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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A adventure-rpg with surprises
Please note that Divinity II:DKS is the much revamped, reissued game from the previously rushed released Divinity 2:Ego's Draconis, released 1+ years before Divinity II:DKS...DKS has now been polished in all areas with improved graphics and sound, stable smoother framerate, improved revamped gameplay mechanics with many previous game bugs now removed (though expect a few...
Published on 10 Mar 2011 by Tec-know

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great build up but..
It's a well-executed concept and the opening sequences are very engaging. I played the demo first and wanted to go on to get the game as a result. I wasn't disappointed. It's well-scripted, humorous and the voice acting is for the most part good. The graphics are good and in some places very good. The issues that the game has are that the quest and map systems are...
Published on 26 Aug 2011 by P. A. Irving


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A adventure-rpg with surprises, 10 Mar 2011
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
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This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
Please note that Divinity II:DKS is the much revamped, reissued game from the previously rushed released Divinity 2:Ego's Draconis, released 1+ years before Divinity II:DKS...DKS has now been polished in all areas with improved graphics and sound, stable smoother framerate, improved revamped gameplay mechanics with many previous game bugs now removed (though expect a few here and there on game this scale). DKS also includes the well received 'Flame Of Vengeance' expansion pack. DKS is a good old-school (with modern development) rpg mix of hardish adventure, action, exploration (be warned directions/pointers are very limited esp on sidequests) and surprises. This is not a game that leads you by the hand(Fable III), and because of this, makes the game a much deeper playing experience. Discovering new areas or paths, exploring dungeons, finding characters and secrets, completing many of the side-quests (plenty to do within the main and fairly varied side-quests); all give a feeling of satisfaction by discovering and completing them yourself. Divinity II:DKS may not have the most involving story - don't let that put you off!! What you do have is a vast adventure, interesting and sometimes funny characters(for wrong and right reasons), a feeling of game progression, decent crafted fighting mechanics (make sure you level-up and use a form of strategy), large vast areas to explore, quality graphics and atmosphere with good music, secrets to discover & solve, character building rpg abilities, and not forgetting dragons!. The game does have a few minor faults and may disappoint in certain areas with creativity, but, it is also very well developed in many areas and overcome the not so well developed sections.

Once completed the main game: Flame Of Vengeance will then automatically continue after the cut-scene. The game will continue with your equipped weapons and with your skill level. FOV feels very polished with the gameplay now moving away from action(though still here) to more puzzles and solving quests. This all adding more and extended variety to Divinity II as whole, adding another almost 20+hrs gameplay time(depending how much you do). A great expansion that's well worth it's playtime.

Overall Divinity II:DKS is a well produced game that will please those who like to explore and discover, achieve and accomplish, dabble in role playing and character skill building all without being overwhelmed with tips/hints or being lead by the hand (Fable, Mass Effect, DA2). A game that will appeal to those who wanted a vast more polished adventure Two Worlds 1, a deeper rpg/adv experience then Fable III, a third view perspective Oblivion with better controls and greater variety with graphics, and a bit of Diablo action with plenty of looting and questing all with many hours gameplay. This is a quality old school rpg and adventure for deep adventure seekers & is for now one of my favourite Rpg's on this gen consoles: Demon's Souls(PS3) and Oblivion(sort of) my other favs.

HINT: Make sure to save very often, esp before going into unknown areas and before dungeons, also before large battles. This is due to the auto-save working fairly randomly.

HINT: Explore, explore, explore - there are many items, areas, secrets, characters that can be missed if you don't go off the track to look around. This is also a great way to level-up and discover.

Other qualitry rpg/adventure/action goodness worth checking:
Castlevania - Lords of Shadow (Xbox 360/PS3), Majin and The Forsaken Kingdom (Xbox 360/PS3), The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion - Classics Edition (Xbox 360/PS3), Valkyria Chronicles (PS3), Demons Souls (PS3)
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The BEST Xbox RPG, 10 Dec 2010
By 
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
This has been one of the biggest gaming surprises for me.

