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142 of 150 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for a table-top hob, but limited for serious cooking.
Well made, compact, and works from a 13A plug with a maximum of two kilowatts from the mains. And it is an induction hob, so only the pot gets hot, and we already had the right pots for an induction hob. Induction means no smells or fumes or condensation and a cool hob, electric means portable and clean.

As shown in the Az blurb, it has ten power settings and...
Published on 23 Feb. 2011 by R. F. Stevens

versus
39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars lacks control.
for the price it's unbeatable. but it's way too powerful and lacks granularity in the lower power settings. 3, 2 and 1 are only weak because they pulse the heat (turns on and off at regular intervals) and 10 just burns stuff. Great for making steaks if using with a cast iron grill-pan, induction adapters tend to fail because the cooker shuts off before the adaptor gets...
Published on 31 Jan. 2012 by Raul


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142 of 150 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for a table-top hob, but limited for serious cooking., 23 Feb. 2011
By 
R. F. Stevens "richard23491" (Ickenham UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
Well made, compact, and works from a 13A plug with a maximum of two kilowatts from the mains. And it is an induction hob, so only the pot gets hot, and we already had the right pots for an induction hob. Induction means no smells or fumes or condensation and a cool hob, electric means portable and clean.

As shown in the Az blurb, it has ten power settings and a range of temperature settings and can operate as either power-input controlled or as pot-temperature controlled. The mode selection button also allows a count-down timer that can be applied to either mode - a bit confusing, but one gets used to it.

Power mode. Setting 1 is not quite a simmer, setting 2 is a gentle simmer, setting 3 is a slow boil, and then it really gets going, with not much apparent difference in the higher settings. I would have liked more subtlety in the power settings, like with my De Dietrich 60cm Induction Hob DTi704V. Being extremely quick to the boil, it feels more than the two kilowatts, but that might just be because the controls are rather coarse in their application.

Temperature mode. Lowest is 60°C and it goes up in approximately 20°C steps to 240°C. Except it is totally inaccurate at the lower temperatures, persistently boiling four pints of water furiously on the 60°C setting, long after I would have expected it to have sensed the temperature of the previously boiled pot. I can see the application if one is using a cooking oil at high temperature, in a big full pot that is slow to respond, but not otherwise. Poor.

Timer mode. It works and is accurate, and counts down to turn off the hob. But there is only the one display, so it is not immediately obvious that the cooking mode one left to set the timer is the one that is still in operation. But we quickly got used to it. OK, could be better.

Cooking something delicate like a cheese sauce or a slowly simmered soup might be problematic because of the lack of low-power subtlety. I keep thinking it is going to burn on, even though all the pots have thick bases. The confidence to be able to leave it alone for a few minutes is not there.

So why use the Andrew James? My kitchen is in pieces right now, at the tender mercies of a builder, and will be so for another few weeks, and to continue eating we needed a hob that could run on a 13Amp plug. And buying this hob is much cheaper than living on takeaways. The Andrew James is fine for cooking in the conservatory, and we have done several meals with it, but after having been spoiled by using a proper full-sized induction hob with much more subtle control I could not recommend the Andrew James as a long-term prime hob.

One oddity struck me, if one looks at the base of a wide pan of water just about to boil the pattern of new bubbles indicates that the centre of heat is not in the centre of the ring, but slightly to the left, even though the induction winding is centred on the printed graphic. As an engineer I find this slightly puzzling, there was no other metal near it.

