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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Album...
I could never get on with "Tarkus". It just sounds rushed to me. This one, on the other hand, seems to get the recipe just right. It continues the complexity (and dexterity) of the first two albums, but presents the music with a little more consideration and subtlety in my opinion. The whole thing has stood the test of time too, despite being very much OF its time, if you...
Published on 15 Aug. 2006 by DSR

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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star
Played fine as CD but could not get the DVD to play at all
Published 1 month ago by Emjay


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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Album..., 15 Aug. 2006
By 
DSR (out beyond the sticks) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
I could never get on with "Tarkus". It just sounds rushed to me. This one, on the other hand, seems to get the recipe just right. It continues the complexity (and dexterity) of the first two albums, but presents the music with a little more consideration and subtlety in my opinion. The whole thing has stood the test of time too, despite being very much OF its time, if you see what I mean.

The recording and production is superb for the era too, as is the CD mastering, only needing a decent quality HiFi system to do it full justice.

Much as I like and respect ELP's other albums (except "Love Beach"), THIS is the one I return to every so often and really enjoy.

If all you have is the dire sounding mid seventies "Manticore" LP, you'll have the shock of your life playing the CD for the first time. If you have an original UK "Island" cut, you'll be delighted that the quality and subtlety has been retained, enhanced even, with much cleaner bass notes, and little or no tape hiss to get in the way...

RECOMMENDED!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favourite ELP and in my top 5 prog classics, 20 Oct. 2008
By 
John Ferngrove (Hants UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
I really loved everything ELP did up until Brain Salad Surgery, which was interesting, but even I, who am a big fan of symphonic pomp, started to feel at this stage they'd gone over the top.

This is my favourite ELP album because it captures Emerson's Piano playing at its imaginative best but is balanced nicely with the synthesizers that he was blazing the trail with. Compositionally as well, I find this album their most balanced, consisting of distinct and well crafted songs, that aren't bloated pastiches of things crammed together like Tarkus or pick'n'mix collage like Pictures at an Exhibition.

First track, credited as three, is the Endless Enigma parts 1 and 2 with the oustanding jazz piano trio, Fugue, sandwiched between them. Part 1 starts very atmospherically with synth sounds that had never been heard before in their day. Part 2 is a mighty finale. Throughout we hear Greg Lake's superb, always note perfect voice, move from angelic restraint to finish at full power.

Then we get a handful of straightforward songs. A sweet acoustic ballad. A jokey cowboy saloon piece and then the skit on Copelands Hoedown, which would actually have a popular impact outside underground audiences.

We then have what is my favourite. The title track Trilogy. First part is Emerson at his most romantic with Rachmaninov like piano. This eventually gives way to a storming 5/4 middle section that has just the meanest underlying rife with an absolutely spiteful moog solo over the top. The third section is a more restrained organ solo making space for some really pounding percussion from Palmer.

Then another song, Living Sin which is twisted and salacious. Has a very nice fanfair ending.

The Final track is the mighty Abaddon's Bolero. No one was ever sure if Abaddon actually existed. Like Ravel's, its starts very tiny, with a theme that repeats, and repeats. Unlike Ravel's it's a march, that builds relentlessly in size and power until ending on a huge and sudden climax.

Another point, is that I only learned to actually listen to drummers later in life, and only with my recent ELP purchases have I come to appreciate what a mighty fine drummer indeed Carl Palmer was.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Trilogy 2015 audio quality, 13 Jun. 2015
By 
Mike Le Voi - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
I will not review the music – ELP lovers already know the music and love it. This review is of the remaster/remix and how they compare with the original CD.

Firstly, let us examine CD 1. This is marked on the documentation as a remaster of the original CD. Well, it may very well be but there are a couple of issues. Firstly, the tape recorder used to make this master is not running at the same speed as the original CD. Example: The Endless Enigma Part 1 is 6’41” on the original CD. On the remaster, the track is 6’39”, when you allow for the greater “lead in”.

Secondly, the levels of hiss make this CD unlistenable in many places. The opening of The Endless Enigma has hiss levels that are really pronounced, especially on headphones. This hiss is not noticeable on the original CD. It is almost as though the treble has been boosted for effect. Hoedown, for example, on the remastered CD is much brighter than the original CD. Similarly, the tape noise at the beginning of Trilogy is far more pronounced on the new remaster. In general, you are better off listening to the original CD than this one.