I bought this expecting a poor, run of the mill, no depth RPG. I couldn't be more wrong.

For me, it outshines those big titles like Oblivion and Fallout. The gameplay is smooth, it has a no fuss interface, it's controls spot on, levelling system is fun, no grinding whatsoever, 100's of quests, etc, etc

I could go on and on with praise for this amazing release. Oh, and the devs have done an incredible job updating the graphics for the Xbox.

The only glaring downside is the loading times when exiting buildings. It can take up to 30 seconds. It's not a deal breaker when the game is this good.

I highly recommend Divinity 2. It's without question the best game I've played this year (if not the last two years).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I preferred it to Oblivion, which is saying a lot, 23 May 2011
By 
T. Edwards - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
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This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
There have been a tiny handful of perfect games and this is not one of them. However, it is a lot of fun and so engaging that I did pretty much nothing but play this, go to work and occasionally sleep for the two weeks it took me to complete it.

The game is pretty much the bastard child of Oblivion and Fable I. From Oblivion it gets the free roaming element and broad scope for character development; from Fable it gets its sense of humour, regional British accents (primarily north of the Watford gap for some reason), relatively cartooney graphic style and more arcadey approach to combat.

The game contains all the great RPG staples: the transcendent joy of levelling up; killing things in variety of ways; exploring a beautiful but often hostile environment; looting the bodies of your slain enemies; smashing barrels and shopping. What's unusual is your ability to turn into a dragon and, while the dragon is somewhat smaller than I'd anticipated, it's still a lot of fun to dive off a cliff and morph in mid air.

The skill trees allow a surprising amount of variety in the ways you can kill things. It is realatively painless to reassign all your skill points too, which is great as it means it's never too late to consider a change of career. I explored the path of the ranger, packing long distance death in the shape of exploding and posionous arrows, mixing it up with a blend of offensive and defensive magic, but I barely scratched the surface of the different possibilites. If I was the kind of person who replayed games, I imagine I'd get a lot of mileage out of creating new combination classes to try out as I pursued those unsolved quests from my first play through.

Combat is much more engaging than in Oblivion, with a stronger sense of tactics and strategy. You can play it with your reflexes or, if things get too hot, you can use the pause feature liberally, which allows you to take your time to drink potions, change your armour and select your targets and spells. This means it's pretty much up to you how hard you want to make it for yourself.

Loot is fairly easy to come by from exploring, searching bodies and completing quests. If you invest some skill points in lockpicking you can plunder various treasure chests and, unlike Oblivion, nobody will think any the worse of you for it. While this may stretch the realism a bit (because as an RPG player you naturally care so much about realism) I found it refreshingly simple. Your carrying capacity is also much greater than in Oblivion and merchants tend to be better funded, which means you won't have to spend hours trekking back and forth between the dungeon and the shops to turn your loot into liquid cash.

There are plenty of good quality weapons, armour pieces and magic items knocking around which give you a welcome boost without unbalancing things. Every now and then you find something a bit special which might well help to define the path your character takes.

Travel is fairly straightforward as none of the maps is particularly large and there are a number of different quick travel options. Generally it's nice to take the slow path because the scenery is pretty spectacular and there are a staggering number of encounters on offer.

Graphically, though the game is less detailed than Oblivion, I found it more pleasing to the eye, with a warmer palette of colours. The design of characters and locations are great. The music ranges from good to really good, really helping to establish atmosphere.

To me, the real strength of this game is the huge and varied array of side quests. These are essentially optional though if you want to level up enough to tackle the big baddies, you're going to have do quite a lot of them. This is in no way arduous however, if anything I would say the main story line can sometimes distract from the real business of completing side quests. There's an amazing amount of variety in what you have to do, expanding very inventively on the basic themes of go there, kill him and bring me that. The predominant trend in all the story lines is toward humour and I found a lot of it genuinely funny, though if it doesn't tickle your particular funny bone then this game is probably not going to be for you.

There are some flaws with the game: I played this on a console and found that the shortage of buttons put a very tight cap on the number of skills I could realistically call on at any one time. Not a huge fault but a definite limitation.

