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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brings back old memories
I used to spend hours and hours playing this game as a child, so I had to buy it for my child.
We all played it as soon as it arrived. The delivery was excellent and speedy. It arrived LESS than 24 hours from when I bought it, and got a lovely thank you message from the seller inside. Well worth sitting here fighting with my laptop and writing this review.
Published 24 months ago by bubbly and barmy

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74 of 89 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Breaks your heart, then mends it (before possibly going on to break it again)
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. That's how Super Mario All-Stars on Wii shall be remembered by those who like to borrow cliched Dickens intros. Nintendo presents us with two stone-cold classic examples of the platforming genre in the form of Super Mario Bros and Super Mario 3, along with two other lesser classics in the form of the Japanese and...
Published on 6 Dec 2010 by possessed.by.a.lemon


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74 of 89 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Breaks your heart, then mends it (before possibly going on to break it again), 6 Dec 2010
By 
possessed.by.a.lemon - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. That's how Super Mario All-Stars on Wii shall be remembered by those who like to borrow cliched Dickens intros. Nintendo presents us with two stone-cold classic examples of the platforming genre in the form of Super Mario Bros and Super Mario 3, along with two other lesser classics in the form of the Japanese and American sequels to the original. Just like they did on the SNES, in fact. And, as you must know by now, I literally mean JUST like they did on the SNES. This is a rom of the original cartridge. Under 2MB of data on a DVD disc. Nothing more, possibly something less when you consider that naughty illegal emulators allow you to mess around with settings to make old roms look great on HDTVs. No such luck here.

And it's the original 50hz PAL European conversion, just to rub salt in. Then again, it's how most of us will remember the games and the aspect ratio is actually correct. So no borders on the top or bottom, but it is forced to 4:3 when Virtual Console games can be stretched to widescreen. It also means that SMB is given its belated European release of 1987 on the menu, which looks somewhat stupid for something that's supposed to be celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2010. Well done, Nintendo!

Everything about this release is balanced by pros and cons. It's a lazy rip-off and yet it still offers great value for money. Whaaaaaa? Not only will newcomers get more than their money's worth in experiencing some of the best platforming ever created, it comes in a nice box with an embossed central logo, a bonus soundtrack CD and a booklet. But, wait, when trying to remove the sticky round security thingy (that's a technical term) from the box to open it, I ended up pulling some of the finish away with it. And I'm a proper nerd about these things, so while you may be able to get yours off after my warning, my TRAGEDY was by no means down to impatient carelessness. The box is unnnecessarily taller than it needs to be as well, looking silly next to your Wii games and likely to end up getting squashed in some dark corner of your cupboard, so whatever.

The booklet is more like a regular Wii manual with images of Japanese packaging. It actually comes in a regular (red) Wii game box where the manuals would normally be. You do get a sentence or two from Miyamoto for each game, though. It's nice to look through, just don't expect an actual book. And then there's the CD. On the one hand, it's 25 minutes of Mario tunes you may decide to listen to once before never letting near your CD player again. But I have to confess, I'm listening to it as I write this and I am rather enjoying the nostalgia. It's a bit good if I'm to be totally honest, even though over half the tracks have nothing to do with the four All-Stars games.

Last but most, those games themselves. Straight Wii ports of SNES versions of NES games. An amazing compilation back in 1993, still great today. As for the absence of Super Mario World that was added to a later edition, it's probably down to the controls. You can play all the games here with the Wii Remote held horizontally, but for World it would have taken the kind of reprogramming that Nintendo blatantly wasn't interested in spending time on. Back in 1993, each game benefited massively from the compilation's introduction of a save file. It's the same here and SMB3 in particular is a completely different experience when you don't have to rush your way to the end of World 8 in one sitting. In this guise, I still consider it my favourite ever Mario game.

And remember, these games are otherwise currently unavailable commercially in this 16-bit form. They only come in NES flavour on Virtual Console. So, five stars for classic games in a nicely presented package, one star for being lazy and missing the opportunity to release something that could have been as incontestably brilliant as the release of All-Stars was all those years ago, not to mention making me rip my box. Everything being equal, that sounds like an average of three stars to me. Now, Nintendo, never make me have to give three stars to Super Mario Bros. 3 again!