We can live with the fiddly mode selection, but the lack of subtle control is why it loses a star. After all, ten steps vs fifteen steps? It is only a simple software tweak, and for the sake of that "ha'p'orth of tar"...
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79 of 85 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Andrew James Electric Induction Hob, 30 Nov. 2010
By 
This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
As far as I can see, this cooker is exactly the same as the Judge. Really fast!!! cooking, certainly cannot leave unattended it's so fast. Only had this cooker for a week, as we've had to disconnect our gas cooker due to kitchen refit in January and us giving our existing cooker away to someone we know in time for Christmas. Without doubt, it's a learning curve and we've not used the timer function yet, so time will tell. Anyway, really pleased with this so far, it's really speeded up our cooking and I think it behaves better than the gas cooker, as cools instantly when turned down. Another thing, really good value in comparison to all the other inductions on this site, even with the postage added on.
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars my best friend, 7 Feb. 2011
This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
It took a while to get the hang of my Induction hob and for a day or so I thought I,d made a mistake buying it, but once I got used to it,its very easy to use and I wouldn't part with it now.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Positive feedback, 4 Aug. 2011
This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
I bought this as a trial of the technology. I'm now a convert! The heat up time is very fast indeed and I liked the controlability. Only reason not for 5 stars is the low heat setting is too high; however I'm not finding this a big issue. The noise reported in some reviews didn't bother me - kitchen already noisy I guess, but as there is a cooling fan you just need to be aware of that. Not an issue for me. VG product and does exactly what I wanted it to do.
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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars lacks control., 31 Jan. 2012
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This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
for the price it's unbeatable. but it's way too powerful and lacks granularity in the lower power settings. 3, 2 and 1 are only weak because they pulse the heat (turns on and off at regular intervals) and 10 just burns stuff. Great for making steaks if using with a cast iron grill-pan, induction adapters tend to fail because the cooker shuts off before the adaptor gets to high temperatures, so it can only be used for simmering.
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67 of 73 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tremendous value - at first, 18 May 2012
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This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
Being fed up with bad tasting water from a succession of currently available electric kettles, we decided to go for a stove-top instead. We knew that on our old ceramic hob with 1.8kw plates a double-mugfull (about 0.6 litres) would take at least 5 minutes or more to reach a proper boil, compared with 3 minutes on an electric 2.8kw kettle.

An single Induction Hob seemed the sensible way to go and we soon chose this Andrew James one after reading all the reviews here. We also bought (elsewhere) a Stellar 1.7 litre stainless steel kettle with induction suitable base (we chose a spouted one but in retrospect a whistler might have been better as I find the 'tea-essential boiling moment' difficult to detect).

Anyway, absolutely brilliant, problem solved. Takes just 2 minutes to boil more than enough for 2 mugs on setting 10, and provides wonderful tasting tea. Have yet to experiment with anything else. It was more a question of convenience really than time or economics of course, but we are really pleased with this hob.

We agree with all the good things already said in these reviews and:

1. We do not think the fan is unacceptably noisy at all
2. Both the 'beeps' and the red coloured display are pretty discreet and, we feel, not annoying.
3. The instruction book is far from helpful, even confusing, but a little experience in use soon overcomes this.
4. It arrived very quickly with no problems.
5. For the money first impressions are excellent in every respect.

After 5 brilliant months it suddenly just gave up on us, defaulting to 'off' ('L') no matter what we did and no response to my suggestion to 'Return' it. Not happy. Now I know why this item is so astonishingly cheap to buy. Today we have replaced it with a different make via another retailer at a lot more money but with a reliable 2 year warranty (and touch controls).
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59 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt, 6 Jan. 2011
This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
We bought two of these units as replacements for our old induction hobs, now given to our daughter. So far, we have found them very simple to use and extremely reliable and at a fraction of the cost of the old ones. We're probably stating the obvious but this type of hob works only with stainless steel cookware (use a magnet to check the base of your pans).
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51 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Value for money, 10 Aug. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
PREFACE
Having got to the end of this review I realized it was as much of a guide to using an Induction Hob as a review but I decided to leave it as it was because I hope that some new users will find it more useful in this form.
For those familiar with induction hobs I would buy this one again subject to my comments on temperature control which may be better on units other than this and the Lidl unit I previously bought.

DELIVERY
The delivery charge seems expensive but may be justified. I bought two to reduce the delivery cost per unit. The units arrived on time and well packaged. Set up is as easy as finding a level surface plugging it in and switching on with a suitable pot in place (see POTS).