Next, let us discuss the new stereo remix on CD 2. As others have commented, there is minimal, if any hiss, better quality and more separation in places. It is a great shame that the multi-track masters used to make this mix were not used to make an “original mix” of the original CD. In general, the new remix is excellent. However, there are some questionable mix changes. For example, at 5 minutes into Abaddon’s Bolero the bass part on the original CD is quite clear. On the remix it is faded into the background. This is an unpardonable error, in my opinion. On the original CD, this variation is used to highlight a new melody in the bass. On the remix, the bass melody has all but disappeared!

On Living Sin, the track is quite different for about 8 bars at the 2 minute mark! I thought this was supposed to be a remix, not a different version? This is really not acceptable. Also in the same track, the brass synths on the original CD at the end of the track are loud and clear. On the remix, they are muted and the effect is lost.

There are other differences you will either like or hate. Having said this, I am glad to own this CD. It certainly brings new insights to a treasured part of my life and makes me listen to the complex harmonies in a new light.

Finally, on the DVD, there are 24 bit/96 KHz versions of each mix. One would expect each to be nothing more than a high quality version of CD 1 or CD 2. This is not the case! CD 2 appears to be a remaster of the new 24/96 recording. CD 2 is “punchier” than the 24/96 version. In other words, it has been slightly compressed and the EQ is different. I suspect that this was done to make CD 2 more “like” CD 1. Both mixes are acceptable. Just be warned that they are not the same.

I make no comment on the 5.1 mix. I am on holiday, so I am looking forward to being reunited with my surround sound system when I return home! One last point of note is that when I reviewed the DVD-A of Brain Salad Surgery, I stated that you can use foobar2000 and the DVD-A decoder component to extract the MLP 24/96 data as FLAC or WAV. The same is true of this DVD-A. Use of this software allows those who do not own dedicated DVD-A players to listen to the hi-res audio.

Make no mistake. This CD+DVD package is a huge bargain at 8 quid. Just be warned that some parts of the remix may not be to your liking.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of their finest., 9 May 2001
By 
John Peter O'connor - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
ELP fans will happily debate forever the point at which the band reached its creative peak but there is a firm consensus that their early years were their finest. Whether the absolute best was Tarkus, Trilogy or Brain Salad Surgery is secondary to the simple fact that Trilogy is one of the finest pieces of work that this band did.
The secret of their music is that they put together a set of talents the like of which had rarely been seen before let alone moulded into a single unit. The opening salvo, (The Endless Enigma Part One, Fugue and The Endless Enigma Part Two) illustrates this perfectly.
To deal with Carl Palmer first, in the early seventies he was finding ways of breaking up rhythms that had never been heard before. Nothing on Trilogy is quite as radical as his drumming on Tarkus but nonetheless, he was doing things here with sticks and skins that nobody else had tired.
In terms of rock music, Keith Emerson is an outstanding talent but that does not give full account of his real contribution. On the classical concert circuit, keyboard performance talent such as his is not unique but never before had this been combined with the kind of driven creative rock intensity of his contemporary guitar greats.
Greg Lake is often overlooked in comparison with the other two members of the band but that does not do him justice. As well as his distinctive voice, his bass guitar work is the perfect match for Emerson's keyboard playing. If you listen to the opening suite and try to imagine it with an ordinary, unimaginative bass line, you will appreciate that he adds his own dimension to the music.
Trilogy is a nice balance of the range of ELP's style. After "The Endless Enigma" comes "From the Beginning" a typical Greg Lake ballad. After that the band switches into exuberant fun mode for "The Sheriff" and an adaptation of Aaron Copeland's "Hoedown". The opening drums on the first of those two serves notice of what is to come.
Those tracks complete the opening side of the original vinyl release and, together with the title track which opened the second side, they form a powerful statement of the band's ability. The next track, "Living Sin" is the least convincing here and that is mainly because Greg Lake's voice does not really suit the style that he is trying to deliver. Finally, comes "Abaddon's Bolero" which is closely derived from Ravel's "Bolero" but which is curiously not credited as such on the sleeve notes. It's OK to listen to but, unlike most of ELP's covers, it does not really deliver much that was not in the original though Grek Lakes bass playing does stand out.
Trilogy is a good introduction to ELP though I think that Tarkus or their first album "Emerson, Lake and Palmer" server that purpose better. If you do like Trilogy, you will appreciate any of the albums that came before it and you might like to listen to music by Yes from the same time frame.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Loveit Perfection, 27 April 2012
By 
K. Buxton - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
Just thought I'd add some comments, this is my favourite ELP album and I bought it when it came out in 1972 and I still have the original vinyl album now, and it's in mint condition still.

