeeded by Francesca, Gregory and Hyacinth.) She disappeared in the end of Julia Quinn's last novel: "Romancing Mr. Bridgerton" and we now find out where she went and why her fingers were ink-stained in the previous book.
Sir Phillip Crane is a widower with two unruly children. He is a botanist and has absolutely no idea to how he's supposed to act around the two eight-year-old twins.
Since this *is* a romantic novel, naturally the two of them meet.
I really recommend this book, I found myself laughing out loud several times, crying because the story reached a sad place and wanting to smack the hero and the heroine in the head so that they would talk about the things they wanted to say to oneanother.
It isn't necessary to read any of the other Bridgerton novels to understand this one, but it makes it MUCH more entertaining, and you'll really understand some of the comments that are made by the Bridgerton brothers (who naturally arrive on scene to save their sister's virtue) and Colin's relationship with food...
Enjoy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very good read., 17 Jan 2014
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This review is from: To Sir Phillip, With Love (Bridgerton Family Book 5) (Kindle Edition)
Julia Quinn writes in a very readable style. It is difficult to put the book down until you reach the end.
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