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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Charming
Charming is not the word I would have expected to use to describe a book, especially since my taste veers towards thrillers and sci-fi. But this is a charming and very enjoyable book, bought for me by my daughter which is lucky because I would never have picked this up!

Set in the turbulent time of Laos in the late 70s it features an elderly coroner who has an...
Published on 6 Jun 2010 by Nick Brett

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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 33 Teeth by Colin Cotterill
This series of detective stories set in 1970s Laos bring a little-known country and period vividly to life. I don't understand, however, why some reviewers have described them as 'comic': the author is well aware of the awful tragedies which Laotians endured at this time.
Published on 27 Jun 2009 by Tacey


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Charming, 6 Jun 2010
By 
Nick Brett (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
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Charming is not the word I would have expected to use to describe a book, especially since my taste veers towards thrillers and sci-fi. But this is a charming and very enjoyable book, bought for me by my daughter which is lucky because I would never have picked this up!

Set in the turbulent time of Laos in the late 70s it features an elderly coroner who has an ability to sense spirits. But this is not a fantasy novel although it does gently touch on the mystical. It is more of a gentle mystery by which our hero Dr Siri Paiboun investigates what is causing the death of the savaged bodies that are turning up at his morgue.

Laos was a subject to a Communist takeover in about 1975 and re-invented itself as Lao People's Democratic Republic, these were difficult and violent times and an odd scenario for a whimsical mystery, but it does work by concentrating on characterisation (supported by some very witty dialogue) and giving a gentle view of how the population got around the new regime. But this is not a novel about oppression, it is a mystery set within an unusual environment. And actually the mystery is not all that important, it merely provides the framework for our characters to interact and for us readers to enjoy their relaxed and witty view on life.

I'm told that this would appeal to those who have enjoyed Alexander McCall-Smith's Botswanan books which I have not read, but might well check out on the basis of this one. Very enjoyable.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dr Siri counts his teeth and Nurse Dtui counts her good luck., 28 Feb 2008
This review is from: Thirty-Three Teeth (Hardcover)
For everyone who read The Coroner's Lunch and thought it a faboulous book, Thirty-Three Teeth won't dissapoint.
Dr Siri is still the coroner and is now more interested in his developing psychic ability to see and understand the dead, and to understand why.
He also has to go to Luang Prabang which is where the Laos Royal Palace is situated to identify some bodies, meet for the first time his wifes family and the former King.
Meanwhile in Vientane a Malay Black Bear is on the loose in the city, women are being mauled to death each night of the full moon and Nurse Dtui is on the case. But without Dr Siris' talking dead to help her she's in trouble.
As always the joy of Colin Cotterills' books are that the characters are so wonderfully believable, the situations vere between being as mundane as riding a bicycle to extraudinary like sealed boxes that kill. Without doubt the banter between all the characters set these books apart and will kep me hoping Mr Cotterill carrys on writing them.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Mystical Sequel Keeps Up The Good Work, 18 Oct 2008
By 
Quicksilver (UK) - See all my reviews
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'Thirty Three Teeth' is the sequel to 'The Coroner's Lunch' The Coroner's Lunch and carries on in pretty much the same vein; very easy to read, with delightfully languid prose, that glides along sleepily, much like life in Laos. Everybody who has been to the country falls in love with it and Cotterill is clearly smitten.

This book wasn't quite as good as the first; the crime solving took something of a back seat and there seemed to be less humour. Instead of an elaborate plot, the mysteries in 'Thrity Three Teeth' were simple affairs, with little or no real solving required.

Instead we were offered an insight into a country after a revolution; the bewilderment of its population and the tenacity to which they hold onto their old ways. For me there was a little too much of the "spiritual" side of things. The idea of Laos's spirit world is touched upon in the first novel, but here I felt Cotterill rather over-egged his pudding.

