Customer Reviews


26 Reviews
5 star:
 (12)
4 star:
 (9)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lightweight, enjoyable romp.
Little's book lives up to its name - he is indeed a tourist in all the forays he makes into the strange and wonderful world of prognostication. Travelling with him is very entertaining, but often somewhat frustrating. This is more of a taster of the theories, both strange and downright ridiculous, for psychic abilities. Although Little comes to his own concrete...
Published on 8 May 2012 by tiggrie AKA Sarah

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars I knew it would be ok
Intriguing still leaves the debate wide open. It's surprising the amount of doubt in all aspects of this questionable field.
Published 13 months ago by dashcroft


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lightweight, enjoyable romp., 8 May 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Psychic Tourist: A Voyage into the Curious World of Predicting the Future (Kindle Edition)
Little's book lives up to its name - he is indeed a tourist in all the forays he makes into the strange and wonderful world of prognostication. Travelling with him is very entertaining, but often somewhat frustrating. This is more of a taster of the theories, both strange and downright ridiculous, for psychic abilities. Although Little comes to his own concrete conclusion, it's a little dissatisfying (if you'll excuse the pun!) and anti-climactic. His end point is not all that different to his starting point and, crucially, how he got there is not particularly compelling. Basically, he's unlikely to convince an undecided reader to his point of view if they're not already halfway there.

That said, as entertainment, and as an introduction to the arguments and counter-arguments for psi, ESP, or psychic abilities, this is a very enjoyable romp through some of the ideas out there, and a starting point for anyone who's interested in reading more about some of the theories. It's also fascinating to see how, even for those who profess not to put any faith in, for example, horoscopes, can find themselves being swayed and making decisions based on the things they don't think they believe in.

For those who just want a good read, without worrying too much about the depth of research or the validity of any particular conclusion, this has good entertainment value.

Overall, a fun ride that is reasonably informative and often rather funny, and you might even learn a thing or two and be made to think along the way.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The future's bright, the future's...?, 26 Jan 2010
This is a great book. I was entertained and informed in equal measure about everything from the science of looking into the future to the history of witches. The story of the scientist making the time machine was fascinating and moving. I also didn't realise that Darwin's co-founder of Natural Selection Albert Russell Wallace researched the power of psychics in the 19th century - who'd have thought it. It was a real page turner too. I couldn't wait to find out what happened next on the author's quest. Thoroughly enjoyed the trip.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seriously good read, 30 Jan 2010
I don't buy books by psychics, but this book intrigued me because it wanted to get at the truth in an open-minded way. It leaves no stone unturned and reveals not only what psychics etc think, but what the latest experiments and science shows as well. But he tells his story in a compelling and fascinating way - it's all very easy to take in. He is also interested in the people behind the predictions and so you feel you gain a lot of insight about their beliefs as well. William Little being tested by a scientist's precognition machine to see whether he could see into the future was just one of the highlights for me as well as him attempting to contact the dead with a coven of witches after midnight at halloween - unmissable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read, 7 Feb 2010
Brilliant book, keeps you spell bound and can't wait to get to the next chapter. Best book I've read that looks into this area. Genuinely open minded, but intelligent and entertaining.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reading till late..., 26 Jan 2010
Would recommend this to anyone would wants a thoughtful and entertaining read. Well paced and well written. It's the first book in a long time that I've read that made me stay up late until I finished it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 17 May 2009
By 
Great fun - in the vein of Louis Theroux and Will Storr. Loved every page. Will little has a really easy way of writing that takes you on a brilliant journey through the crystal ball, without leaving your armchair!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Is there anybody there?, 26 Jan 2010
William Little takes us on a journey to test mediumship, witchcraft,fortune telling and astrology. He contacts three well known psychics. One of them is a well known ( and VERY expensive) American psychic who has written several books. The other two are British psychics. Both have written autobiographies, and appear on TV. He visits their "road shows" and interviews them, so we get a much larger picture than just reading their books and seeing the edited versions of their shows on TV. The astrologer he visits has a daily column in a national newspaper. He visits a modern gypsy fortune teller who has ditched her traditional caravan for health and safety reasons.I think that there is something in this book for everyone- from total unbelievers in anything supernatural to people-like me- who have an open mind. William Little decides that we make our own future, but you will need to read the book to find out if you agree with him.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Unpsychic Sleuth, 5 Oct 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Journalist William Little's journey "The Psychic Tourist" begins when he pays for his sister and niece to have their full astrology charts done. Both charts revealed that their deaths would be connected in some way to water - ever since neither of them have dared travel across it.

Frustrated by the power the predictions had on his family, Little heads off to meet a whole range of psychics, from tarot readers and gypsy fortune-tellers to famous psychic Sylvia Browne. Her customers have spent thousands of dollars and travelled huge distances for such a private sitting (and he is amazed by the trivia they ask when they finally get there: "can you tell me if the guy who hasn't called me back has still got my number?"). For good measure Little balances this off by discussing psi with quantum physicists and famous skeptic Richard Wiseman.