POTS
A magnet must be attracted to the base of the pot. Induction hobs work by inducing heat in the magnetic material in the pot. Stainless steel pots are not necessarily magnetic.
There is an induction symbol on some pots but most pots with a magnetic base will be suitable for an induction hob provided the base attracts a magnate, larger than 12cm and smaller than 22 cm. There is a little tolerance so maybe 10cm to 24cm would be OK.
Pots that a magnetic will not stick to will not work unless you put a special disc under them.
The disc seems a bit fiddly and overpriced so new pots are probably a better option.
Pots that have a solid base of reasonable thickness (4mm) are most versatile (see POWER and SIMMERING).

PUSH BUTTON VERSES TOUCH CONTROLS
I had originally bought an induction hob from a different manufacturer that used touch sensitive controls under one sheet of ceramic. The good point of this was that it was very easy to keep clean the bad point was that occasionally I would accidentally change a setting or turn it off when rubbing away spillage. On balance I think I prefer the buttons on the Andrew James version.
The use of a function button to rotate through the functions has disadvantages over simple selecting the function with a single button press but it saves having an extra two buttons on the control panel. I think that the extra buttons may have been better but what is there is workable.

BUILD QUALITY
The ceramic part where the pot is placed and the plastic parts of the control panel seem durable and of reasonable quality.

NOISE
There is some fan noise but this is totally drowned out by my extractor fan as it is nothing like as loud. I don't think the noise of the unit should cause anyone using a kitchen problems.

TIMER
The timer is selected by pressing the function button till the led next to the word timer is illuminated. The timer allows you to turn the unit off after a specific amount of time has elapsed, it increments in 5 minutes on the way up and 1 minute intervals on the way down, it has a range of 0 to 120 minutes. It only turns the unit off and has no associated clock or switch on function. It is easy to use and can be useful.

TEMPERATURE CONTROL
The temperature control is selected by pressing the function button till the led next to the word temp. is illuminated. The temperature is in Deg. C and has a range of settings from 60 to 240. The temperature is in 20 deg increments in both directions. It would be ideal for simmering if it was more accurate and would allow 5 deg increments on the way down to give greater control. Two things are worth noting. Note one is that a pot with a 4 mm thick base helps stop things burning as it builds in enough thermal inertia that as the hob turns on and off due to the thermostat the heat on the bottom of the pot is not as intense.
Note two is most important and I feel less obvious. The power setting works in conjunction with the temp. function. So if the power setting is on 10 (the maximum) heat will be supplied in strong bursts to get back up to the selected temperature. This is acceptable (I find 3 better) for boiling pasta in water but not good for simmering a curry as burning on the bottom of the pot is likely to occur.

SIMMERING
Is best achieved with a power setting of 1 or 2 and a temperature setting of 60 - 100 with a thick bottomed pot. For simmering of sauces that require a little browning/frying on the base of the pot use power setting 2 else use 1. Stock is probably power setting 1 and temp. 60 or 80. Don't worry that you may think it is below 100 Deg C and wont boil to kill bacteria, it will because of the time taken for the unit to sense the temperature and momentary stop power to the induction coils. In fact your problem will be more likely too much heat being supplied.

POWER
The power is selected by pressing the function button till the led next to the word power. is illuminated. When the standby button is first pressed nothing happens other than the led next to the word 'power' flashes. One press of the function button will start the unit going at power setting 5 provided a suitable pot is in place. The power settings are from 1 to 10 up and down in steps of 1.
Power should be used in conjunction with temperature control (see SIMMERING).
10 is very hot and will warp thin pans and quickly burn the contents.
1 is much less hot but will still burn food in thin pans.
I find :-
1 to 2 for sauces and simmering.
3 to 5 is useful for general frying.
6 to 10 for boiling (10 to get the water to boiling point).
10 and a thick bottomed pan for searing steak.