Comparisons with 'The No1 Ladies's Detective Agency' books are more appropriate for this book, than for the first instalment (I stated in my review of 'TCL' that they weren't all that alike). Like McCall Smith, Cotterill is primarily offering his reader a view of life in a sleepy backwater, where characters take precedence over plot.

Thirty Three Teeth is delightfully charming and for anybody who has been to Laos, an essential read. For those who haven't, there is still much to enjoy and if you haven't already started I can heartily recommend that you explore the unusual world of Dr Siri.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unusual setting for a mystery: Laos, 4 Jan 2011
By 
L. C. Rees (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is the second in the series that begins with The Coroner's Lunch. It is set in 1970's Laos after the communist takeover, and is gripping yet very funny. After 20 years in the jungle patching up his comrades, Dr Siri does not want to be the coroner of Laos, but he is the only doctor who has not fled the country. I would highly recommend the whole series! When else have I read a mystery set in southeast Asia?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, 2 Aug 2009
By 
JJ (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This is the second book in the Dr Siri series and I am completely hooked.
Dr Siri chief, and only, coroner in Laos has discovered he has hidden powers. For a start he makes a very good detective and he is also 'aided' by his ability to see the departed (even if he is not always completely sure why they appear). On top of that (without giving too much away) he could, once, long ago, have been someone else.
The plot is meandering yet gripping and there is a lot of gentle humour. One of the things I really like is the interaction between Dr Siri and his friends - they speak just the silly inconsequential way friends talk, taking a humourous poke at each other but ready to help when they can.
The picture of life in Laos under the communist regime is well set out with its exasperations and yet great and hopeful expectations.
I really enjoy this series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great fun - crime with spirit!, 8 Jun 2009
This second episode involving Dr Sirius, chief coroner of Laos set in 1976, is just as entertaining as the first (The Coroner's Lunch). Easily mixing information about Laos in this period with intelligent crime interest and Laos' superstitions and beliefs this makes for an excellent read. Many favouyrable comparisons with Alexander McCall Smith and the Botswana novels, this provides a similar mixture. I have a queue of people waiting to raed it after I pased on the first one!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hooked on Dr Siri, 17 April 2014
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This review is from: Thirty-Three Teeth: A Dr Siri Murder Mystery (Kindle Edition)
This is the second of the Dr Siri books that I have read. Appropriately I read the first one when visiting Laos, and I was already familiar with Vientiane and a little of the country's history. The books are available there in paperback and profits go to a charitable organisation which helps to supply schools with necessary materials. When I got back home (in Thailand) I immediately looked for more in the series on Kindle. From what I could see, there are only a couple from a series of at least six, and they are not chronologically sequential. I hope that Kindle can address that. The characters are so beautifully created, and they weave whimsically through crimes, real and imagined, the unique political atmosphere of the country as well as flirting with the supernatural. Absolutely delightful. I wonder whether Kindle contributes in any way to the charity.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Loas in 1977, 23 Mar 2014
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This review is from: Thirty-Three Teeth: A Dr Siri Murder Mystery (Kindle Edition)
It engages rights from the start, especially if you have read the first in the series 'The Coroner's Lunch'. It offers insight into Loas society which is a complete mystery to me. And I enjoyed the characters of Dr Siri and his team and the other people who pop up in both books..
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for all lovers of crime fiction, Laos and mysteries!, 19 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Thirty-Three Teeth: A Dr Siri Murder Mystery (Kindle Edition)
Well written, funny and interesting jaunt through Laos in the 1970's. Colin Cotterill's stories are captivating and the character of Dr. Siri is loveable and fun. A great series of books so far, and I'm really enjoying the development of the other character's in this series of books, particularly Dtui in this instalment.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Very Enjoyable Read, 25 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Thirty-Three Teeth: A Dr Siri Murder Mystery (Kindle Edition)
I thoroughly enjoyed this book which is the second in the Dr Siri series. It contains some very interesting and unique approaches to this genre of fiction including exotic locations, interesting cultures and religions along with the traditional who dun it that everyone expects.
Highly recommended.
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