I went to see ELP live at the Top Rank in Liverpool in 1972, it was my first ever concert and I was still at school, they played most of the Trilogy album and I was gobsmacked at these three superb musicians playing this fantastic classical/rock music, I also saw them again in 1974 at the Liverpool Empire Theatre.

Back to the trilogy album, from the first track `The Endless Enigma part 1' which starts off slow and builds up to a crescendo of great musicianship and timing, then into `Fugue' which has Keith Emerson playing light/heavy classical piano which leads into `The Endless Enigma part 2' from this we go to track 4 `From The Beginning' which is my favourite Greg Lake song, a nice balled with mainly acoustic guitar and ending with some electric guitar and keyboards, track 5 takes us to the `Sheriff' a track which is famous for its honky tonk wild west fast piano playing ending, apparently ELP always liked to put a gimmicky type song on each album and if you listen to other albums you'll find them.

Onto track 6 `Hoedown' written by Aaron Copland the first version I ever heard was ELP's It just blew me away, couldn't stop playing this track, just brilliant keyboard playing from Keith Emerson, I always felt sorry for Greg Lake & Carl Palmer as you knew that when Keith Emerson got going it would be 100mph non stop for Greg & Carl. Track 7 which is my favourite `Trilogy' this is just a fantastic song and I agree! Is in three sections, ballad/classical/rock, great piano, synthesiser, drumming & bass playing all put together with great timing, everything you want in a song is in this track.

Track 7 `Living Sin' always seems to get overlooked somehow, this is a great track Greg's strong vocals and I love the wonderful stop/start timing on this track and great drumming from Carl Palmer, finally track 8 `Abaddon's Bolero' an instrumental which starts off very quiet and slowly gets louder, it's one of those tracks that you think you've heard before, in a film or on the TV somewhere, that's how I felt when I first heard it, very catchy tune though.

To sum up, prog rock at its best, Trilogy is an album I'd recommend and still stands the test of time, well when you have one of the best keyboard players, bass players & drummers in the world this is what you produce.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best remastering of Trilogy yet - and with live bonus!, 4 Jun. 2001
By 
Bjrn Are Davidsen (Norway) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
This 2001 edition manages finally to give ELP the sound they deserve. Trilogy is of course as beautifull as ever, mixing quiet ballads with intense and intricate pieces, as well as great yearns like The Sheriff. Now its possible to listen to it as it always should have sounded - a Great Bargain! The live bonus Hoedown is a great final touch
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ELP at their best and thoroughly recommended, 17 Aug. 2011
By 
Stephen Reid "Stephen" (Basingstoke) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
I approached this album with a mixture of excitement and trepidation when it was first released. After `Tarkus', which I had found patchy and `Pictures at an Exhibition' which was a live tour de force but of proven material, I wondered whether ELP's third studio album of new material would make the grade. In fact, I was blown away by this album, which is quite brilliant.

If you want proof of Keith Emerson's virtuosity, go no further than the piano run down into the main body of `Trilogy', the title track. This is a rocker of a piece, in three sections. I believe this made it to their live performance but only for a short time - a shame, because to hear this live would have been something special.

"Hoedown" of course, has become an ELP live performance classic where Emerson seemingly tries to beat himself to the end of the track. "Abaddon's Bolero" is a haunting melody repeated over and over again in increasingly complex arrangements until the inevitable climax and end.

"From the Beginning" is a great slow ballad, a perfect vehicle for Greg Lake's strong voice.

