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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding British film making
What a shame this film did not enjoy more success at the box-office. Beautifully observed period drama ( yes, this genre can stretch outside bodices and bodkins )with wit, satire, social commentary, great acting and a nicely-turned plot. It's also fascinating that such an important story has never been filmed before, neither as 'fiction' like this nor as documentary. It...
Published on 2 May 2011 by EZ Duzzit

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK
The film is entertaining enough, but loses much from the focus on fictional individuals who perhaps inevitably end up as stereotypes. The background period setting comes across well; I lived in east London at the time and in brought back many memories. However, the politics - which ought to be in the foreground - suffers both from trying to present it through the medium...
Published on 3 July 2011 by Graham R. Hill


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Leave it out mate, 16 Mar 2013
This review is from: Made In Dagenham [DVD] (DVD)
A good and interesting true story ruined by the most ridiculous cod-acting and stupid caricatures imaginable. All the working class are rough diamonds while all the management are Eton toffs. What a waste. If you've ever wondered why Britain has been ruined by the class war, and our perceptions of it, look no further than this film. Shame, a wasted opportunity to educate and entertain.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great songs, 19 Jan 2013
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This review is from: Made In Dagenham (Audio CD)
I love the music on this DVD it takes me bak to my era of music and I was an Extra in the film so it means a lot to me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Wasn't impressed, 1 Nov 2012
By 
L. Mcseveney (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Made In Dagenham [DVD] (DVD)
Thought this would be a really good film, loved the idea of the story especially as my nan told me stories from when it was happening as she'd followed it in the news etc, but didn't really live upto the hype.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good film, 19 Feb 2012
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This review is from: Made In Dagenham [DVD] (DVD)
I enjoyed the film a lot. I watched it with my mum and we both found it entertaining and eye-opening, although my mum can remember these times and how tough it was on women in the work place! It is both funny and serious. Sally Hawkins played a blinder in the lead role. I would definitely recommend this DVD to all women. It just shows, although we have further to go still in terms of equality in practically all areas of employment, we have, thankfully, come a long way.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best of British, 23 Jun 2011
By 
Megman "Megman" (Lincoln, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Made In Dagenham [DVD] (DVD)
An inspirational and light-hearted account of the events in 1968, that eventually lead to the start of equal pay for women.

It has its' darker moments when the men at the Ford plant are forced out on strike because of the women's actions and lighter moments when the mangers realised that the women won't be a push-over.

A strong cast and good writing make this a easy to watch film, with good performances from Bob Hoskins, Sally Hawkins and Miranda Richardson as the indomitable Barbara Castle.
Once again, a good example of the excellent films that the British film industry is reputed for producing.
Made In Dagenham [DVD]
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sublime Sandie!, 24 Oct 2010
By 
Brian Johnson "brianj748" (Christchurch, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Made In Dagenham (Audio CD)
The CD is worth buying just for the new Sandie Shaw track, 'Made In Dagenham'.Shame that it hasn't been released as a single I think. Another good track is the Mama Cass's 'It's getting Better' which is lovely. It would have been good to have a better track from Dusty Springfield than the one on here. Really, Sandie Shaw with a new track which is very good make it worthwhile.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Shaw Thing, 10 Oct 2010
This review is from: Made In Dagenham (Audio CD)
These songs work brilliantly in the film and really help capture the spirit of the time. The new Sandie Shaw track is just great and blends in well with the 60's tracks, but still manages to feel current. The lyrics were written by Billy Bragg who is surely one of Britain's best songwriters and is more than qualified to write about a historical industrial relations event in Essex! It would have been good to have the option to buy or download this track separately for those who already have or don't want the rest of the tracks.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Employment Lawyer View; Great Film; Mixed Results of Law, 13 Mar 2011
By 
Legal Vampire (Buckinghamshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Made In Dagenham [DVD] (DVD)
The first part of this review is about why this is such a great film to see, and if you only want to read that part, that's fine; the second part (only for anyone interested) is about Equal Pay Law and its effects

The 2010 British film `Made in Dagenham', about the unlikely subject of the origins of the Equal Pay Act 1970, is in the same genre as `Billy Elliott', `The Full Monty' and `Brassed Off', and is as good as any of these.

Based on a true story from 1968, `Made in Dagenham' stars Sally Hawkins, an actress surely destined for fame, as a machinist stitching seat covers for Ford Cortinas at the vast Dagenham car plant in Essex. Bob Hoskins plays the shop steward. Also good is Jaime Winstone in a supporting role as a machinist with ambitions to become a model.