Recommended buy for those who've yet to experience the games? 100% yes.

Recommended whinge on Amazon afterwards in the hope of getting something a little 'fresher' next time? Absolutely!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great Games (obviously), but Mario deserves better than this!, 1 Dec 2012
This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
Twenty five years is a long time in the entertainment industry. Although at the time of this compilation's release (2010), Mario had actually been around thirty years, this was the twenty fifth anniversary of the debut of the SUPER MARIO series. The real problem with this release is as far as actual game content goes it only covers the first three years of Mario's career (1985-1988, which is the time period when the four NES Mario games were made. Though SUPER MARIO 3 came out in the US in 1990, the game had been finished and even released in Japan in 1988).

Now, depending on what you want or how you look at this release, the 25th Anniversary release is either a rather cheap marketing ploy for Nintendo to make some quick cash or a good way to get all four Mario games. I bought the title and am glad to be able to play the 16 bit remakes on the Wii, but I quite see the point that this is a rather botched release to say the least. What should have been a true celebration of Mario and what he means to Nintendo simply becomes a budget line release with an SNES rom dumped onto a disk and given some new packaging.

Now, this review is really only about the 25th anniversary release, not the games themselves. The four titles are essential centerpoints in video gaming's early history, and stand up remarkably well, even in today's multimillion dollar budgets. Yes, they are short and simple, but that's largely part of the charm. Mario has always been tremendously accessible, and for those without a lot of time, Mario is great because you can pick up and play. If you want more information on the four games I've included a portion of my original review for the SNES cart after the main review, rather than reinvent the wheel and include information on each title on this already lengthy review.

Ultimately, Mario sells systems and always has. Nintendo has learned that the hard way with the 3DS debacle. Miyamoto himself said that they should have had SUPER MARIO 3DS LAND ready for release, as that would truly demonstrate what the 3DS could do. How many times have Nintendo sold us these same four games? Lots. There are obviously the original NES titles. Then there was the SNES SUPER MARIO ALLSTARS (with the previously unreleased stateside LOST LEVELS). Then there was the Gameboy Color release. Then the Gameboy Advanced Classic NES series. Then we have the Super Mario Advance series. Then we have the Virtual Console. And now this. (And for the record, other than the Super Mario advanced series, I have bought these four games in all these various forms).

Based on Mario's pure market power, I feel Nintendo felt they were able to get away with a release like this . . . and they were right. Supposed to be a limited print run, this release quickly sold out and a lot of people began price gouging on online market places like eBay. The release proved so popular that Nintendo did another production run of the title. Although this was supposed to be a "limited edition" run, apparently the title is still in print, as you are able to purchase this new from several online sources

So what's the real problem with the 25th Anniversary Release? Well, several things.

First, this is a straight port of SUPER MARIO ALLSTARS for the SNES. And I mean just that - a STRAIGHT PORT. In SMA you are able to change the controller options and they show SNES controllers. It's rather odd to see the SNES controllers listed in this release.

Another big problem is the tremendous waste of space on the disk. With all the available space, Nintendo only includes an SNES rom? Seriously? With all the space, they could have included SUPER MARIO WORLD, SUPER MARIO 64, Gameboy titles, miscellaneous early sports NES and SNES titles, even the Gamecube's SUPER MARIO SUNSHINE. After all, this release was supposed to be a full blown celebration of Mario - he deserves better than just an SNES rom with some pretty packaging!

As far as the packing goes, you do get a booklet of Mario history and a CD. Honestly, the booklet isn't that great, with only one liners on each title from Miyamoto, Koji Kondo (the music composer), and Takashi Tezuka. You also get a (very short) cd of Mario music as well, with lots of sound effects. There is some interesting artwork in the booklet as well but that's about it.

Honestly you get more information from online sources than what is found in the booklet, especially the Nintendo series of interviews called "Iwata Asks", where Nintendo President Satoru Iwata poses various questions to about different game developers regarding products. In these you learn that the original Mario had a shooting stage (!) and the cloud levels were left over remants of that never used idea, and that the second quest in THE LEGEND OF ZELDA came about by accident, as they released they had only used half the available data on the ROM.

