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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Melody flows from Dvorak's pen like water from a tap.
In the early '60s, I developed an interest in the Dvorak symphonies beyond the evergreen "Symphony from the New World" and began acquiring a complete set on the Artia label from Czechoslovakia. These were authoritative, idiomatic performances, but the sound quality – and the lack of stereo on at least a few of them – left me wishing for more.
I had barely...
Published on 13 Sep 2003 by Bob Zeidler

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0 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Sent wrong disK
I discovered I was sent two copies of Disk 5 and no Disk 6 with Symphony 9 on. I returned it without any fuss from Amazon and got a proper replacement in a couplke of days.
I love the symphonies and would give the second transaction 5 stars.
Published on 16 May 2012 by R Lee


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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Melody flows from Dvorak's pen like water from a tap., 13 Sep 2003
By 
Bob Zeidler (Charlton, MA United States) - See all my reviews
In the early '60s, I developed an interest in the Dvorak symphonies beyond the evergreen "Symphony from the New World" and began acquiring a complete set on the Artia label from Czechoslovakia. These were authoritative, idiomatic performances, but the sound quality – and the lack of stereo on at least a few of them – left me wishing for more.
I had barely finished this Artia set when the first release or two of Istvan Kertész’s performances with the London Symphony, then on London LPs, hit the market. I can't really remember, at this late date, which was the first in the set except that it included a performance of the "Hussite Overture" that literally blew me away. In pretty short order, I soon had a second full set of Dvorak symphonies – the Kertész set – in splendidly up-to-date stereo sound and in performances that sounded, if anything, even more idiomatic than those Artia performances. And, as noted, a large part of the "freshness" to these Kertész performances may well be due to his relaxed approach to what had been for him new repertoire.
I don't know that there's ever been a more melodic composer than Dvorak. Some might opt for Tchaikovsky, but I would differ with them. Even Dvorak's early symphonies – long unknown to concert-goers and record-collectors – have the gift of spontaneous melody, if not the perfection of craft that his later works in the genre did. And his overtures and orchestral scherzi matched the symphonies in melodiousness: the "In Nature's Realm" Overture is downright irresistable in this respect.
This boxed set of the works, remastered for CD, is a splendid bargain. The remastered sound need take second place to any other integral set of the Dvorak symphonies (save one, which I mention briefly at the end). And of course the full magic of Kertész’s performances is there for all to enjoy without concern for "settling for second best" in any respect.
But I have a few gripes about how Decca has gone about this CD release. The set of symphonies and overtures comes in two 4-CD jewel boxes inside a slipcase. But there are only 6 CDs, the penny-pinching for which leads to awkward sidebreaks for a few of the symphonies. And the "Hussite Overture" – one of the very best in the set, and one of the very best performances of the work anywhere – is nowhere to be found.
How much better it would have been had Decca seen fit to include those other 2 CDs, with the "Hussite Overture" and with the very real expectation that the regrettable sidebreaks would not have occurred! This is reason enough for me to give this release only 4 stars. And it is a shame because it needn't have been that way!
There is every appearance that Ivan Fischer (interestingly, another Hungarian and not a Czech) is in the process of doing his own (and very new) traversal of these works, with the Budapest Festival Orchestra and on the Philips label. The little I've heard has me very excited. But Fischer does not "put Kertész in the shade." And the price is considerably higher.
Aside from the aforementioned nits about saving a disc or two and its side effects, I doubt very much that you'd be disappointed in this bargain boxed set.
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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fresh ears, 24 Sep 2004
By 
P. SIMPSON "nucaleena" (North Yorkshire, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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I neither want nor need to add anything about these performances, - the other reviewers are spot on, - they are simply wonderful, life affirming, even. What i would like to comment on is the sound. This is a forty year old set, and had always sounded good. Recently, however, I upgraded from my beloved Castle Howard S3s and Nakamichi amp to Quad ESL63s with twin valve amps and new valve pre-amp. So, as you can imagine, I've been rummaging through my collection, hearing everything afresh. And the amazing discoveries? Several, but this is among the happiest. This forty year old sound is fresh as a daisy, - it has been superbly re-mastered from superb masters and sounds, well, superb. So don't just think you're getting one of the gramophone's most precious performances, you're also getting sound better than you could possibly have expected.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Have for any music-lover, 9 Feb 2002
This set was one of the first things I bought when I started collecting records in 1970. It was the time when Branson was starting out as a mail-order record retailer.
Everybody knows the "New World", but the familiarity diminishes as one travels backwards through Dvorak's symphonic oeuvre. It is fair to say that the first couple of CDs in this set will rarely leave the sleeve. However, from Number 5 onwards you will play them to death.
The Kertesz "New World" is the one by which others are measured. He is content to allow the music to flow by itself, and it is all the better for it. No over-egging the orchestral pudding here. However, the highlight is Symphony 8. This is a cracking work which deserves much more frequent programming in concert halls. It receives a magisterial performance at the hands of Kertesz. Particularly delightful is the light and tripping way he has with the coda to the third movement, which everybody else seems to plod. Symphony 7 was a re-write of Brahms 3, much as Schubert 9 was a re-write of Beethoven 7. Kertesz was good at Brahms too, he had a reputable set of four out from Decca at the time. He is the finest possible advocate of this lyrical Symphony. Numbers 5 and 6 are not consistently fine all through, but each has the odd superb mevement making them well worth listening to occasionally, especially when played as well as this.
We lost Kertesz tragically young. He would without doubt have gone on to greater things.
A final word about the sound quality. This dates from the era when Decca bankrupted the company in the pursuit of technically perfect classical recordings, most of which never sold enough copies to repay the cost of production. It was just about as good as analogue sound ever got. As an example, listen to the second movement of the "New World", pay attention to the orchestral background and notice the little motif which passes from instrument to instrument and follow it around in space until it ends at centre-rear on the tympani.
Dvorak was one of the great Classical tunesmiths. This music overflows with wonderful tunes. At the hands of Kertesz and his LSO players it receives outstanding treatment. The Decca engineers captured it perfectly. The CD transfers are first class. Who could ask for anything more?
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magical, 13 Feb 2009
By 
Playing: superb. Interpretations: glorious. The works themselves: magical (even the overlong First symphony - but the melting Third? Who could resist that? It is quite unfair to single out the Fifth as the first of the great symphonies). In short, a classic set and at this price - or any for that matter - unbeatable. Have absolutely no worries that the set is forty years old - it sounds like it was recorded yesterday (but in Decca's glory days).
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Dvorak performances, 3 Aug 2010
By 
enthusiast "enthusiast" (sussex, uk) - See all my reviews
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This is a truly excellent set. It is filled with magic.

Even today it is customary to be grudging in our appreciation of Dvorak. Yet the last six of his symphonies are masterpieces - yes, even the fourth, for all it's unashamed cribbing from Wagner. The first three symphonies may be a little less worthy but they are accomplished works that regularly hint at, and occasionally achieve (the slow movement of #2, for example), greatness.

Kertesz plays all with total commitment and is a powerful advocate. But he is very frequently much more than just that. His affectionate approach to this music pays great dividends. but he also often injects considerable power and excitement and he seems to have an unparalleled understanding of Dvorak's complex "Czech" rhythms. His 4th and 5th are wonderful performances. His 6th is powerful and thrilling. His 7th and 8th are the equal of - albeit very different from - the best in the catalogue - Davis, for example in #7 and Kubelik in #8 ... and this is high praise indeed. The 8th especially is an extraordinarily successful performance of great power and subtlety. His New World is, for me, something even more special: Kertesz "loves the piece into life", bringing out a special magic in the process ... he is slow in parts, tender, but he never loses track of its pulse, its ebb and flow. And, as with all the performances grandeur and excitement are there too when needed.

Many of these performances have been amongst the main recommendations for these works on an individual level (i.e. not only as a set) for forty years! Kertesz may have died young but on this showing his work achieved an extraordinary maturity. The fill-ups are more than fill ups - each is an excellent and enjoyable piece and each is given a cracker of a performance. The sound is very good.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A splendid achievement even after all these years, 6 April 2014
I have collected these readings on separate CDs over the years, but I would have no hesitation in buying the complete set in this bargain release. The merits of this cycle are well known. Kertesz brings a remarkable sense of fresh discovery to each symphony, with performances that sound so naturally beautiful both as interpretations and orchestral performances. Kertesz and the LSO are in world beating form and Decca provided superb engineering which has been sensitively transferred to CD.

The Kertesz early symphonies are the finest I've come across. 4, 5 and 6 are exceptional readings and most certainly head the list for me in these works even after all these years. There are several very fine single disc alternatives of the 7th on disc that have more intensity about them than the Kertesz reading and yet it is still a very satisfying reading and although the Kertesz 8th has special qualities and remains memorable there are rival single discs on more modern recordings that are equally powerful.

The cycle is crowned by one of the very finest readings of the 9th ever recorded; powerfully dramatic and beautifully played. It is a towering interpretation that dominates the list of recommended recordings with good reason. this remains a hard cycle to match let alone beat. This is what records are meant for. Sit back and enjoy!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The one to have, 9 Aug 2012
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Mr. Christopher Harris "Chris in Brum" (Birmingham UK) - See all my reviews
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I'm really just echoing the other reviewers. These are great interpretations of lovely music, superb playing by the LSO and wonderful conducting by Kertesz. I listened to the 8th this morning on my new hifi and the recording is just top notch. As a set this is a great bargain, every music lover should have it.
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0 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Sent wrong disK, 16 May 2012
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I discovered I was sent two copies of Disk 5 and no Disk 6 with Symphony 9 on. I returned it without any fuss from Amazon and got a proper replacement in a couplke of days.
I love the symphonies and would give the second transaction 5 stars.
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