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4.7 out of 5 stars18
4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 23 June 2011
Unmistaken Child took me into a world I am less familiar with but, nonetheless, remain totally open minded about, the Buddhist belief in reincarnation. This touching documentary highlights the true and utter devotion of one Buddhist monk and his search for the reincarnation of his Buddhist master. The beauty and sensitivity with which this documentary has been crafted exquisitely demonstrates the way of Buddhism and its unrelenting reverence to the Buddha. The spiritual enlightenment and the searing emotional entanglement of human existence is played out to the full in this truly amazing story of dedication and whilst there were some difficult scenes with which the westerner may struggle initially to understand, you can only emerge from watching this documentary wiser and far, far more enlightened.
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on 3 November 2011
This Documentary should be watched, loved, and cherished. It is thought-provoking, charming, deep and meaningful, it simply made me stop and think about my life and all the small things I neglect on a day to day basis that are so important to me. This genius piece of film transcends a spiritual faith that is so strong it is hard not to become immersed and compelled by Buddhism.

I thoroughly recommend this DVD it has to be a strong contender for the best documentary of all time. If for nothing else, this film should be watch for the stunning cinematography and the adorable nature of the baby boy, Tenzin Phuntsok Rinpoche, however, I cannot believe anyone who watches this documentary will walk away unaffected by its moving and beautiful truth.

I honestly feel that words cannot do this documentary justice... so buy it, watch it and thank me after for my recommendation :)
0Comment|15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 December 2011
This is a thought provoking and beautiful film in which a young buddhist monk searches for the reincarnation of his master. On one level the film shows us this earch and its extraordinary outcome and on another level, it shows the very human story surrounding this search and the hopes, fears and faith of those involved.
So very different from our experience in the West, it nevertheless was captivating viewing and I can highly recommend it.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 3 October 2011
Complex. moving, thought provoking and beautifully shot, with a great
score.

I struggled a bit philosophically at first while watching, since I've
been trained in a more western tradition of Buddhism, and don't take
the concept of reincarnation literally. And I had an even harder time
seeing a tiny child taken from it's family with no say as to his fate.

But then I realized that the documentary - which is told without
narration - isn't taking sides on whether reincarnation is real,
whether this child actually is the reincarnation of the former llama
(there are some moments that seem to actively raise question, where it
looks like the boy may being guided to give the right answers). It's
simply displaying a way of life and a tradition that has gone on for
hundreds of years. One that includes the cruelty of separating a child
and his family, but that has also led to such important figures as the
current Dali Llama, who has done so much for world peace.

And, in turn that leads to bigger, important questions about how we
raise children. If we never forced children directions against their
will at times, we might never have some of our greatest figures in
religion, leadership, arts, etc. But in doing so, do we also in some
way harm the soul of that child? Where is the line between freedom and
tradition?

These are important questions, and the film raises them with skill and
grace, without attempting to force an easy answer.

It's also the very emotional journey of the young monk charged with the
difficult and uncertain task of finding the reincarnation of the man he
loved and served for many years. Whatever your beliefs, you can't help
but care for this charismatic and vulnerable monk on his physically,
emotionally and spiritually challenging journey.
0Comment|11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 January 2010
This is a wonderful account of a 'heart disciple's' search for his reincarnated Master. It explores both the personal and physical aspects of his journey, with beautiful footage of the Himalayas and a culture steeped in spiritual aspiration, love and respect for each other, and inherent understanding of our connectedness to the Divine. I loved it, have watched it numerous times, and given it to friends.
11 comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 July 2010
***SPOILERS AHOY!***
Writing as a practising Buddhist, I saw this gem on TV late one night (it was actually shown on BBC4 as 'The Baby and The Buddha', so watch out for it). Other reviews commend the beauty and emotion of the film, the breath-taking landscapes, and while these are all indeed true, it was the 'affirmation' that touched me most. Let me explain what I mean...

Firstly let me apologise for putting such a heavy Buddhist slant on this; I'm hoping there are like-minded people out there who can appreciate what I'm about to say! If not and you're just curious, thanks for looking!