More seriously, there are elements of platforming sprinkled through the game and just because you can sometimes turn into a dragon, you still can't jump like Mario. This can lead to some frustration but fortunately, it doesn't happen too often.

Loading times are fairly long. Not enough to ruin the game but enough to put you off wanting to go in and out of buildings any more than you really need to. Fortunately, the game is structured so you generally don't need to do that too much.

Whereas the challenge level rises to balance your growing awesomeness pretty well for the first half of the game, you will eventually reach a point where you are just a bit too awesome to really feel threatened any more, even though sudden death is always on the menu one way or another. This is a bit of a shame. So long as you're saving often it inevitably becomes a gentle downhill cruise to the finale, which if you play the game as obsessively as I did, will probably be a bit of a relief.

Finally a word of advice: put skill points into mind reading early in the game and read everybody's mind! It nearly always pays off.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great build up but.., 26 Aug 2011
By 
P. A. Irving (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
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This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
It's a well-executed concept and the opening sequences are very engaging. I played the demo first and wanted to go on to get the game as a result. I wasn't disappointed. It's well-scripted, humorous and the voice acting is for the most part good. The graphics are good and in some places very good. The issues that the game has are that the quest and map systems are somewhat inflexible - useful, but not all that user-friendly - and if you've not pursued one quest line for a while it can be difficult to find out where you're supposed to go to resume another. Most fundamentally, though, the story ends extremely abruptly and, arguably, before all of the ideas have been executed. So much so that I actually didn't realise when Ego Draconis had ended and the expansion part had begun, because the former happened so abruptly. It's doubtless set up for a sequel and in this respect does the job well, but I think there's just too little of the part of the game between setting the action up and concluding it. As a result, just when I was starting to get in the swing of things, it finished... A fun ride but be aware before you start that it's in two main sections, not three as is implied.

The expansion is a lot of fun and a really good example of how a smallish map can yield a huge amount of gameplay. That said, there are so many quests at this point (good!) that the problems with the quest log system are clearly exposed (bad).

Worth the cash; glad I played but could have been improved...
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And Thus The Dragon Knight's Story Comes To An End, 18 Dec 2010
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
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This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
After reviewing the original game, I told you to wait till The Dragon Knight saga and here it is. The original campaign has been tweaked somewhat. There are fewer anti-dragon zones (Areas, which when entered as a dragon - kill you due to the magic in them) and armour and weapons look more detailed. The camera has also be changed and looks much better and the inventory system resembles that of the lovely Dragon Age inventory system. There is one big con though: any characters you made within the original game - Ego Draconis cannot be carried over to the expansion. You'll have to create a new character and play through the entire campaign again or start as a lv 35 character for the expansion. The Dragon Knight Saga is not recognized as the same game as the original release which is why save games from that version are not compatible.

The RPG elements of Divinity II are great. You have several skill trees. You can focus on leveling up on one to make one class or you can level up on all or certain ones to make your own unique class so each time your class will be different. You can be an archer who is an master at two handed fighting or a Mage who is an master at wielding a two handed weapon or how about a warrior who can use attack spells? Yes you can chose whatever class you like and just like Two worlds if you don't like your choices you can change them later on in the game as long as you have the right amount of gold. Other than the skill tree, you have the regular HP, Mana, Strength, intelligence and so on.

The combat is decent and you have the ability to assign certain skills to different buttons. However, you can't fly from your Battle Tower to the Orobas Fjords even though The Battle Tower can be spotted from there and there are no massive open spaces other than Damien's flying fortresses and the Orobas Fjords for you travel through as your dragon form and a blocking button would have been nice. Overall this is still a good RPG and a good one for the 360 and it has some memorable music but it could have been so much better.

