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3.4 out of 5 stars13
3.4 out of 5 stars
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on 26 June 2005
Winner Takes All is a fast, enjoyable read, that feels like an episode from the wonderful new series. Jacqueline Rayner has done a great job of capturing Rose and the Doctor, as well as Mickey and Jackie, which is amazing when you consider she must have written it months before a single episode aired.
The story is straight forward enough; a video game, Death to Mantodeans has become the rage of Rose's old neighborhood. Alas, this game isn't just harmless fun, but a horrfying life and death struggle with insectoid aliens, who have a taste for human flesh, and some very nasty, king-size porcupines. Not to worry though, the Doctor will soon sort it out.
I've read two of the novels based on the new series, The Clockwise Man and Winner Takes All, and even though I think The Clockwise Man is the better, more satisfying story, this one is still a lot of fun. These books are just the thing to hold me over until the Christmas Special. More please, and bring on the Captain Jack stories!
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on 15 April 2013
Rose and the Doctor return to present-day Earth, and become intrigued by the latest craze - the video game, Death to Mantodeans. Is it as harmless as it seems? And why are so many local people going on holiday and never returning? Meanwhile, on another world, an alien war is raging. The Quevvils need to find a new means of attacking the ruthless Mantodeans.

Searching the galaxy for cunning, warlike but gullible allies, they find the ideal soldiers on Earth. Will Rose be able to save her family and friends from the alien threat? And can the Doctor play the game to the end and win?

Featuring the Ninth Doctor and Rose as played by Christopher Eccleston and Billie Piper in the hit science fiction series from BBC Television
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on 24 June 2007
I mean it. Shes brilliant. She is the ONLY (only!) writer of Doctor Who books that I think has properly captured the spirits of the Doctor and Rose. All of her books have a great storyline and her books are the only Dr Who ones that I have managed to read to the end. I literally couldnt put it down. The Stone Rose was exactly the same, even if the Doctor was different she brought his soul onto paper brilliantly. I can't wait till I get the Last Dodo!!!!!

Ellen
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on 2 February 2009
A straight and simple plot line, a collection of recognisable characters and quite straightforward new ones make it an enjoyable and fast moving book. Good cliffhangers.
There were several details not described - such as why the two aliens were at war in the first place, but they aren't important to the story so they aren't missed until you look back afterwards.
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on 27 October 2013
I found this quite a good story. Not the best doctor who novel i have ever read but good. The one thing i didn't like was the Quevvils (aliens) who were stealing people. I thought they could of thought of a better monster than a porcupine.
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on 2 September 2005
I think (like I said in the title) that this is a really good piece of writing! Jacqueline Rayner writes really well, keeping the Doctor and Rose completely in character almost all the time. It has an interesting plot line, although the story is again, based on Earth. It also brings Mickey and Jackie back into the story and the slight bickering between Mickey and the Doctor helps to bring more humour into the story.
There is a part that some people might find slightly confusing. One of the main characters in this particular story is a boy called Robert. To help himself in tricky situations, he likes to imagine that he's somewhere else, and someone else. He pretends that he's a hero of a story or something like that to help him forget his own life. I hope I've made that clear, but I rather liked that because it shows the range of different reactions people have when they're facing something frightening.
All in all, a great read, worth buying!
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on 23 June 2005
I really enjoyed reading this book; it was very much Doctor Who. Like the new tv series, it had an emotional centre which gave it depth. On the other hand, there were places, particularly towards the beginning, where I was a bit doubtful about characterisation, although that got better as the book progressed. The plot, although fun, is certainly not original; among other things, there's a Terry Pratchett novel along the same lines (although I personally think this was better than that).
On the whole this was a good read, and I do recommend it; it may not be one of the best Doctor Who books, but it is very enjoyable.
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on 19 August 2005
Of all the 3 novels published to tie in with the new television series of Doctor Who, Winner Takes All best captures the spirit of the series. The regulars (including the wonderful Jackie and Mickey) are captured brilliantly and as you're reading you'll be able to hear the actors voices saying the lines in your head. The plot is tremendous fun and feels like one of the more light-hearted episodes of the new series (a bit like Aliens Of London or Rose).
All in all, this book will delight new fans and old and is a must-purchase for anyone wanting to spend more company with the Doctor and Rose.
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on 16 May 2005
If you like the new series, then you will enjoy this novel.
The interplay of the Ninth Doctor and Rose is well-captured, as are the soap opera elements of Rose's domestic life.
And although the plot is somewhat derivative (not only of previous Who stories, but also a certain Terry Pratchett novel!), Jacqueline Rayner has given the various strands a through mix. Resulting in a novel that rattles along at such a pace, that you do not mind.
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A doctor who novel featuring the ninth doctor and his companion rose. Two hundred and fifty pages [approx] long, the time travellers pop back to rose's home to visit her mother, and find that a company are giving out free video games all over the area. But there's more to these games than meets the eye, and those who are good at them end up in the clutches of aliens who need their services. can the doctor save the day and free these people?

One of the very first novels in this range, and written at a time before much of the ninth doctor had been seen on screen. reading it two years later I can see now that the writer does a very good job of characterising him and all the regular cast members who show up. And the setting of a typical london neighbourhood is well drawn, along with one very good supporting character, an insecure teenage boy who is molly coddled by his mother.

However the plot of this one does feel rather slight, and frankly a bit overstretched at times. It's a decent enough read, but it's nothing special, and there are stronger novels in the range
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