What would have been nice, and would have curved much of the criticism that has come against this release, is either to see more content (after all, the four NES games, being NES platformers, do not take that long to complete), or, barring that, see the four NES games updated graphically. It would have been great to play the four NES titles with NEW SUPER MARIO BROS. WII graphics. At least it would have been new, even if it was only a graphical facelift. (Ironically, Nintendo Power criticized the original SMAS in their 1993 issue for being only a facelift with nothing really new to offer, with the exception of the first ever release of LOST LEVELS).

Then the Virtual Console and download space come into the equation as well. ALL STARS has long been in demand as a Virtual Console release, although most speculated Nintendo would most likely not release that as it may cannibalize sales of the original four 8-bit Mario titles already available for through the service. Though I don't know how valid that is, personally I think ALLSTARS would have been better served as a Virtual Console release, and the price would have been much cheaper as well. (As of December 2011 we still haven't gotten SUPER MARIO WORLD 2: YOSHI'S ISLAND released, which along with SUPER MARIO SUNSHINE is the only Mario title I really haven't played, although SMW2 is a Yoshi game, not a Mario game).

So over all, as an celebration of Mario's career, this "25th Anniversary Release" comes off rather poorly, and gives the distinct impression Nintendo really didn't put that much effort (because they didn't). Knowing the market would purchase this title without any real effort on their part, Nintendo threw the SNES ROM on the disk, gave it some minimal packaging, and wah-la, instant seller!

And you know what? They were right. I bought my copy. So if you want the 16-bit remakes of the four Mario titles and feel justified paying thirty to fifty bucks retail for an SNES Rom first released in 1993, go for it. After all, it's Mario, and for family entertainment it's a great way to go. I just wish Nintendo had given Mario a better anniversary celebration.

5 stars for the games, 1 star for pure laziness and market reliance on Nintendo's part (1 star is on this release only and is no way an indictment against the games).
.
.
-----
Taken from my review of the original SNES title which includes later versions included SUPER MARIO WORLD
SUPER MARIO ALLSTARS, an anthology of the first four NES Mario games for the SNES, was one of the most popular titles Nintendo released during the early 1990s. Since these titles were such staples of the NES, it was only logical to port them to SNES with a graphical overhaul, options to save, and (for America anyway) the release of a long lost game called LOST LEVELS. Also, depending on what version of this you get, in later releases they also packaged SUPER MARIO WORLD as well, making this a one stop shop for those looking for a Mario fix. These are the games.

SUPER MARIO BROTHERS: The single most popular game ever released, and also the most widely circulated. Largerly responsible for saving the video game industry after the historic crash of 1984, it is now easy to forget (especially for younger gamers) how revolutionary this title was when it first came out. 8 expansive worlds, bright colourful graphics, and much more complex than the usual one-screen games that dominated in the late 1970s and early 1980s. A real technological breakthrough and a historic landmark in gaming, even all these years later it holds up with pixel-perfect graphics and rock-solid game play. Don't miss this one.

THE LOST LEVELS: The original followup to SMB; released only in Japan. Deemed to hard for the American markets, another game was given Mario sprites and released in America as SMB2. This title, however, is notoriously difficult. I always think of it as the second quest, like in the original Zelda. If you go through all 8 levels without warping, you get to a secret world, 9, before going on to worlds A-D. When ALLSTARS first came out, Nintendo Power had a promotion that if you got to world 9 they would send you a Mario badge. Ah, the memories! Still, if you really want to test your metal against incredibly difficult old-school Mario levels, this game isn't to be missed. Lots of fun all around. Some levels, however, make you think Shigeru Miyamoto has a sadistic streak in him. Closet America ever got to the original 8-bit release was Super Mario Deluxe for the Game Boy Colour, though that was lacking the last five bonus levels and did not have all the same graphics as the original SMB2 did.

