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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating but Unstructered
Full of mind-blowing and fascinating facts and theories. It's difficult to dismiss the author's proposition that advanced civilisation dates back thousands of years earlier than is currently the "official" view and that these early civilisations may have been virtually wiped out by the catastrophic flooding and volcanic and earthquake activity accompying the ending of the...
Published on 28 Feb 2011 by Miker

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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not totally convincing
Fingerprints of the Gods seems to be the type of book that is either loved or loathed, either convincing people utterly, or leaving them mocking its credibility. I don't particularly stand in either camp.
Although many of the theories are interesting, and even possible, they are probably not the answers to the mysteries highlighted and the questions asked. Just...
Published on 23 July 2004 by Gryph


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating but Unstructered, 28 Feb 2011
Full of mind-blowing and fascinating facts and theories. It's difficult to dismiss the author's proposition that advanced civilisation dates back thousands of years earlier than is currently the "official" view and that these early civilisations may have been virtually wiped out by the catastrophic flooding and volcanic and earthquake activity accompying the ending of the last Ice Age.

But I do wish the book had been properly edited. It is full of repitition and is not presented in any sort of logical order. It could have been 30% shorter. Nevertherless well worth reading.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not totally convincing, 23 July 2004
Fingerprints of the Gods seems to be the type of book that is either loved or loathed, either convincing people utterly, or leaving them mocking its credibility. I don't particularly stand in either camp.
Although many of the theories are interesting, and even possible, they are probably not the answers to the mysteries highlighted and the questions asked. Just because there are flaws in accepted Egyptology, that does not mean that a race of super humans built the pyramids.
Hancock raises some very good points, and finds fascinating correlations in the themes of ancient myth. Unfortunately the conclusions he comes up with leave many more questions than you were faced with in the first place, and seem a bit too far fetched to be totally credible. His opinions may point to a different truth than that accepted by the close minded members of the archeological and scientific community, but in taking things too far into the extreme he will not be taken as a credible source by those he seeks to challenge.
The ideas put forward left me with the same feelings I have when reading conspiracy theory websites or books - it all seems possible, but when all weighed up after the event it just all seems too unlikely to wholly believe.
FOTG was definitely an interesting read, but rather than changing my life, as others have stated, it just changed the way I view ancient prehistory and the way it is perceived by modern scholars.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars prepare to change your view of ancient civilisations!, 10 Feb 2000
By A Customer
I read this book in 1997, after having it recommended to me by a colleague. Since reading it, the subject matter has become one of my main interests. Books in a similar vein that I have gone on to read are from authors such as Robert Buval, Adrian Gilbert, Michael Baigent and Colin Wilson. 'Fingerprints' is one of the most compelling and informative books I have ever read. He brings so many ideas and theories together regarding ancient structures and civilisations and the final equation is no less awesome by having to wait 500 pages for it to be revealed. It is still highly compelling two years after reading it initially, and it cannot fail to change the way we view mainstream archaelogical theories on the timescales of human civilisation. The book is easy to follow, and he tells us of his journeys to many sites, descriptions of which make the reader long to see for themselves. He poses so many questions within each chapter to get the reader exploring in their own mind the evidence and possible answers there may be for what he describes. It is incredible to think that theories discussed in this book are still questioned when the answers are there for all to see in places such as Egypt and South America. I think this book should be complusory reading for all!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great entertainment, 29 July 2007
By 
Ray Blake (Hemel Hempstead, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Whether you subscribe to Hancock's theories or not, there is no denying that this is an excellent read, thoroughly well-researched and written in an engaging and involving way.

Personally, I felt that the book should have sought to ask some of its questions without then feeling the need to speculate wildly to answer them. Nevertheless, it is a fascinating read and this new edition is worth the money even if you have the original.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and Thought-Provoking, 18 Sep 2008
By 
Graham Hancock is one of the leaders in the modern "avant garde" school of thought whereby we should question what we are told by "orthodox" science, and take a fresh look at the evidence left to us by ancient civilisations. Along with Robert Bauval, Rand Flem-Ath, Colin Wilson, Christopher Dunn, and others, he is the scourge of "established theory" and breathes a breath of fresh air into the age-old questions of "who are we?" and "how did we get here?". He doesn't go quite as far as Erich Von Däniken did, but he prompts us to re-think several accepted ideas and have another look.

The Piri Reis Map - the coastline of Antarctica has lain under a hefty chunk of ice for some thousands of years, and yet a map drawn in the early 16th century (probably taken from even older sources) depicts the coastline almost identically to the one carried out in the Geophysical Year studies of 1958. It's also been established that the projection used on Piri Reis corresponds with a NASA projection from....somewhere over Cairo.

The Pyramid/Orion Connection - the three Giza Pyramids correspond exactly to the configuration of the three stars of Orion's Belt, complete with the slight offset of the smallest Pyramid. The position of the Pyramids vis-a-vis the Nile, corresponds to the relationship between Orion's Belt and the Milky Way in....10,500 B.C. The Sphinx at that time would have looked directly at the constellation Leo - which presumably it represented - all proven by computer analysis, and in addition, taking into account the precession of the equinoxes.