ITALIAN COFFEE
I can confirm that the base of the little Italian coffee makers have too small a diameter to work properly. This is a pity but you can use an induction disc.

CONCLUSION
There is very little wasted energy which is a good thing. It is an interesting way to cook. As fast to react as gas, maybe even faster. Very safe due to the automatic cut out when no pot present or on overheating. Clean as things seldom get burned on, as the area surrounding the pot is almost cold. Pot handles stay cold. For simmering good pots with thick bottoms are best. For boiling thin pots are OK. Thin pans are not very good as if they warp, and they are likely to, things don't work very well.
The Andrew James product is reasonable priced and appears to be good value. There would seem to be a case for a better temperature control system that is more gentle and calibrated in the application of power but this may be common to all cheaper and even high end units.
It would be interesting if anyone having a more expensive or different unit would leave a comment on power/temperature control.

SAFETY NOTE
The unit will turn off after a short delay if there is no suitable pot in place.
Always centre the pot. Keep a close watch on oils as they can get very hot very quickly.
When water gets under a pot, such as steam condensing on a lid or spillage when boiling pasta, it can make it possible for the pot to aquaplane and move very easily across the ceramic from the centre of the cooking area. It is important that the unit is almost perfectly level for this reason. My unit was very little off the level and I returned to find the pot was starting to move off centre after some spillage had got under it while I was away. I think the unit would probably have shut off before disaster struck.

PREFACE
Having got to the end of this review I realized it was as much of a guide to using an Induction Hob as a review but I decided to leave it as it was because I hope that some new users will find it more useful in this form.
For those familiar with induction hobs I would buy this one again subject to my comments on temperature control which may be better on units other than this and the Lidl unit I previously bought.

DELIVERY
The delivery charge seems expensive but may be justified. I bought two to reduce the delivery cost per unit. The units arrived on time and well packaged. Set up is as easy as finding a level surface plugging it in and switching on with a suitable pot in place (see POTS).

POTS
A magnet must be attracted to the base of the pot. Induction hobs work by inducing heat in the magnetic material in the pot. Stainless steel pots are not necessarily magnetic.
There is an induction symbol on some pots but most pots with a magnetic base will be suitable for an induction hob provided the base attracts a magnate, larger than 12cm and smaller than 22 cm. There is a little tolerance so maybe 10cm to 24cm would be OK.
Pots that a magnetic will not stick to will not work unless you put a special disc under them.
The disc seems a bit fiddly and overpriced so new pots are probably a better option.
Pots that have a solid base of reasonable thickness (4mm) are most versatile (see POWER and SIMMERING).

PUSH BUTTON VERSES TOUCH CONTROLS
I had originally bought an induction hob from a different manufacturer that used touch sensitive controls under one sheet of ceramic. The good point of this was that it was very easy to keep clean the bad point was that occasionally I would accidentally change a setting or turn it off when rubbing away spillage. On balance I think I prefer the buttons on the Andrew James version.
The use of a function button to rotate through the functions has disadvantages over simple selecting the function with a single button press but it saves having an extra two buttons on the control panel. I think that the extra buttons may have been better but what is there is workable.
Edited by me on 12/5/2013 :-
The touch sensitive buttons covered by the continuous ceramic sheet is in fact far better than than the buttons which are prone to failure and require too much pressure.

BUILD QUALITY
The ceramic part where the pot is placed and the plastic parts of the control panel seem durable and of reasonable quality.
Edited by me on 12/5/2013 :-
The plastic is not as durable as it at first seemed and one of my hobs has developed a crack which means more pressure is required to make the buttons work.
NOISE
There is some fan noise but this is totally drowned out by my extractor fan as it is nothing like as loud. I don't think the noise of the unit should cause anyone using a kitchen problems.

TIMER
The timer is selected by pressing the function button till the led next to the word timer is illuminated. The timer allows you to turn the unit off after a specific amount of time has elapsed, it increments in 5 minutes on the way up and 1 minute intervals on the way down, it has a range of 0 to 120 minutes. It only turns the unit off and has no associated clock or switch on function. It is easy to use and can be useful.

