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28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tyrone Power the movie star shines here. For Tyrone Power the actor, see Nightmare Alley
Tyrone Power was too earnest and straight forward to be a great actor, but he had what it takes to be a great movie star. The earnestness of his acting made him likable, even in those rare occasions when he played a heel. He was startlingly handsome as a young man. Even as his looks matured after WWII, he maintained his status as a romantic leading man up to his death of...
Published on 13 Jun 2007 by C. O. DeRiemer

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic tales
Tyrone Power? The wronged Saxon? With a funny haircut?
This is a classic film, the young Tyrone Power, along with trusty side-kick Jack Hawkins, set off for China in search of gunpowder, gold and girls.
Unfortunately there's too much chat and not enough swash-buckling, potentially this could have been a great action adventure, and quite convincing (despite Orson...
Published on 23 Aug 2008 by Harry Nicholas


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic tales, 23 Aug 2008
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Tyrone Power? The wronged Saxon? With a funny haircut?
This is a classic film, the young Tyrone Power, along with trusty side-kick Jack Hawkins, set off for China in search of gunpowder, gold and girls.
Unfortunately there's too much chat and not enough swash-buckling, potentially this could have been a great action adventure, and quite convincing (despite Orson Welles as Ghengis Khan); imagine returning to England having conquered China, carrying pots of jewels, gunpowder and all the wonders of the Orient?
But sadly Hawkins gets killed in one of the few action sequences, all the battles are in the distance or talked about rather than fought.
Well worth a look though, Cécile Aubry is a magical (if idiotic) Maryam, Jack Hawkins the hopeless romantic.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars And the actual package contents is ..., 24 Oct 2011
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Beware: this is not the "Tyrone Power Swashbuckler Box Set" presumed in other review but the "Tyrone Power Box Set."

The actual contents is
- A Yank in the RAF (1941, war adventure, drama)
- The Mark of Zorro (1940, action adventure)
- The Razor's Edge (1946, drama, very good if you like the genre)
- In Old Chicago (1937, drama, musical)
- Second Fiddle (1939, comedy, musical)

Mark of Zorro is provided with English, Spanish, German and Italian tracks. The other films have only an English track.

All of them are region 2, PAL, B&W, and contain [at least] English subtitles. Image cleanliness seems average (no remastering or cleansing here).

Not a bad set but far from what I expected. In any case, I find it worthy of the 10+ pounds invested. 2 Pounds a film is a bargain.

The 3-star review goes to the lack of information and not to the box set itself or its price.
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28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tyrone Power the movie star shines here. For Tyrone Power the actor, see Nightmare Alley, 13 Jun 2007
By 
C. O. DeRiemer (San Antonio, Texas, USA) - See all my reviews
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Tyrone Power was too earnest and straight forward to be a great actor, but he had what it takes to be a great movie star. The earnestness of his acting made him likable, even in those rare occasions when he played a heel. He was startlingly handsome as a young man. Even as his looks matured after WWII, he maintained his status as a romantic leading man up to his death of a heart attack when he was 49. As a heel, a hero or as a period swashbuckler, Power had that undefinable quality that made people want to buy tickets to his movies. These five swashbucklers, as variable in quality and corniness as they are, give a fine picture of Tyrone Power, movie star. He had to fight to be taken seriously as an actor, so I hope everyone who buys this set will also take a look at Power in Nightmare Alley (1947). The characters he plays in this set -- Juan Gallardo, Benjamin Blake, Pedro de Vargas, Andrea Orsini, Walter of Gurnie -- you'll probably forget. You'll remember Power as Stanton Carlisle.

Blood and Sand (1941) -- Blood and Sand is not a swashbuckler, but an allegory of a man's pride, lust and ambition, played out in the bullring, about a man who is redeemed by the love of a good woman and a death ennobled by regret. In other words, the movie is a Hollywood weeper. Still, it shows what can be accomplished when professionals take hold of a teary melodrama and give it color, sleekness, sex and, at 27, an extraordinarily handsome leading man in Tyrone Power. Rita Hayworth, as the femme fatale, is almost as pretty.