The law then still allowed employers openly to pay women lower rates of pay than men doing the same job.

The film dramatises a strike against this by 187 women machinists who temporarily shut down the then biggest car plant in Europe. The machinists are not just up against their British management and Henry Ford II at Ford Motor Company headquarters in Detroit. More subtle opponents include left-wing union leaders and Labour Party Prime Minster Harold Wilson, who say they sympathise, except that this year `is not the right time', nor is next year ...

`Made in Dagenham differs from `Billy Elliott', `The Full Monty' and `Brassed Off' in reminding us that working class life, and `gritty realism' do not just happen in the North of England!

It also reminds us that although change was in the air in 1968, for ordinary people it was gradual and not very ideological. Sally Hawkins' character, even in the midst of leading a strike for equal pay, does not doubt that it is her job to wash her husband's shirts, even when he is off-work and at home all day.

The way `Made in Dagenham' is shot manages to make even post-war Tower Blocks look interesting. The theme song is sung by Sandie Shaw, who herself worked at Ford in Dagenham in the sixties before being `discovered' as a pop star of the era.

In the end, the women go back to work in exchange for being paid 92% as much as men (strange to think that that was an achievement) and a promise by the Secretary of State for Employment, Barbara Castle, of what became the Equal Pay Act 1970.

You can enjoy `Made in Dagenham' no matter whether you are left-wing, right-wing or completely non-political.

******

The rest of this review is only for anyone interested in the topic of equal pay for women, on which I comment from my day job as an employment lawyer. If that does not interest you, you can stop reading this now, but I hope I have given you an idea what the film is like and inspired you to see it!

So, the film ends with what seems like a happy ending. But was it?

Even if sometimes striking workers (as in this case) had legitimate grievances, there were so many strikes that the British car industry became notorious in the 1960s and 70s, and Ford began shifting production abroad. Today no cars are made in Dagenham, leaving both male and female workers, equally, unemployed.

The pre-1970 practice of having lower pay for women than men for the same work, now illegal, assumed that all families consisted of husband, wife and children with the husband as the breadwinner. That was not really true even then. Lower pay for women caused hardship for single mothers and their children. It would be untenable in today's world.

Figures quoted vary, but on the last official figures I saw, average pay between men and women in the UK grows closer by half a percent or so every year, but women still earn on average 12% less than men in basic pay, or 20% including overtime and bonuses. Is this an injustice? That may depend on your view of the causes.

Discrimination does still exist, sometimes conscious, but often in unthinking assumptions e.g. assuming that part-time (mostly female) staff may not have career ambitions, and forgetting to consider them for career development opportunities.

However, although some commentators suggest that anything less than complete equality is a scandal, some of the difference is due to career choices that women make e.g. more women than men apply to be nurses, fewer women than men apply to be stockbrokers. If that is their choice, is it a problem at all? That may in turn depend on why more women choose less well paid occupations, and the `nature or nurture' debate.

Likewise even if, as the law will allow from April 2011, mothers and fathers can share parental leave more equally, as long as biology allows only women to be pregnant and give birth, children will continue to be more of a career interruption for women than men.

`Equal Value' Pay Claims - You May not Know what they are, but they certainly Affect Your Council Tax! In 1984, the Equal Pay Act was changed to allow women to bring claims not just for being paid less than male colleagues doing the same job, but for being paid less than male colleagues doing different jobs.

At first, almost no one noticed and nothing happened.

However, from the mid-1990s, solicitors were allowed to advertise, conduct `class actions' and offer `no win, no fee' arrangements. A few firms began advertising for low paid female public sector employees to contact them. The result was an explosion of mass Equal Value claims, some costing local authorities and the National Health Service hundreds of millions of pounds. Even trade unions have been sued.

This is as yet not understood by most people outside the public sector, and poorly explained in press and television news reports.

E.g. a female care assistant can bring a claim because she thinks it unfair that a male gardener is paid more than she is, taking into account skills required, ease of recruitment etc.

However, whether the work of a female care assistant is of "equal value" to that of a male gardener is possibly unanswerable, and in any case in reality decided by the members of an Employment Tribunal, who have probably never done either job, and cannot really know.

In a large organisation, the female care assistant has plenty of people she can compare herself against, so if comparing herself with a gardener does not produce the result she wants, she can compare herself with a maintenance worker, delivery drivver, secuity guard or whoever, until she finds a comparison that allows her to claim she is underpaid.

By law, it is no defence that the claim could drive the employer into bankruptcy.