TEMPERATURE CONTROL
The temperature control is selected by pressing the function button till the led next to the word temp. is illuminated. The temperature is in Deg. C and has a range of settings from 60 to 240. The temperature is in 20 deg increments in both directions. It would be ideal for simmering if it was more accurate and would allow 5 deg increments on the way down to give greater control. Two things are worth noting. Note one is that a pot with a 4 mm thick base helps stop things burning as it builds in enough thermal inertia that as the hob turns on and off due to the thermostat the heat on the bottom of the pot is not as intense.
Note two is most important and I feel less obvious. The power setting works in conjunction with the temp. function. So if the power setting is on 10 (the maximum) heat will be supplied in strong bursts to get back up to the selected temperature. This is acceptable (I find 3 better) for boiling pasta in water but not good for simmering a curry as burning on the bottom of the pot is likely to occur.

SIMMERING
Is best achieved with a power setting of 1 or 2 and a temperature setting of 60 - 100 with a thick bottomed pot. For simmering of sauces that require a little browning/frying on the base of the pot use power setting 2 else use 1. Stock is probably power setting 1 and temp. 60 or 80. Don't worry that you may think it is below 100 Deg C and wont boil to kill bacteria, it will because of the time taken for the unit to sense the temperature and momentary stop power to the induction coils. In fact your problem will be more likely too much heat being supplied.

POWER
The power is selected by pressing the function button till the led next to the word power. is illuminated. When the standby button is first pressed nothing happens other than the led next to the word 'power' flashes. One press of the function button will start the unit going at power setting 5 provided a suitable pot is in place. The power settings are from 1 to 10 up and down in steps of 1.
Power should be used in conjunction with temperature control (see SIMMERING).
10 is very hot and will warp thin pans and quickly burn the contents.
1 is much less hot but will still burn food in thin pans.
I find :-
1 to 2 for sauces and simmering.
3 to 5 is useful for general frying.
6 to 10 for boiling (10 to get the water to boiling point).
10 and a thick bottomed pan for searing steak.

ITALIAN COFFEE
I can confirm that the base of the little Italian coffee makers have too small a diameter to work properly. This is a pity but you can use an induction disc.

CONCLUSION
There is very little wasted energy which is a good thing. It is an interesting way to cook. As fast to react as gas, maybe even faster. Very safe due to the automatic cut out when no pot present or on overheating. Clean as things seldom get burned on, as the area surrounding the pot is almost cold. Pot handles stay cold. For simmering good pots with thick bottoms are best. For boiling thin pots are OK. Thin pans are not very good as if they warp, and they are likely to, things don't work very well.
The Andrew James product is reasonable priced and appears to be good value. There would seem to be a case for a better temperature control system that is more gentle and calibrated in the application of power but this may be common to all cheaper and even high end units.
Edited by me 12/5/2013:-
Since a crack developed on the plastic surface and after around 6 months use I have decided that the Lidl induction hob is more durable, the controls better and it is easier to keep clean.

It would be interesting if anyone having a more expensive or different unit would leave a comment on power/temperature control.

SAFETY NOTE
The unit will turn off after a short delay if there is no suitable pot in place.
Always centre the pot. Keep a close watch on oils as they can get very hot very quickly.
When water gets under a pot, such as steam condensing on a lid or spillage when boiling pasta, it can make it possible for the pot to aquaplane and move very easily across the ceramic from the centre of the cooking area. It is important that the unit is almost perfectly level for this reason. My unit was very little off the level and I returned to find the pot was starting to move off centre after some spillage had got under it while I was away. I think the unit would probably have shut off before disaster struck. I thank P. D. Cornish for commenting that a tea towel placed under the pot will stop the aquaplaning as it will soak up any water and it won't burn.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love my hob!, 9 Jan. 2011
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This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
Like many others, I was amazed at how quickly you can cook stuff with induction hobs - the downside is that you have to refine how you normally cook things, otherwise stuff just ends up being burned to the frying/sauce pan!