Son of Fury (1942) -- If Son of Fury were the title of a paperback novel, we'd expect a bodice-ripping, heavy-breathing Regency romance. What we have is a highly professional Darryl F. Zanuck adventure of surprising innocence and charm. Everything about the movie, from the actors to the script to the cinematography, features such a high level of craftsmanship that the few corny moments pass quickly. The story, even with a stolen inheritance, a wicked uncle and a South Seas cutie, is told with such professional attention to naivety that we cheer for Ben, hiss his uncle, and even find the unlikely conclusion satisfying.

Captain from Castile (1947) - If Captain from Castile is remembered much today it probably is because of one of the most rousing marches a Hollywood composer ever wrote. The "Conquest" theme is heard only three times, and the first two are brief but effective scene setters. We have to wait until the movie is almost over and Hernan Cortez is setting out on his march to the Aztec capital of Tenochititlan for the full treatment. The music, by Alfred Newman, embraces the moment, with hundreds of soldiers, the priests, the natives, the hangers-on spreading out before us, the horizon lightening and a single volcano smoking in the distance. The theme is inspiring, martial, emotional, uplifting and memorable. It's enough to make most movie goers want to sign up and most historians queasy. After all, in less than a generation a civilization of between 2 million and 6 million people was obliterated.

Prince of Foxes (1949) -- If passionate love, convivial betrayals and loyalty one can change as quickly as one's shirt intrigues you, you'll most likely enjoy Prince of Foxes. If nothing else, you'll learn a great party trick that involves two eyeballs and two thumbs. Prince of Foxes, in my view, is one of the best of the Tyrone Power adventure films. It stands out in part because we find ourselves operating in the lusty, double-dealing world of Cesare Borgia. And while Orson Welles, who plays Borgia, can't resist slicing the ham with gusto, it must be admitted that he brings a lot of joie de vivre to villainy.

The Black Rose (1950) -- And what's a black rose? We're told it is the name given to the clove, the most precious of spices. In this case, the clove is Maryam, played by Cecile Aubry. She was a small French actress who looks no older than 14. She has a small mouth which is filled with tiny teeth and a plump tongue, and she occasionally jumps about to express enthusiasm. If Vera-Ellen and Charlie McCarthy had ever had a child, it would look a lot like Cecile Aubry. The movie, The Black Rose, is no stinker, but the one insuperable drawback is its disjointed nature. We move from Norman England 200 years after William the Conqueror, to the middle-east and then on to a Mongol army moving and battling its way toward China, then to the imperial court of China itself, and finally back to England. It seems to me to be one of Power's weakest romantic-adventure films.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More buckle than swash, 10 Mar 2012
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Black Rose [DVD] (DVD)
Sometimes love of a genre can make you overlook some films' problems that seem overwhelming to unbiased observers, so it's worth noting my bias for epic adventures when I say that The Black Rose is still pretty dreadful by anyone's standards. A big-budget misfire with a distinct lack of swash to its buckle and a miscast Tyrone Power playing a part he's a good twenty years too old to get away with, there's a promising enough plot - Power's disinherited Saxon `youth' leaves England rather than serve a Norman king to find his fortune in the Far East, where he's drawn into Kublai Khan's plans to conquer China - but it's quickly smothered. Desperately uninteresting characters, no battles, virtually no action but a lot of sulking and a surfeit of silly names - the hero is called Walter of Gurney and that's just for starters - ensure that it's the kind of film your body actively rebels against while watching, urging you to do something more useful like going to sleep instead.

A decent supporting cast of British movie regulars (James Robertson Justice, Finlay Currie, Herbert Lom) try their best, though some, like Michael Rennie, barely hide their boredom at it all. Despite getting off to a truly terrible start, Jack Hawkins' sidekick at least improves as the film goes on, which is more than can be said for leading lady Cecile Aubrey, who looks like the kind of annoyingly precious schoolgirl that makes vasectomy seem like a good idea. The less said about a horrendously badly dubbed Alfonso Bedoya the better.