SUPER MARIO BROTHERS 2: Also known as SUPER MARIO BROTHERS USA in Japan (released in 1992 there and 1988 stateside), this is the odd man out in the series. The game play couldn't be more different than the original SMB if they tried. The story is Nintendo didn't think they'd be able to sell SMB2 to the American markets, so they took a pre-existing game, DOKI DOKI PANIC, changed a few sprites around, and put the Nintendo seal of approval on it. (For those of you who have access to the original game booklet that was released with SMB2, the picture of Phanto, the guardian of the keys, is the original sprite from DOKI DOKI, and looks different than what appeared in the Mario version. When I was little I always wondered why the sprite looked different from the game). DOKI DOKI's story is a family's pet monkey disppeared into a book and had to be rescued. To see the ending, you had to complete the game four times, once with each major character. The Internet has a wealth of info on the differences between the Mario version and the original version. What I always remember about this game is how fast it sold when it came out in 1988. As far as game play goes, there are four selectable characters, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. Mario, naturally, is the most well-rounded, though my brother and I always used Luigi for his jumping skills. The levels are very odd, contributing to the overall dream-like, bizarre quality that is so inhertant in this game. A huge smash when it was released, but easily the strangest Mario game in the canon. Little surprise when you find out it's rather dubious origins (I was in shock when I found out about in the late 1990s). Ironically enough, Miyamoto purportedly had much more to deal with the development of this game than the Japanese SMB2.

SUPER MARIO BROTHERS 3: The best selling game ever released independently*, SMB3 greatly expanded the Mario universe with the introduction of several new enemies, Bowser's children (who was the mother, I wonder? Godzilla's ex?), and introduced cool new suites for Mario to wear. The game play was more expansive than ever, with cool new secrets to discover and eight tremendously large worlds. This game laid the foundation for so many other plat-formers, especially SUPER MARIO WORLD. While SMB2 felt like a weird detour, SMB3 took Mario back to the atmosphere or the original game, taking it a thousand different directions, and coming up with one of the best games ever developed. Although there were a few tweaks for the ALL STARS release (some levels got a few more coins to make it easy to access game secrets), like the other games this is tremdously faithful to the original NES release. That alone makes this essential playing.

SUPER MARIO WORLD: The later versions of this compilation included SUPER MARIO WORLD as well. Taking the foundation laid down in SMB3, Nintendo created this flagship title for their pristine new 16 bit console. Very much of a piece wtih SMB3, although eliminating all the cool suits of its predecessor, Nintendo turned in a stellar, expertly designed platformer that once again set the standards for video games everywhere. Just like SMB3, and the other titles less so, the game eases you into its mechanics with such ease and percision that, just like the Amazon editorial says, you'll be flying and tossing fireballs and riding around in no time. Essential gaming. Plus you get to ride the dinosaur Yoshi and make him eat enemies! How cool is that?

Overall, one of the best carts you can have for the SNES. The only real drawback is the original versions of the NES games weren't included. What would have been great is after you finished each game you unlocked the original 8-bit version. But that (minor) complaint aside, if you want to know what made early gaming so great, or want to relive a bit of nostalgia from your childhood, you can't go wrong with this title.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brings back old memories, 6 Sep 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
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This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
I used to spend hours and hours playing this game as a child, so I had to buy it for my child.
We all played it as soon as it arrived. The delivery was excellent and speedy. It arrived LESS than 24 hours from when I bought it, and got a lovely thank you message from the seller inside. Well worth sitting here fighting with my laptop and writing this review.
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28 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What were you expecting?, 24 Dec 2010
By 
Colin House "October Kindler" (Hampshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
The negative reviews in regard to this release are insane in my eyes. What exactly were you expecting?

It's clearly been marketed as a re-release of the SNES Mario All Stars bundle with an added booklet/CD in some nice packaging to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the greatest gaming series of all time. All the games are still hugely entertaining (Yes, even 2; which is mediocre by Mario terms but still miles ahead of other games) and have aged extremely well.

Buy this product if you're a die hard Mario fan, or for your children who have never experienced 2D Mario in all it's glory.