Score:

8/10

Flames of Vengeance:

The expansion has you roam the city of Aleroth. The expansion is quite different from the main campaign - there is more talking and solving puzzles and less fighting. Most quests are handled very well and unlike the main campaign - there are more choices to make - each with their own consequences with some which could even see the death of an NPC/NPCs. Some of the areas are good to explore - one area is an asylum where mental patients lurk about.... Other areas are haunted houses and even a house that is burning down which you can enter to save a baby! However, I found that the city was too bright, too bright for your eyes. I also believe that there could have been more action in the expansion, especially in a game where the main campaign had plenty of action, it seems silly to make the expansion less action packed.

So Overall, I give the expansion 6/10

Update:

After playing through the expansion again, I can understand why Larian Studios added more quests and puzzles, when you now know how to complete them and where to find things, all the quests are appealing because there are no markers telling you where to go and you feel rewarded when you complete a quest. The expansion (much like most of the main game) doesn't hold your hand when it comes to quests and during my first playthrough, I spent hours just searching for a way to complete one of the quests. The quests in the expansion actually require you to think more than the quests in the main campaign and I found this to be a very simulating experience. I understand that some hate the expansion for this reason but they've obviously got caught up in the action packed loot fest that was the main game.

New expansion score 10/10

A good original RPG. Recommended.

P.S

I don't view replies.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Divine game, 1 Feb 2011
By 
CE Pattemore "VulpineX" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
I'm about 10 hours into this and I can't recommend it highly enough.

The previous game I completed was Dragon Age and all of it's DLC. This is even more fun than that.

Looks good, plays great. One of those rare games that gets me thinking about it when not playing (no wonder my summoned ghost keeps dying - I really should upgrade him).

This is one of very few reviews I've written. I was compelled to when I saw it's average of three and a half stars. "It's much better than that", I thought so here we are.

I really, really like it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unpolished but fun, 2 Sep 2011
By 
John Clayton III (Greystoke) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
The 'cheap and nasty' Western RPG has become a bit of a staple of consoles in recent generations, with the success of Oblivion in particular seeing a steady stream of truly awful Western RPG Lord of the Rings-a-likes pop up like a malignant tumour on the testicle of modern console gaming. The likes of Venetica or Two Worlds 1 or Risen and their ilk have just diluted the credibility of the Western RPG to a severe degree over the past few years, with only the Dragon Age series and Mass Effect 2 standing as genuinely great titles in the genre now seeing as Fallout has descended completely into broken unplayability with it's most recent release. However, there are rare occasions when a surprise release slips in under the radar that is actually pretty good... and hardly anyone seems to notice. Dragon Knight Saga is one such title.

Building your own character from scratch as per usual, the game begins with you as a rookie 'Dragon Slayer' just finishing up your initiation into the slayers when you and your squad are called to a small village that is having problems with a dragon. You hunt the beast down, but as it is dying it transfers it's power to your character, giving him/her the ability to transform into a dragon and leaving you labelled an abomination by the other slayers. So then you go off to find a way to gain control of your new dragon powers while fulfilling any quests that come your way in the process and while avoiding running afoul of feared dragon powered tyrant Damien, whose vast armies are preparing to invade your home country. This is all fairly typical medieval fantasy territory with little in the way of any real imagination or original ideas. The story isn't BAD per se, but there are some real missteps in the narrative in the latter stages of the game, in particular when you reach the "end" of the main game scenario (Ego Draconis) the expansion pack included on this disc (Flames of Vengeance) kicks in seamlessly as soon as you view the ending sequence for Ego Draconis, which I something I didn't realise until I had finished both scenarios. Now, the problem here is that there is a noticeable shift in pacing and gameplay focus after the expansion kicks in, with a greatly reduced area to explore and certain gameplay elements almost entirely removed. The story really takes a distinct nosedive after this point and the whole thing ends on a very unsatisfying and inconclusive manner. If the game had just ended at the Ego Draconis it would have been a rubbish ending but I'm not sure that the continuation offered by Flames of Vengeance is actually any better. It's a great world the developers have come up with for this game, but the story they set in it really doesn't do it justice.