So far, such claims have mostly hit the public sector which is a soft target. There are often many female workers in the same grade to share the substantial cost of bringing a claim. They can usually identify groups of male workers who are better paid due to benefits won in the past by trade unions. There is little risk that public sector organisations will go bust if they lose a large claim. They can put up taxes or cut services.

Once `Equal Value Claim' lawyers have gone through the public sector, whether they will attack the private sector, and whether the cost will drive some companies abroad or out of business, remains to be seen.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Barely road-worthy, 10 Mar 2013
By 
GlynLuke (York UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Made In Dagenham [DVD] (DVD)
My two stars are for some of the performances, the story the film attempts to tell, and the gravitas West Wing actor Richard Schiff attempts to bring to proceedings, though even he can`t save a wreck like this.
But first, the good news.
Sally Hawkins deserves a medal for helming this real-life tale of the 1968 women`s strike at the Dagenham Ford factory with, against the odds, a performance of subtlety and credibility. Daniel Mays, a baby-faced actor who`ll never be out of work, is excellent too as her husband. Kenneth Cranham, who now seems to be British film and TV`s go-to guy for ageing stuffed-shirt stubbornness, is suitably stolid as a union official, and good old Bob Hoskins copes valiantly with some stilted dialogue and a character so saintly it beggars belief.
The great Andrea Riseborough, whose star has risen dramatically in recent years, is funny and very good as the cheerfully tarty one, Geraldine James does her gutsy, noble thing to predictably efficient effect, while Roger Lloyd Pack shines briefly as her sad husband.
Miranda Richardson - whom I`d watch doing almost anything - has a ball as Barbara Castle, nailing the steely voice, though even she veers towards caricature at times, for which I blame not her but the clunking script and clunkier direction. (Was it directed, or did they just tell them to get on with it and point a few cameras at them?) John Sessions, a superb mimic and no slouch as an actor either, is curiously muted as Harold Wilson, not even quite getting the voice right.
The usually reliable Rupert Graves gives one of the least convincing performances of his career as a Ford manager, and the delightful, witty Rosamund Pike is allowed a few good scenes as his posh wife - but all of the above are battling against some of the most unnatural lines any actors have been given to say since the last Willy Russell script.
This farrago is in an all too obvious line that includes Calendar Girls (by the same director, Nigel Cole, who seems to make a habit of getting actresses to remove their clothes), The Full Monty, Brassed Off, and other quintessentially English films. It`s a lot less convincing than the last two, which were well scripted and acted, and packed a real punch backed up by a fascinating story.
This was a good choice of subject, and was a real piece of history which deserved telling, but the film`s makers did the Ford women few favours by over-simplifying character, incident, and story. Most of the key moments are telegraphed so clearly one can predict them a mile off, and the stock characters could have come from a panto or a soap.
Some good performances - in particular Hawkins and Riseborough - let down by some typically `English` filmmaking. A country that produced Hitchcock, Powell & Pressburger, Derek Jarman and Mike Leigh should by now have learnt a few lessons from such distinctive masters.
A film full of good intentions - which seldom makes for good cinema.
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Heroines of Their Age, 18 Nov 2010
By 
H. meiehofer "haroldm" (glasgow, scotland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Made In Dagenham [DVD] (DVD)
Made in Dagenham follows a well trodden path for British films being the story of a small bunch of people (in this case crucuially, women) who stand up against a system, whilst all around then to seem to think their struggle is futile. As such it can be compared to classics such as "The Full Monty" or dare I say it, "Passport to Pimlico".

Now whilst this film is clearly not in the same class it is nonetheless a good, solid, engaging piece of work. The story follows the female workers in Ford Dagenham who struck to get equal pay with the men. They are dismissed not only by their bosses but also not really well supported by their own trade union. It may seem farcical now, but there really was such a dismissive attitde towards this issue at the time. Some of the male characters seem almost like caricatures representing stereotypical sexism, but I am quite sure that in real life they were just that bad.

The cast are absolutely excellent, although the plot could have been a bit stronger. The period feel is particularly well done and it is pleasing to see a story centred around working class struggle. But don't run away; this is not all serious. There are plenty of laughs,and a fewsad bits along the way.

The device at the end where the real heroines recount their story may be a wee bit cliched these days, but in this context it does work particularly well.

This is a good film celebrating the heroism of a bunch of women who in their own way are just as historically significant as the suffragettes.
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Made In Dagenham [DVD]
Made In Dagenham [DVD] by Nigel Cole (DVD - 2011)
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