This product gives you exactly what it says it does and that is more than enough for me.
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22 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just in time for Christmas (said the cynic), 3 Dec 2010
By 
Paul McNamee "Rambleast Reviews" (North Ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
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This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
First thing you have to deal with when you're considering whether or not to buy this game is the price: Amazon's current listing is at 17.99 - the average SNES game on the Wii's Virtual Console download service sells for around 7's worth of Wii Points. Knowing that Super Mario All-Stars is (I hesitate to say 'merely') a SNES game, can you justify paying nearly three times that price for this disc and its bundled extras? If the answer is yes (or if you are unaware of the Virtual Console function on the Wii) and you want some classic Mario gameplay this Christmas, read on.

Super Mario All-Stars is arguably the greatest game cart ever released. Contained thereon are graphically- and aurally- updated versions of Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 2 (the weird onion-throwing one that everyone seems to hate, and brief research reveals wasn't really a Mario game at all), Super Mario Bros. 3 and The Lost Levels (the one that looks like the first one but from the very first level is considerably more difficult). All four games were originally released on the NES console between 1985 and 1988 and enjoyed massive success, and the All-Stars cart (which makes each look as though they were built for the SNES, basically feeling more like the incomparably perfect Super Mario World, available separately) too was a must-own for that latter console.

This 25th Anniversary Edition changes nothing. All the aesthetic benefits of the All-Star versions are present and correct (as is the save system that made Lost Levels playthroughs so much less gruelling), but beyond the included booklet and CD, nothing in this set is new- the games' development has paused in 1993, and this plays just like it ever did (purists may moan about the change of physics in the first Mario game, but you'll get used to it by the first castle, and LIKE IT).

Regardless of what must seem like griping above, I can wholly recommend this. For those of you buying it for the family to enjoy this Christmas, it's STILL a must-have game- it offers more gameplay hours than the average modern adventure game and the replay value is endless (I'm still playing my yellowed SNES copy these days, which is long due a retirement). The designs are imaginative and timeless and Koji's Kondo's themes, every single one of them, will be stuck in your head for years. Forget New Super Mario Bros. Wii, forget Mario Kart Wii, forget everything- this is THE family Mario game this Christmas.

The CD included is a nice touch (though the die-hards amongst you will, like me, have hunted down the full soundtracks years ago) and the booklet too is a pleasant distraction, but the real gem is the disc, finally available. Sure, the price is more than it would have cost to download through the Wii, but that doesn't mean it isn't worth every single penny.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Four classics on one disc., 17 April 2014
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This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
This may be a ROM of the old Super Nintendo game of the same name, but it's still a top notch title to have for your Wii, simply because the Mario games included are THAT good. This title includes 16-bit renditions of the classic NES titles Super Mario Bros (the game that propelled the plumber into stardom), Super Mario Bros 2 (a unique and actually pretty good game), Super Mario Bros 3 (arguably one of the best Mario games ever made even to this day) and Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (the Japanese Super Mario Bros 2, which is very much like the first but is brutally difficult). I would have liked to have seen Super Mario World in this collection to really round out the package but this is certainly not a bad deal. I would recommend this.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Love it., 21 Mar 2014
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This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
Love it, love it, love it. Arrived on time and the game is exactly like the old one. I love it.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition for Wii, 6 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
The box was scuffed on the sides and corners as described, however my grandson has played every single game and thinks it is brilliant
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5.0 out of 5 stars Like Going back in Time, 18 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
This Games take you back to a time when video games did not need to be anything other than super fun!

Super Mario all stars is the ultimate Fun passing of time!

I strongly recommend it!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good old times!, 19 May 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Super Mario All-Stars - 25th Anniversary Edition (Wii) (Video Game)
First off, the prices for this on here if just stupid. I payed 19 maybe less for mine pre-owned from game, yes its not brand new but it works all the same! I've loved re-playing my old fav's from the mario series and would suggest any mario fan of all ages to give it a go. However, i've read some of the other reviews and I have to agree, they could of done so much more by adding some more of the oldies as there are so many good ones to choose from. I'd love to see a re release of all the old marios, but i guess at least this was a start! The only problem I have is if you die, you start at the begining of the world again (if you haven't beat the midway castle) or if you run out lives. Its also more tricky than I remember but its still very enjoyable
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