The gameplay itself is a very rough around the edges affair. It has all the stat building, equipment tweaking fine detail that you expect from games like this and it does a pretty superb job of keeping the level grinding and character building a compulsive element of the gameplay without ever getting overly boring. The combat is actually quite fun, with fast paced real time hack and slashing and tons of skills and spell to learn and use and a rather neat little addition in the form of Necromancy, which allows you to create and customise your own Frankenstein's monster like goblin creature/pet that you can summon at any time in battle to fight alongside you. It can be equipped with body parts that impart skills/spells/stat boosts and can actually make a real difference in battle. Sadly the game's controls are more of a hindrance than a help it must be said, as your combat set up is that you have to assign a weapon or skill to the D-Pad and the X, Y, B and A buttons to use them. So assigning your sword to X will mean X swings your sword in battle, assigning a crossbow to Y will shoot, etc... It is a very simplistic set up but at the same time is extremely irritating to use in execution, as you are constantly having to tap directions in the d-pad and face buttons in order to keep spells active or use potions in addition to simultaneously attacking during battles where it very easy to get ganged up on by high powered opponents who can overwhelm you in no time. It's already a challenging game, but the awkward controls make it harder at times, though it doesn't overly hurt the game to any serious degree on the whole I guess, it just provides an occasional annoyance you could probably be doing without. The other aspect of the game is when you are in dragon form, which is far more straightforward than ground combat when you're in battle and also provides some truly superb scope for increased exploration, as in the larger, more open areas you are free to transform at any time and can easily do stuff like fly up a mountain to reach a tiny cave entrance near the peak and transform into a human again to enter it. The dragon form mechanic is very well employed here and really does add something to the game, but I just wish there were more big areas that allowed you to use it. The exploration element of the game is well realised for the most part, even if it suffers from the usual dungeon repetition that games like this tend to always have. The only real issue is with the jumping mechanics, as the jumping is so imprecise and hard to properly aim/judge distance with that some of the more platforming intensive sequences(Which are rare) can be very frustrating. The structure of the quests, armour management, stat building and levelling up is truly addictive though. Whatever other shortcomings this game may have, it is still utterly compulsive when you've got a well developed character with high powered equipment to play around with. The 'mind reading' mechanic during conversations where you 'spend' experience points to hear a character's true thoughts is a neat addition as well.

Visually, the game is a fairly patchy, jerky affair with the occasional flash of impressive. The design work is solid and the villages and towns are very nicely put together, but the game's crowning visual achievement is in it's equipment design, as the level of detail on weapons and armour you have equipped is just exceptional to look at... shame the character models aren't quite as impressive though. The framerates are pretty unstable throughout as well unfortunately and the game physics are very stiff. The soundwork is variable, with mostly generic music broken up by the occasional catchy tune and voice work that isn't so much 'good' as it is 'amusing' as it is both fairly stiff and pretty OTT at times to boot, with the narrator who explains your unspeaking character's actions(eg: "You encounter an old, worn altar. What will you do next?") being a genuine highlight for me.

So while this is a very unpolished game with some really irritating control issues, it is still a really enjoyable RPG with some truly compulsive elements to it and a very long play time(Took me 60 hours to go through both stories). It is really good value for money these days for what you get on the disc and as long as you can deal with some slight annoyances and a dumb central story then this one is highly recommended from me.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oblivion the slightly lesser....., 18 July 2011
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
This is a brilliant 3rd player RPG - no doubt about it. It plays like oblivion with the combat being more like fable combat. THere's plenty of questing and dungeons and shopping and chatting to random NPC's just like all the best RPG's.

The Upsides:
1. The graphics are lovely, so is the sound track and voice acting.
2. The story is great It will have you hooked very quickly.
3. True explorers are rewarded, there is much to find for those who are not just battering through asap.
4. Shopping and equipping your character is fun.
5. The game is huge and there are over 100 hours of game play in it.
6. You get to turn into a Dragon and fly about. It really adds a new dimension to exploring.
7. Summoning creatures and pets is great. Really helps you out in a fight.