And so on ... there really isn't a weak link on this album, and it was a portent of more great things to come with `Brain Salad Surgery'. This was ELP at their best and is thoroughly recommended.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "ELP's Best Album Gets The Deluxe Edition 5.1 Treatment From A New Mixmaster......", 5 May 2015
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This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
Yes I know fellow ELP fans, "the best" is subjective, but my opinion. Following in the footsteps of their first two studio albums, EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER and TARKUS, TRILOGY gets the Deluxe Edition makeover, with a new remaster of the original Greg Lake production and new stereo and 5.1 Surround Sound mixes from Jakko M. Jakszyk. For those unfamiliar with Mr. Jakszyk, he is a multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter, solo artist and record producer. He is also currently the lead singer and second guitarist in KING CRIMSON. He had also worked with former KC members in the 21st CENTURY SCHIZOID BAND. Jakko has had a long and varied career, check him out! Anyhoo, he was passed the reins from former mixmaster Steven Wilson of PORCUPINE TREE, another great musician with a busy and varied career who did the honors for the first two. Mr. Wilson has also remixed a slew of classic progressive-rock albums from the catalogs of KING CRIMSON, CARAVAN, JETHRO TULL, YES and XTC, to name a few......

EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER's first four studio albums are undisputed classics of the progressive-rock genre. It's hard to judge which is the best, if you even have to go that route. The first album (#18 US, #4 UK) was full of ideas bursting to get out of Keith Emerson's swirling overloaded auditory cortex and was their most "stripped-down" release. TARKUS (#9 US, #1 UK) ups the ante with the band's use of the best musical electronics of it's day. The side-long "Tarkus" suite is one of the most dazzling and tightly constructed progressive epics of it's era, but the rest of the album contained too-much filler, although filler some bands would kill for. BRAIN SALAD SURGERY (#11 US, #2 UK), their fourth, is probably their most well-known and feted release. Often near or at the top of most "best of prog-rock" lists, it had previously been available in a 5.1 mix on DVD-A and SACD, with mixed reviews. There's a 2014 Super Deluxe Edition with a 5.1 DVD but is prohibitively expensive for most. It was supposed to be included in the 2CD+DVD Deluxe Edition but was pulled at the last minute, leaving only a High-Res Stereo version. Needless to say, fans are not happy. While side-and-a half long epic "Karn Evil 9" is an enjoyable long-form composition, their stately remake of the old hymn "Jerusalem" leaves me cold, while "Benny The Bouncer" is one novelty too many. That leaves "Toccata," an impressive exercise in the then new technologies and probably the album's best cut, and "Still...You Turn Me On," the requisite Greg Lake ballad, not a bad little ditty, but it pales compared to "Lucky Man" (#48 US) and "From The Beginning" (#39 US)......

TRILOGY (#5 US, #2 UK) begins with "The Endless Enigma" a two-part composition with Emerson's "Fugue" sandwiched between. The (yes) enigmatic opening, with it's pulsing heartbeat bass (read the liner notes), eerie synths, punctuating bongos and stabs of free-form piano gives way to one of their most "classical" melodies and stately choruses. "Fugue" is basically Emerson rearranging the songs melodies into, yes, a fugue. Tubular bells and a clarion synth announces Part Two's rousing climax. The more I hear "From The Beginning" the more I like it. Pleasing open string guitar chords underpin one of Lake's best melodies. Emerson's synth may closely resemble his work on "Lucky Man" but at least he keeps it more concise. A not-to-different alternate take is included as a bonus. "The Sheriff" comes off like a second cousin to THE BEATLES' "Bungalow Bill" but is much less annoying. Keith gets his honky-tonk fixation on as a coda. The original Side Two leads off with the band's all too short arrangement of Aaron Copeland's "Hoedown." Emerson's majestic synths ride over Palmer's galloping drums and one of Lake's most powerful (and Squire-like) bass-lines. The 5.1 mix is awesome. The title-tune follows with Emerson setting the scene for it's main theme, about three-minutes in all hell breaks loose and the band goes double-time. Palmer doesn't get enough credit for his complex percussion foundation, reminiscent of John Bonham's work on LED ZEP's "Four Sticks." While probably the weakest track, "Living Sin" is redeemed by Keith's stunning Hammond work, which dominates the song and makes you forget the silly lyrics. The band couldn't wish for a better finale than Emerson's tour de force Ravel tribute "Abaddon's Bolero." The composition was made for 5.1 , revealing layers upon layers. The swirling synth fanfares and Palmer's gradually intensifying tom-toms bring the track, and the album, to a grand finish......