OK, here we go.... Watching the child react to being given the Rosary Beads that were his in the previous life, and how he puts them around his neck and won't be parted from them; his reaction to the finger drums, the bells etc of that earlier life; how he shows an unshakeable confidence and authority when granting blessings to his disciples, and so on. I found this to be very jarring to watch, and it has been an enormous inspiration to my Dharma practice (following the Buddhist Path).

Us 'Westerners' have and will always struggle with the Buddhist belief of Rebirth, and the conditions that naturally arise from this (such as the existence of the 6 Realms, Mother-Beings, etc), but this superb film spells out to us that these aren't just mystical traditions, but ACTUAL occurrences. What better proof do our inquisitive and questioning minds need?

Think about it. If you watch the film with a sincere heart, you will become convinced that the child is indeed the Buddhist Geshe reborn, or a 'Rinpoche'. Therefore, rebirth at the end of this life will definitely happen for us all, and it follows that it HAS happened to us countless times before. My Wife struggles with a lot of these concepts, but now I have actual proof to wave under her nose! It's up to us 'Westerners' to suspend our disbelief, and embrace this seemingly far-fetched idea as actual fact. That is why I feel that this film is so important.

In the film, Geshe-La was reborn in a Human form because of his life-long devotion to the Three Jewels; if we follow the example ourselves and practice Dharma purely and sincerely (as laypersons like me, not necessarily as fully ordained Monks) then we will surely be reborn in the Human Realm, and have the precious opportunity to continue our Dharma practices.

So, that's what I meant when I said that I found the film to be 'affirming'. It strengthens one's faith in the Buddhist belief of Rebirth, which then inspires one's study of Dharma, and in taking Refuge in the Three Jewels.

Amazing stuff. Every Buddhist should own a copy. Click the buy button RIGHT NOW!lll lol

Thanks for reading :-)
0Comment|15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 3 October 2011
Complex. moving, thought provoking and beautifully shot, with a great
score.

I struggled a bit philosophically at first while watching, since I've
been trained in a more western tradition of Buddhism, and don't take
the concept of reincarnation literally. And I had an even harder time
seeing a tiny child taken from it's family with no say as to his fate.

But then I realized that the documentary - which is told without
narration - isn't taking sides on whether reincarnation is real,
whether this child actually is the reincarnation of the former llama
(there are some moments that seem to actively raise question, where it
looks like the boy may being guided to give the right answers). It's
simply displaying a way of life and a tradition that has gone on for
hundreds of years. One that includes the cruelty of separating a child
and his family, but that has also led to such important figures as the
current Dali Llama, who has done so much for world peace.

And, in turn that leads to bigger, important questions about how we
raise children. If we never forced children directions against their
will at times, we might never have some of our greatest figures in
religion, leadership, arts, etc. But in doing so, do we also in some
way harm the soul of that child? Where is the line between freedom and
tradition?

These are important questions, and the film raises them with skill and
grace, without attempting to force an easy answer.

It's also the very emotional journey of the young monk charged with the
difficult and uncertain task of finding the reincarnation of the man he
loved and served for many years. Whatever your beliefs, you can't help
but care for this charismatic and vulnerable monk on his physically,
emotionally and spiritually challenging journey.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 July 2010
For those who love Tibet or just beautiful scenery with beautiful and caring people then this is a must. I found it quite brilliant. A sweet and dedicated young Buddist monk is charged with the great responsibility of finding the next Dalai Lama and we follow his journey throughout Tibet. An engaging and delightful film.
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on 30 April 2013
i really injoyed this cd It isnt like full hd but still very watchable I could watch it again & again
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 February 2015
A very enjoyable story and sad in parts especially when the little Rinpoche was having his head shaved and parting from his mum. I am not a believer in reincarnation and see this part of Buddhism as a type of adoption how else would these lineages survive since monks are unable to produce their own sons. I have no doubt that the little Rinpoche was loved very much by his faithful attendant and well looked after but its not the same as a parents love. I can see the potential possibly for later emotional problems when the boy matures.
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