Various monuments in South America depict faces with distinctly African and Caucasian features - thousands of years before the New World was discovered - and ancient sites like the Temple Of The Moon at Machu Picchu seem to depict the solar system long before the discovery of the outer planets.

Hancock's view is that there was an ancient advanced civilisation in existence before the Ice Age, and some cataclysm wiped it out - he speculates, as does Flem-Ath, that there was a "crustal displacement of the Earth" which sent Antarctica from the temperate Atlantic Ocean, some 2000 miles south to its present location. This neatly explains how the Antarctic coastline could have been navigable in the remote past.

Hancock creates a convincing case that these and other "Fingerprints" have the same advanced civilisation in common.

Granted, we will presumably never find conclusive proof of this civilisation (unless and until we can remove Antarctica's ice layer!) but Hancock surely has written one of the best analyses on this subject to date.

The book is lavishly illustrated and is an easy read despite its initially daunting size.

As companion volumes to "Fingerprints" - try "The Atlantis Blueprint" by Rand Flem-Ath and Colin Wilson, and/or "The Orion Mystery" by Robert Bauval and Adrian Gilbert. Compelling reading.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Never mind Y2K; it's 2012 we need to worry about, 22 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This book is fantastic. Not for those with closed minds, to be sure, but for anyone with an interest in the pyramids, Atlantis, the Incas or the Aztecs or who finds the idea that Western science knows the answers depressing this is essential reading. I have read and re-read this book a dozen times and still have no idea how much of Hancock's theory I believe. But at the end of the day, it's intriguing and, dare I say it, entertaining.
The book opens with mediaeval maps which accurately depict the coastline of Antartica, despite the fact that it's been under miles of ice since the dawn of history. Rattling through flood myths which are pretty much identical all over the world, the mysteries of the lines on the Nazca plain, harbours built miles from the coast, pyramids that we could not build today, the precession of the equinoxes and much more Hancock reaches his conclusion in breathless style. (I would say that the conclusion is startling, but you do pretty much see where he's headed from the off.)
Some people will dismiss the whole book as bunkum, saying that you can twist the facts and suppositions to fit whatever theories you like. And they may well be right. But unlike other books which put the pyramids down to little green men from mars or magic, Hancock offers us a more convincing explanation. Even if you accept the 'conventional' ages of the pyramids, then I just cannot understand why the later ones are falling down while the oldest are still in pretty much perfect nick. The story of civilisations all over the world is that we get better at things as time goes on, not worse.
A fascinating and thought provoking read, with a sobering conclusion. Anyone for an end of the world party round at mine in 2012?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be compulsory reading!, 29 Nov 2011
By 
T. J. Walton "Tim Walton" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book is so well researched and thought through, it should be compulsory reading. No wild speculation without foundation, but reasoned and realistic. No assumptions passed down and accepted from the ignorant. Open minded and incise.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars you cannot be serious !, 10 Sep 2000
By A Customer
Ok, so maybe he is. This book is a great read, it is well illustrated and strangley plausable. here is the but.... it seems to me that the conclusionhad already been reached before the book even began. The 1st chapter-"the mystery of the maps " in one fell swoop seems to prove the existence of previous now lost civilisations . Hancock would have been better served giving us a more detailed examination of this area as a means of proving his theory. The rest of the book seems to be like cutting pieces from a jigsaw puzzle to make them all fit. Everything that is written is possible - not to mention plausable and seems to fit the theory. but as the bbc horizons program on this pointed out, there are some serious errors and ommissions in relation to the orion hypothesis (his star maps are upside down), and angkor wat as a map of a constellation. That said, as a whole the book is thought provoking and intensly interesting and entertaining. Even if like me you are a sceptic, dont dismiss it. Read it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars compelling read., 12 Jan 2004
By 
There will be those who will like a book like this, and there will be those who will never like books that have the capacity of turning one's world view upside down...
It takes an open mind to absorb and evaluate the flood of information presented in this book, a willingness to go beyond what one has learned before as the so-called accepted truth...
It is very much part of the flock-like human character to want to discard the compelling flood of anomalies as irrelevant, dangerous, or worse.
Some comments in these reviews point in that very direction...
Admittely, the book is written from a "let's show established archaeology how it's done" point of view, a little scholar-bashing if you will, but the long list of hints, proofs, hunches, etc. does make one wonder what might lay under thosemiles of ice over Antarctica.
Let's wait and see what the first digs in Antarctica will produce...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indy chasing the laws of precession, 17 April 2000
By A Customer
I am really glad this became a huge-selling best seller - glad that its insight, quality, and urgent importance didn't dwarf its sales , as it , sadly many times happen with many other radical works. This is not just a must-read ; Hancock's travels and searches are a heritage for all of us - as of course was the work on the same field of a few other researchers before him, who didn't get as famous as Hancock did. Well, it's great he did.. Most importantly - this book is shaking the foundations of Egyptogoly, and of many other "established" ways of thinking about our "past"... Ways of thinking that are now the basis of education and a norm distributed through the media. Things should change - this book is throwing some light onto our ignorance and darkness, and poses intriguing questions. It can be read as a transatlantic, transpacific Indiana Jones adventure , as well, if you want.. only this time it's based on real-life, disturbing facts...
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