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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Album..., 15 Aug 2006
By 
DSR (out beyond the sticks) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
I could never get on with "Tarkus". It just sounds rushed to me. This one, on the other hand, seems to get the recipe just right. It continues the complexity (and dexterity) of the first two albums, but presents the music with a little more consideration and subtlety in my opinion. The whole thing has stood the test of time too, despite being very much OF its time, if you see what I mean.

The recording and production is superb for the era too, as is the CD mastering, only needing a decent quality HiFi system to do it full justice.

Much as I like and respect ELP's other albums (except "Love Beach"), THIS is the one I return to every so often and really enjoy.

If all you have is the dire sounding mid seventies "Manticore" LP, you'll have the shock of your life playing the CD for the first time. If you have an original UK "Island" cut, you'll be delighted that the quality and subtlety has been retained, enhanced even, with much cleaner bass notes, and little or no tape hiss to get in the way...

RECOMMENDED!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favourite ELP and in my top 5 prog classics, 20 Oct 2008
By 
John Ferngrove (Hants UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
I really loved everything ELP did up until Brain Salad Surgery, which was interesting, but even I, who am a big fan of symphonic pomp, started to feel at this stage they'd gone over the top.

This is my favourite ELP album because it captures Emerson's Piano playing at its imaginative best but is balanced nicely with the synthesizers that he was blazing the trail with. Compositionally as well, I find this album their most balanced, consisting of distinct and well crafted songs, that aren't bloated pastiches of things crammed together like Tarkus or pick'n'mix collage like Pictures at an Exhibition.

First track, credited as three, is the Endless Enigma parts 1 and 2 with the oustanding jazz piano trio, Fugue, sandwiched between them. Part 1 starts very atmospherically with synth sounds that had never been heard before in their day. Part 2 is a mighty finale. Throughout we hear Greg Lake's superb, always note perfect voice, move from angelic restraint to finish at full power.

Then we get a handful of straightforward songs. A sweet acoustic ballad. A jokey cowboy saloon piece and then the skit on Copelands Hoedown, which would actually have a popular impact outside underground audiences.

We then have what is my favourite. The title track Trilogy. First part is Emerson at his most romantic with Rachmaninov like piano. This eventually gives way to a storming 5/4 middle section that has just the meanest underlying rife with an absolutely spiteful moog solo over the top. The third section is a more restrained organ solo making space for some really pounding percussion from Palmer.

Then another song, Living Sin which is twisted and salacious. Has a very nice fanfair ending.

The Final track is the mighty Abaddon's Bolero. No one was ever sure if Abaddon actually existed. Like Ravel's, its starts very tiny, with a theme that repeats, and repeats. Unlike Ravel's it's a march, that builds relentlessly in size and power until ending on a huge and sudden climax.

Another point, is that I only learned to actually listen to drummers later in life, and only with my recent ELP purchases have I come to appreciate what a mighty fine drummer indeed Carl Palmer was.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best ELP Album for me, 28 Oct 2009
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
I'm just getting back into ELP and this is the best album. Possibly because this is the one I've listened to the most (I'm easily persuaded like that).
I've been comparing Trilogy to Brain Salad Surgery. The latter is best known for Karn Evil 9. Its a Classic. No doubt. And for Brain Salad Surgery itself of-course. (Note this is an extra track)
But Trilogy is better because all of the tracks are memorable - there's great contrast and its just...the best.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rock for those with an appreciation classical music, 15 April 2008
By 
Graham Mccarthy "gmccarthy15" (Cheshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
Lets face it, most rock music isn't, well, very intellectually challenging, and compared to classical works it's simplistic and a bit on the thin side. Lyrically, most barely makes it above GCSE standard (I'll maybe make an exception for Dylan and Springsteen). Sure the bands can put on a good show and most play competently enough, but they're too frequently found wanting musically. ELP are perhaps the only band to really try and bridge the gap between the depth and sophistication of classical music and the energy and bravado of rock. Emerson is classically trained (although not formally) and is a true keyboard virtuoso, Palmer is a classically trained percussionist and arguably the best technical rock drummer and Lake is a more than competent bassist with an rich and versatile voice.

Trilogy is a well crafted collection of songs that are easy to listen to. A minority of ELP fans would suggest that this is their best album, I can hear their point but I'm not sure I agree, it's all subjective of course. Trilogy starts off with the Endless Enigma which is lyrically reminiscent of King Crimson but musically is pure Emerson with his fondness for developing themes in his music. It is punctuated by a quite brilliant Bach like fugue of great complexity that admirably showcases Emerson's undoubted ability.

The Sheriff is one of ELP's light hearted music hall pieces played on honky-tonk piano and is a parody of all those Hollywood westerns.