As already mentioned, this seems functionally identical to the Judge hob, only considerably cheaper. Many mention the Judge hob's 'beep' is too loud - definitely not a problem with the Andrew James hob! All of these cheap hobs seem in reality to have just one, maybe two, power level settings, achieving all the additional levels by 'cheating' - ie. by varying the duration & frequency that half/full-power is turned on. I mention this 'cos even on the lowest setting, once say a saucepan of water has reached boiling point, it will continue to visibly boil in 'spurts' as half/full power is being applied periodically. The manual mentions the lowest power-level for "simmering", whereas in reality it boils in spurts!

My only criticism (which others have also raised) concerns the "temperature" control setting - this just does not work as expected! This function depends on a temperature sensor within the hob (which itself doesn't heat up) detecting the heat from the pan via conduction. In practice, when using the 'temperature' control, the hob applies full-power to the pan, then waits until its sensor reaches the selected temperature before turning the power off. When this occurs, the pan temperature will in reality be far far higher than the selected temperature - it overshoots hugely, cremating everything in the process! At least this has been my experience. Maybe by switching from the Power to the Temperature feature after the pan had warmed sufficiently it would work as expected. Or if you had a lot off cooking to do. But using the hob 'normally' to quickly whip up some grub, the Temperature control feature is almost dangerous...

Getting technical for a minute, the one other thing that surprised me concerned the hob's power-factor. The manual correctly states that when on Standby, it only consumes about 1 watt. However due to its low power-factor, it's actually pulling over 150VA - basically, 150 watts that 'technically' you don't have to pay for, but the electricity supplier must still provide, in other words, wasted energy! And most should already realise that this kind as 'wastage' is already factored into your bill. And it's definitely not very 'environmentally-friendly'! The manual does mention though that the hob should be disconnected from the mains when not in use.

These minor gripes aside, I love my hob and wouldn't part with it!!!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HOBS FROM HEAVEN ***** via Andrew James, 18 May 2012
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This review is from: Andrew James Digital Electric Induction Hob 2000 Watt
ARE YOU SITTING COMFORTABLY ? Then I'll begin !!

The phrase ''A WATCHED POT NEVER BOILS'' can now be happily consigned to the dustbin of history !! This incredible invention DOES IT ALL... from a slow simmer, to a gentle saute, to a rolling boil, and everything in between - all COMPLETELY, controllable - whether you use the pre-sets, or the temperature control. A bright 5 year old could master both, in 5 minutes !!

Any reasonably experienced cook will tell you, that being able to SIMMER at a constant, low temperature, is an essential. Any cook IN A HURRY will tell you that bringing a pot of cold water to the boil, takes AGES. Well... NOT ANY MORE... for EITHER !! I regularly make chicken stock and then put it in the fridge. After 3 days, if it has not all been used, you have to bring it to the boil. From REFRIGERATOR COLD, to a ROLLING BOIL, TAKES ... 4 minutes !! and this is for TWO QUARTS... a lesser amount comes to a rolling boil, in a matter of SECONDS. Don't leave the kitchen thinking its going to take ages... IT DOESN'T.

We use both the temperature controls and the pre-sets... for instance, if you want to saute, it takes slightly more than #1 pre-set. It is merely a case of ''try it and see'' - after three or four days, we had a very comprehensive idea of what we needed, in ALL the regular dishes we make. The pleasure of using these incredible devices, continues to unfold on a daily basis !!

HOWEVER, what makes the steam come out my ears, is that I NEVER KNEW ABOUT THEM, UNTIL FIVE WEEKS AGO !!!!!!! grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.

If you want completely controllable cooking, install these little beauties and watch them CHANGE YOUR LIFE IN THE KITCHEN... FOREVER !!

Submitted with the greatest pleasure in the world
by
Michelle and Jeff Williams
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