I found the Gardnerian coven weekend an interesting chapter. Understandably Little wasn't allowed in to watch the initiation ceremonies, but was allowed to participate in the coven's private Samhain ritual ("and Ghost Hunt"). For initiated Gardnerians it did strike me as a little odd that they invited a national newspaper journalist to stay with them for a weekend and participate in a usually-private Sabbat.(One of them petitions him not to make them look like twits in his book - unfortunately for neopagans worldwide this is pretty much exactly what happens).

After each chapter Little notes down the predictions made for him by the particular person or group he's interviewed. At the end Little manages to track down the individual guy who made the chart for his sister and niece, and confronts him with it.

Whether you believe that if he didn't want to know he shouldn't have asked, or that it's all a load of baloney, it's a really engaging read and also raises some good moral questions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining but as flawed as the psychics he is debunking., 1 Jan 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is an enjoyable and entertaining read. It was also very funny (sometimes for the wrong reasons!) and raised some important issues about the psychic business - and it is a very big business. It does therefore need educated, detailed and thorough critical analysis. You will not find this in this book however. Some of the coverage of the types of fortune telling practiced is far too brief, but I'll let that go as he does describe himself as a tourist and tourists rarely spend long enough in one place to get a real, detailed view. I loved his descriptions of encounters with some of the biggest in the business - Sylvia Browne and Sally Morgan are portrayed as warm, caring and nice individuals. It is clear why they are both so popular. The `debunking' of Christine Holohan's involvement in the solving of Jackie Poole's murder is very well done and exposes the risks of relying on one source or accepting media stories uncritically. However, Little is far too overawed by the `big hitters' in the sceptics' corner. He accepts everything that they say uncritically simply because of their position. This is a huge mistake and badly damages his credibility. After all he has spent the previous 150 pages warning against accepting what people say just because they seem trustworthy and decent! Although Richard Dawkins and Derren Brown both came over quite well, thoughtful, reasonable and measured in their responses. Colin Blakemore's statements are accepted uncritically; he states that 'the brain ....isn't very efficient, struggling with the small amount of energy the body gives it'. Now, I know that he is an eminent neuroscientist, and must assume that he has been badly represented as the evidence shows quite the contrary that the brain takes @25% of all available energy! As it is a single organ out of 22 major internal organs and 11 organ systems (Off the top of my head) this quite an allocation! Blakemore uses these statements to argue that the majority of our perceptions are 'made up' and then supports this with the argument that because we have difficulty recalling everything we 'saw' we must have made it all up! I'm sorry but I cannot let this one pass either. There are literally thousands of studies showing that we only recall some of what we actually, really perceived. For example studies of the recall of strings of digits show that we have limited capacity to remember them - but this does not mean that we made up what we read initially!! People will admit to not remembering and may make mistakes in recall, but this is not at all the same as making things up! To characterise human perception of our surroundings as 'taking a few snap shots here and there' which are the words that Little puts in Blakemore's mouth is, I would hope, another misrepresentation. This explanation of perception as based on hypothesis testing is still disputed and cannot be accepted as fact. Gibson's ecological theory of perception argues the contrary that there is enough information for the person to perceive accurately and effectively without `making things up'. It should also be noted that the kind of studies that neuroscientists rely on to draw these conclusions are frequently lacking in validity as representations of real tasks in real life. The way that the brain behaves in a lab with goggles on or in a scanner looking at flashing images is simply not necessarily the way that brains behave in real life watching Aunt Violet sip her tea and trying to predict who will take the last biscuit! As for Little's conclusion that the brain works 'like a malfunctioning computer' and is 'drip-feeding us false ideas to protect us from anxiety' this is lacking any empirical evidence, based on a terribly limited knowledge of neuroscience, involves cherry picking of statements and (I hope) misremembering what he has been told. Ironically this is what sceptics like Little accuse those who believe in psychic ability of doing! Finally, Little states that Soal's work is evidence for the non-existence of psychic ability. This is incorrect and ignores the basic scientific premise of testing hypotheses. Soal's flawed data and the studies so far don't prove that psychic ability does not exist. They have only shown a lack of evidence so far. You cannot prove non-existence. If as a student he had submitted a couple of these chapters as essays to me I would have scored it through with red pen, told him to substantiate the claims made and to make sure that he was not misrepresenting the sources that he does use. Read it for fun only.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Like Richard Dawkins, I have an open mind., 11 Mar 2010
By 
Mr. P. Holt "Phillip Holt" (I travel the world) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
In this well researched and written book, William Little sets out to discover the truth of whether there is proof of the existence of psychic powers, fortune tellers, mind-reading, after he gave his sister a birth chart by an astrologer, which changed the beliefs of his sister and niece thinking they would die in water.

His journey takes him into a dark haunted wood with a witches' coven, having a fresh understanding of the thoughts of Richard Dawkins, talking to psychics such as Sylvia Brown and Sally Morgan, the psychological showman, hypnotist and magician Darren Brown, and the psychic spy Joe McMoneagle. He visits Dean Radin at the Noetic Institute of Sciences in Petaluma, California, looking into quantum physics and entanglement theory, plus many more well know psychics, all in his quest to discover if psychic powers can be proven.

He comes to a conclusion which he tries to sell to his sister, but is psychic behaviour and belief in every human being?

Perhaps we should be as he found after interviewing Richard Dawkins, open minded, even in the light of evidence to the contrary.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews