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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not quite as unknown a concept as MacArthur lets on.
I just finished reading this book, which deals with a relationship that is often under-emphasised or misunderstood: the one between believers as slaves and Christ as our master. John MacArthur suggests that this truth has been covered up by our English Bibles, using words such as 'servant' instead of 'slave' and wrote the book to explain the real meaning of slave and what...
Published on 6 May 2011 by Anna J Lambert

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1.0 out of 5 stars Based on heretical sources
If you research the endnotes in John MacArthur’s book, Slave, you will find that most of them reference the heretical works of Gnostic, modernist and postmodern scholars who deny the fundamental doctrines of the Christian faith. Many of these scholars are rabidly anti-Christian and their works, which MacArthur recommends as authoritative, are filled with slander and...
Published 2 months ago by Watch & Pray


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1.0 out of 5 stars Based on heretical sources, 6 Mar. 2015
If you research the endnotes in John MacArthur’s book, Slave, you will find that most of them reference the heretical works of Gnostic, modernist and postmodern scholars who deny the fundamental doctrines of the Christian faith. Many of these scholars are rabidly anti-Christian and their works, which MacArthur recommends as authoritative, are filled with slander and blasphemy of the Lord Jesus Christ.

For example, John MacArthur favorably references Dale B. Martin’s book, Slavery as Salvation, on page 38 because it likens the Christian life to the abusive institution of slavery in the Roman Empire. Dale B. Martin is Professor of Religious Studies at Yale University, an admitted homosexual and author of a blasphemous book titled Sex and the Single Savior which portrays Jesus as a homosexual. John MacArthur never discloses Prof. Martin’s true identity in Slave.

Another scholar whose translation of Gnostic writings is recommended by MacArthur is Bart D. Ehrman, Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Prof. Ehrman is a New Testament critic who claims that he was an evangelical Christian until he discovered “errors” in the Bible. Dr. Ehrman now writes books which debunk the New Testament and advocate for Gnostic forgeries such as the Gospel of Thomas and the Lost Gospel of Judas Iscariot to replace the New Testament canon.

Slave is a best-seller among young Christians who are led to believe that the sources referenced therein are Christian books, or at least neutral historical sources. Theological heretics Dale Martin and Bart Ehrman are only two of many academics of the “Jesus Seminar” variety whose scholarship is recommended without an honest identification or disclaimer to warn the reader. By concealing the identity and agenda of his sources, John MacArthur is deceptively promoting Gnostic books and the Gnostic heresy to many young Christians who are not yet established in the faith.

For documentation and detailed information on the heretical sources in Slave, see the following review:

http://watch-unto-prayer.org/macarthur-2-slave-book.html
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not quite as unknown a concept as MacArthur lets on., 6 May 2011
I just finished reading this book, which deals with a relationship that is often under-emphasised or misunderstood: the one between believers as slaves and Christ as our master. John MacArthur suggests that this truth has been covered up by our English Bibles, using words such as 'servant' instead of 'slave' and wrote the book to explain the real meaning of slave and what our role is as such. Belonging to Christ in this way is a biblical command, and an important facet of our relationship with God. MacArthur explains this biblically and clearly and reminds us that being the slave of a perfect master is in fact totally freeing.
This was not a new concept to me, the word doulos has been explained to me before, but MacArthur has some refreshing reminders and some encouraging and very challenging examples scattered about this book. It is very easy to read and quite short, but made me think about just how seriously I (don't) take obeying God. It was also hugely helpful to be reminded of my position as a slave, in that my owner who gives me my name imposes my very identity. I have been bought with a price from the sin I was enslaved to. Because slavery has been abolished in this country for a number of years now, all the truths that were conveyed by such a term are lost on this generation. Though a little repetitive at first, the book then develops and expands well on many areas of the relationship we have with God, our Lord (this name alone clearly acknowledges His as sole master and owner). I would recommend this book - it puts you back in your place, reminding you that though you are God's child (and thus extremely precious and unique) you are also His slave (and thus completely expected to do just as He asks without expectations or desire for reward).

*I was provided this book for free through the Thomas Nelson BookSneeze Program in exchange for my unbiased review.
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