From the Beginning is a pleasant and relaxed ballad by Lake that showcases, briefly, some of his acoustic guitar skills. And works as a counterpoint for the first piece.

Hoedown is an instrumental piece by Aaron Copland that re-enforced the Western theme from the Sheriff. It was later to become the opening piece for the band's live performances where they played it at breakneck speed.

The title track Trilogy is a piece in three movements and is a departure for Emerson where he abandons his more percussive style for a more melodic one. It culminates in a frenetic movement where Lake underpins the piece whilst Emerson and Palmer interweave keyboards and drums to form the melody - very impressive if a little self indulgent.

Living Sin is a subtle blues and classical mix but ultimately fails to impress and sounds one of the weaker pieces on the album.

Bolero is based upon the structure of Ravel's Bolero but the melody is quite different. Bolero uses overdubs to build an impressive crescendo exploring different tones and themes along the way.

Trilogy is a coherent and cohesive collection of songs that makes an excellent introduction to the works of ELP. Not too self indulgent and no 20 minute prog-rock monsters. It is rock, but rock for those with an appreciation of the classical and that like an intellectual challenge.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Keith Emerson turns in his synthesizer for a good old piano, 3 Jan 2005
By 
Lawrance M. Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
There two things I always remember about ELP's "Trilogy" is that every time the beginning of "From the Beginning" played on the radio it sounded so much like the beginning of "Roundabout" by Yes, and that the end of "Living Sin" was used as the theme music for one of the local television news shows in Albuquerque (think early years of "Eyewitness News").
"Trilogy" was the third album from Emerson, Lake & Palmer, the British Progressive (nee Classical) Rock group and it is certainly interesting in retrospect to consider those first three albums as a set. On their self-entitled debut album, ELP offered a balance between tracks featuring synthesizer overkill by keyboard virtuoso Keith Emerson and the melodic compositions of guitarist Greg Lake, wherein Emerson turned in his organ for a piano. Their second album, "Tarkus," went in the first direction, with the Tarkus Suite representing their best effort along those lines. "Trilogy," represents the other direction of ELP, one which I personally favor.
The two parts of "The Endless Enigma" are bridged by a "Fugue," that shows ELP's interest in pursuing classical musical forms, as does the final track, "Abaddon's Bolero." "The Sheriff" is one of those cute ditties the group tended to indulge in a bit too much, while "Hoedown" from Aaron Copeland's "Rodeo" is one of their better direct adaptations of a classical work. "Trilogy" and "From the Beginning" highlight the instrumentality of the group in a clearer, cleaner style. All in all, the high points on "Trilogy" are not as strong as on their debut album, but this certainly got ELP back on track for my money.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Their Best Album, 20 Sep 2011
By 
P. Ronayne "Pablo" (Liverpool UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
This could be ELPs best album. In many ways a synthesis of their first two albums with a much better production that even diehard ELP haters admit they prefer before 'Emerson Lake & Palmer' and 'Tarkus' So what changed? Well, nothing except that the band had become more polished and their material more diverse. The production was the major difference over the earlier works-more commercial possibly, classier definitely.

This is certainly an album to return to again and again. I always find something different after a break. The Endless Enigma (both parts and Fugue) is the albums's highlight and is probably the piece I would play to someone who had never heard the band before.This is classy, timeless music with all three members of the group at their very best, Lake's vocals are back to his King Crimson best, Palmer's drumming is incredibly controlled and tight, Emerson's keyboards sounding magisterial.

There is a wonderful fusion about this album. The early 1970s was a great time for experimentation in music and ELP were at the forefront of breaking new ground in what was possible. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn't. Here it works very well indeed with a mixture of Rock, Jazz, Classical, Pop, Pastiche and Boogie. A great album from a great band at their peak.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Found it again., 15 May 2009
By 
SWB "SWB" (Somerset, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Trilogy (MP3 Download)
I was never really a big ELP fan but I liked this album when it came out.I had originally on cassette, you remember the cassettes surely? and one of the tracks started on one side and finished on the other. So now I have it complete and for 3 which is probably less than I paid in 1972.
For me of there type they were the best. Buy and enjoy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Having seen this super group at the Sheffield City hall in 1971 at ..., 11 July 2014
By 
M. Wadkin "Mike Wadkin" (South Yorkshire,England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
Having seen this super group at the Sheffield City hall in 1971 at the start of their fame.It is a must for any ELP fan
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good purchase, 4 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Trilogy (MP3 Download)
Bought to replace the audio cassette version that no longer works and I hadn't played for a long time.
Forgot how good this album is.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic ELP album, 20 April 2013
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This review is from: Trilogy (MP3 Download)
In my view this is the definitive ELP album and a prime example of the progressive music genre. As you would expect the playing is superb and every track is a classic. A must have album for prog rock fans.
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