It's not a total loss - Orson Welles' genial turn as Kublai Khan's ruthless general Bayan `of the Hundred Eyes' sees to that even though he has nothing to do but act genial and bemused by his English recruits. If anything, the presence of the director of Citizen Kane in the cast only acts to remind you of how shoddily made the film is. Some of the editing is surprisingly crude and awkward, with many shots matching so badly you could almost be forgiven for thinking they were shot for different films, and it's hard to tell whether the surprisingly dreary Technicolor photography in the English scenes is by design or simply down to color fading. Even Richard Addinsell can't summon up any enthusiasm in his score. It's hard not to agree when Power says "I wish I had something more to tell you. It all ought to add up to something." Dire stuff.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More buckle than swash, 1 Nov 2008
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Sometimes love of a genre can make you overlook some films' problems that seem overwhelming to unbiased observers, so it's worth noting my bias for epic adventures when I say that The Black Rose is still pretty dreadful by anyone's standards. A big-budget misfire with a distinct lack of swash to its buckle and a miscast Tyrone Power playing a part he's a good twenty years too old to get away with, there's a promising enough plot - Power's disinherited Saxon `youth' leaves England rather than serve a Norman king to find his fortune in the Far East, where he's drawn into Kublai Khan's plans to conquer China - but it's quickly smothered. Desperately uninteresting characters, no battles, virtually no action but a lot of sulking and a surfeit of silly names - the hero is called Walter of Gurney and that's just for starters - ensure that it's the kind of film your body actively rebels against while watching, urging you to do something more useful like going to sleep instead.

A decent supporting cast of British movie regulars (James Robertson Justice, Finlay Currie, Herbert Lom) try their best, though some, like Michael Rennie, barely hide their boredom at it all. Despite getting off to a truly terrible start, Jack Hawkins' sidekick at least improves as the film goes on, which is more than can be said for leading lady Cecile Aubrey, who looks like the kind of annoyingly precious schoolgirl that makes vasectomy seem like a good idea. The less said about a horrendously badly dubbed Alfonso Bedoya the better.

It's not a total loss - Orson Welles' genial turn as Kublai Khan's ruthless general Bayan `of the Hundred Eyes' sees to that even though he has nothing to do but act genial and bemused by his English recruits. If anything, the presence of the director of Citizen Kane in the cast only acts to remind you of how shoddily made the film is. Some of the editing is surprisingly crude and awkward, with many shots matching so badly you could almost be forgiven for thinking they were shot for different films, and it's hard to tell whether the surprisingly dreary Technicolor photography in the English scenes is by design or simply down to color fading. Even Richard Addinsell can't summon up any enthusiasm in his score. It's hard not to agree when Power says "I wish I had something more to tell you. It all ought to add up to something." Dire stuff.

Extras on the Region 1 NTSC DVD include a featurette reuniting Power's children, stills galleries and trailer, though the Region 2 PAL DVD is extras-free.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent flm, 11 May 2014
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This review is from: The Black Rose [DVD] (DVD)
Really enjoyed this film, gripped me to the end and had a happy ending, it is a great film and i highly recommend it
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not Tyrone's best., 29 Nov 2013
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This review is from: The Black Rose [DVD] (DVD)
Odd sort of film, think the leading lady very much miscast. Poor Tyrone looked as if he was wooing a girl young enough to be his daughter.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Medievel Kinights in China Romp, 2 Oct 2008
Great Movie (except for 25 mins middle section where the heroes are trying to escape a prison) but the girl is beautiful, Orson Welles the Muslim villain, o.t.t., Tyrone Powers in hero mode and Jack Hawkins the wiser older guy the girl still thinks is a bit cute. Oh, Mother !
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars tyrone power box sets, 3 Nov 2011
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thank you for sending the dvds to me my husband love them so much he watch them must of the time sorry i not lookmat my review but my dad has being in hospital
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars classic holly wood, 29 April 2011
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bought this cos i thought the blood and sand movie was in it, tyrone power is don diago (zorro) but i like antonio banderas as well
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