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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Horror Story
The title was the first thing to catch my eye then I bought it, well got it for free. Absolutely brilliant horror story very much like Guy N Smith. Having visited the Lake District on reading this book I could image myself there, brilliantly well written from page 1. Has me thinking this could really happen at some time.
Published on 11 Mar 2012 by Wendy

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3.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable throwback
The book sells itself as an homage to the work of Guy N Smith and doesn't disappoint. It takes a little while to get going but is readable throughout and when it gets into gear the gore comes thick and fast. It is if course completely unbelievable and ridiculous from start to finish but that's half the fun. If you miss the lurid horror paperbacks that filled the racks of...
Published 23 months ago by Oliver Clarke "whatmeworry...


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Horror Story, 11 Mar 2012
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This review is from: Giant Killer Eels (Kindle Edition)
The title was the first thing to catch my eye then I bought it, well got it for free. Absolutely brilliant horror story very much like Guy N Smith. Having visited the Lake District on reading this book I could image myself there, brilliantly well written from page 1. Has me thinking this could really happen at some time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Giant Killer Eels, 2 April 2011
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Kindle Customer (Sheffield, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Giant Killer Eels (Kindle Edition)
This story, set in the Lake District is very reminiscent of the works of the types of books being written by the likes of Guy N Smith and James Herbert in the early 80's. Which is a good thing - it reads at a cracking pace and you don't get to stop for breath til you reach the last page.
The Giant Killer Eels of the title are a great horror creation and even if, at any time, you actually stop and think "is ths actually possible" it doesn't matter because the author makes you believe in it.
I was reminded by this book of James Herberts 'Rats' series and hope this will be as succesful.
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4.0 out of 5 stars good read, 26 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Giant Killer Eels (Kindle Edition)
I liked this book, it is well written. Much better than some others i have read. I especially liked that it is set in the Lake district.
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3.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable throwback, 14 Aug 2012
This review is from: Giant Killer Eels (Kindle Edition)
The book sells itself as an homage to the work of Guy N Smith and doesn't disappoint. It takes a little while to get going but is readable throughout and when it gets into gear the gore comes thick and fast. It is if course completely unbelievable and ridiculous from start to finish but that's half the fun. If you miss the lurid horror paperbacks that filled the racks of your local newsagent's in the 80s then give it a go.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Giant Killer Eels! What more could you want?, 15 July 2012
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This review is from: Giant Killer Eels (Kindle Edition)
We've had crabs, rats, cats, bats, dogs, spiders, scorpions, slugs, snakes, insects of all description, various pike, piranha and perch, alligators, jellyfish, frogs, worms, birds, babies and budgies [to name but a few]. Yes, hooray, its the Nature's Revenge novel, the Animals On The Attack books that I so loved as a teenager. And, er, still do now.

Clearly an affectionate parody and tribute to Guy N.Smith and his ilk, Stuart Neild has somehow found a gap in the market with his GIANT KILLER EELS.

Yanick, an eccentric, and Neilds most interesting character, is studying eels and investigating the legends of Old Slippery, a giant eel that is said to inhabit Lake Windermere. He makes friends with two teenage lads who have absconded to also look into the tales of the giant eel. They all picked the wrong weekend, though, because during a fierce storm, huge amounts of increasingly large eels emerge from an underground river system and start lunching on locals and tourists alike. Towards the end of the book, some of the creatures are as big as a house and smashing up boats and houses with reckless abandon. Indeed, the finale is a crescendo of eely mayhem, as the ginormous creatures chuck tanks and helicopters about, and in the time-honoured tradition, an exciting sequel is heavily hinted at.

Much like NIGHT OF THE CRABS or BATS OUT OF HELL, this short novel is all story, all action, and moves at a very fast pace, with a near-apocalyptic and memorable ending, and is a great easy read for the many fans of this genre. It evokes memories of Guy N Smith and other creature-carnage authors admiarably, and perhaps surpasses some of them in the action stakes. I have read many of this type of book, and GIANT KILLER EELS fits in gloriously, and is much better than some.

However, EELS needs an edit, a polish. It is of a professional-standard in story and execution, but it comes across as a first or second draft. Two of the main characters, the teenage eel-hunters, seemed to me to be interchangeable, and other characters' names occasionally changed. There are a stream of misplaced words, [`sought' for `sort' etc] throughout, especially towards the end, the kind that a spellchecker would let pass, and these errors jarred the flow for me and threw me out of the action a bit. Neild can clearly write, and has an obvious passion for the genre, which comes across contagiously, but in my humble opinion this could certainly do with a nice shiny finish.

This was my first proper read on the Kindle, and I think that this sort of thing is perfect for it. The internet and the Kindle has revolutionised reading and writing, and has given us the means to choose to read in any particular subgenre we could wish, without the need of a publishing house to decide what is popular. As a first read on Kindle, I couldn't have picked a much better book than GIANT KILLER EELS to demonstrate the diversity and talent that makes up modern e-publishing. Well done, Mr. Neild, and I look forward to the sequel.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Stuart Neild - the new John Halkin?, 29 Jun 2012
By 
N. Burton (England, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Giant Killer Eels (Kindle Edition)
If you had found this book on one of those revolving paperback stands every newsagent seemed to have back in the 1970s, the sub-deck beneath the main title would have read "In the tradition of Night of the Crabs and The Rats..."
An affection throwback to the days of the Nasty NELs, the Sordid Spheres and the Petrifying Pans, Giant Killer Eels owes a debt of thanks to James Herbert, Guy N Smith and, most of all, John Halkin.
If there's one book this "nature strikes back" chiller reminded me of, it was Halkin's creepy crawly thriller Bloodworm. Only where Halkin's killer worms grew to the size of a python, Stuart Neild's eels are bigger than a house.
The book sticks closely to the book nasty template - introducing us to a cast of characters (two teenage boys looking for adventure, a couple trying to keep their relationship together, a crazy man who lives in the woods etc) before the monsters appear. From then on, it's a case of who will survive and what will be left?
Giant Killer Eels gave me a warm glow of nostalgia for long hot summers and paperbacks with lurid titles like Squelch, Squirm and Slime.
The giant eels live beneath the Lake District in a subterranean river system. What makes them suddenly emerge and go on a killing spree isn't really explained (other than it happens during an apocalyptic storm). As with all good pulp horror, the story is nothing without the reader's willing suspension of disbelief because there are some plot holes (why did no one notice them before? what did they eat? why can't the Army kill them when a farmer can blast one to bits with a shotgun etc).
Although the story is set in the present day - there's a reference to mobile phones and, in a piece of postmodernism, one of the characters suggests the eels are "like something from one of those Guy N Smith novels his dad used to read" - it could just as easily be the summer of '76.
The manuscript could do with the attentions of a decent proof reader but the odd typo is easy to overlook when you're racing through the chapters and having such a ball.
To be honest, none of this nit-picking matters.
What does is that Giant Killer Eels is a roller-coaster of a story set in one of the most picturesque areas of England. It doesn't outstay its welcome and it sets the story up nicely for a sequel. How about it Mr Neild?
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Giant Killer Eels by Stuart Neild
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