While you can argue over whether this is their best work, you cannot deny it's one of their finest, and IMHO their most consistent. While the original and new stereo mixes are fine, it's the 5.1 surround that takes the honors, I'll be looking forward to more of Jakko Jaksyzk's work in this area. This three-disc set is a great bargain and a must for ELP fans. Here's the complete and correct tune stack......

DISC ONE
CD1: Original TRILOGY
1. The Endless Enigma (Part One)
2. Fugue
3. The Endless Enigma (Part Two)
4. From The Beginning
5. The Sheriff
6. Hoedown
7. Trilogy
8. Living Sin
9. Abaddon's Bolero
DISC TWO
CD2: The New Stereo TRILOGY
1. From The Beginning [Alternate Version]
New Stereo Mixes:
2. The Endless Enigma (Part One)
3. Fugue
4. The Endless Enigma (Part Two)
5. From The Beginning
6. The Sheriff
7. Hoedown
8. Trilogy
9. Living Sin
10. Abaddon's Bolero
DISC THREE
DVD-A: 5.1 TRILOGY
Original Stereo Mixes presented in both MLP Lossless & LPCM, both at 24-bit 96kHz:
1. The Endless Enigma (Part One)
2. Fugue
3. The Endless Enigma (Part Two)
4. From The Beginning
5. The Sheriff
6. Hoedown
7. Trilogy
8. Living Sin
9. Abaddon's Bolero
New stereo mixes presented in MLP Lossless 5.1 & Stereo at 24 bit 96kHz, and
DTS 96/24 5.1 & Dolby Digital 5.1 (48kHz,) and
LPCM Stereo at 24-bit 96kHz
10. The Endless Enigma (Part One)
11. Fugue
12. The Endless Enigma (Part Two)
13. From The Beginning
14. The Sheriff
15. Hoedown
16. Trilogy
17. Living Sin
18. Abaddon's Bolero
19. From The Beginning (Alternate Version)

Produced by Greg Lake
Arranged by Emerson, Lake & Palmer
Lyrics by Greg Lake
Recorded at Advision
Production Engineer: Eddie Offord
New Stereo and 5.1 mixes by Jakko M. Jakszyk
Mixed at Selesia Sound, Hertfordshire, UK
Thanks to Andy Tillison
Cover design and photography by Hipgnosis

KEITH EMERSON: Hammond Organ C3, Steinway Piano, Zourkra Moog Synthesizer III C, Mini Moog Model D
GREG LAKE: Vocals, Bass, Electric & Acoustic Guitars
CARL PALMER: Drums & Percussion
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ABSOLUTELY FANTASTIC ALBUM (pity about the reissue), 3 April 2011
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
First off, the reviewer below (J Bruce) gives this 1 star and has pretty much gone through all ELP albums giving them 1 star and a torrent of abuse, I doubt he listens to ELP at all and though everyone is entitled to an opinion these albums should only be reviewed by people who own them.
Trilogy is probably ELP's most accessible album without losing their style as they did with Love Beach (1978). I came to this album first in 1989, unfortunatly I'm too young to have been there in the bands heyday, and instantly fell in love with it. I truely beleive it stills holds up very well today.
These recent CD reissues , although good to keep the music alive, have not added any extra bonus tracks to those on the 2001 reissues. It would've been nice to have added some studio rehearsals or unreleased tracks. Still it is a fine, fine album
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A whole variety show, 30 Jan. 2004
By 
Andy Millward (Tiptree, Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Trilogy (Audio CD)
My favourite ELP album, and an amazingly varied showcase for the talents of three fine musicians. I can't improve on John O'Connor's analysis of the material, though it's worth saying that these tracks stand the test of time remarkably well:
Endless Enigma still sounds edgy and years ahead of its time; From the Beginning and the Sheriff are still great singalong numbers; and I defy anyone to listen to Hoedown without tapping their feet; and rarely has anyone written a more beautiful song than the first section of Trilogy - a love ending but a melody to last forever, a lyrical entwining of Emerson's piano melody and Greg Lake's sensitive vocal interpretation.
This is class!
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Trilogy by Emerson, Lake & Palmer (Audio CD - 2011)
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