The downsides:

1. The controls. You can't change their set-up and personally, they were not set up the way I like them.
2. The combat. Its ok but you can't block, combat rolling can be quirky (you end up jumping a lot by accident).
3. Any sequence that involves quick jumping is a nightmare. I often ended up jumping too far or just walking off ledges. You can't really control your jump distance very well.
4. The autosave system seems totally random and happens at the most inconvenient times (eg. mid battle etc.) There seems to be no rhyme or reason to it - save often manually.

That's it really. On balance - buy it!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Real RPG, 30 Mar 2011
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
I was looking around for an RPG to buy after cancelling my pre-order for Dragon Age 2 and stumbled across this. I wasn't expecting much and got a very pleasant surprise. I won't repeat what has already been written by other reviewers but TechKnow's review mirrors my own opinion. Although this game has a few flaws, it is a proper RPG and really deserves 4 1/2 stars, if Amazon's review system had allowed it. Companies who make proper RPGs should be supported and I can't recommend this game highly enough.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Flawed gem., 4 Mar 2011
By 
E. Reardon "The Yoff" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) (Video Game)
Despite some flaws, this game has a lot of depth for those willing to invest the time. This is a true RPG rather then an action adventure with RPG elements like fable; as such it does not hold you by the hand every step of the way and make it obvious when a decision will have consequences.

You are given a very healthy amount of freedom, especially during the latter half of the game, and once you have your Dragon form you can explore a huge area that has many hidden rewards. A large part of the game is optional, in that you can complete the game while ignoring about 60-70% of the explorable area, and I think that a gamer who focuses solely on completing the story quests as quickly as possible could probably complete the game in around 10 hours, on easy mode of course. Otherwise you can expect 50+ hours of gaming from your first run through.

The graphics are pleasant with some sections being particularly impressive, but don't expect to have your draw dropped. Games such as Two Worlds 2 and Arcania are certainly superior in the graphical department; especially when it comes to ambient effects such as weather. But don't let that put you off as the game more then makes up for it with the gameplay and huge number of diverse quests.

Being a seasoned RPG gamer, I played through on the hardest difficulty and this offered a significant challenge during the first 60% or so of the game. After about the half way point though I had developed an extremely powerful character, it effectively made the combat redundant since I could annihilate any foe with ease, including the bosses. It got to the point where I could just put the controller down and allow one of the late boss characters to keep hitting me until it died from the aura damage from my enchantments. My character healed rapidly enough that it was simply not possible for this boss to kill me, and from the dialogue I believe this boss was meant to be extremely powerful.

I admit I did invest a lot of time in creating the most deadly avatar possible; studying the stats of armour, jewellery and weapon sets in detail, and enchanting, charming and combining these elements with wise investment of stat and skill points. I explored everywhere, completing approximately 70% of available side-quests, and spent a lot of time looking at merchant inventories etc. In short, I played the game to the best of my ability and was rewarded with a nigh invincible god-like character that dominated even though the game was on the hard difficulty.

This was still a lot of fun, even with the combat presenting such little challenge during the latter half of the game, I felt that this was justified considering the time I spent on developing my character. The story still drove me on, and it was still extremely satisfying to assault and crush an entire enemy fortress alone, then goad each boss character knowing I could b@tch slap them.

The point of telling you all this is not just to boast, it's to indicate that the game has enough elements aside from the combat that it is still highly enjoyable even when fighting becomes a non-issue. There is a hell of a lot of dialogue for those that enjoy talking, and there are many quests that can be completed having never engaged in combat at all if you are smart about the responses you give. A rare thing in most RPG's.

Combat itself can be as simple or complex as you want it to be, it all depends on what kind of character you create. It involves the use of 8 totally customisable hotkey assignments to the face buttons and the D-pad, which occasionally can seem like too few if you have a complex character.

The story is not particularly memorable, but the way it is told there is always the promise of more power as you progress and if anything this is far more motivating then the typical cliche big bad of most RPG's.

Anyway, if you want a true RPG which offers plenty of depth should you choose to invest the time while including a gameplay changing ability to transform into a dragon at will, then you should go for this!
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Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360)
Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga (Xbox 360) by Focus Home Interactive (Xbox 360)
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