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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars James Herbert's Best
For me, this is my favourite James Herbert book and I can quite happily read it in one sitting.

Relentless and powerful, the story grips from the first page and simply does not stop taking the reader along on a roller coaster of a journey through a horribly decimated London in an alternate 1948 (hence the title).

The characters are well defined and...
Published on 23 May 2006 by graciemg

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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK, But Not His Best
I enjoy reading ghost stories, and have found many of this author's novels to be very good such as, The Secret Of Crickley Hall, The Fog etc.

In this one, Psychic Investigator David Ash, is sent to the small, isolated village of Sleath, where there has been a number of strange events, that have unnerved some of the locals.

I found this book a...
Published on 30 Jan 2009 by J.Flood


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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars James Herbert's Best, 23 May 2006
This review is from: '48 (Paperback)
For me, this is my favourite James Herbert book and I can quite happily read it in one sitting.

Relentless and powerful, the story grips from the first page and simply does not stop taking the reader along on a roller coaster of a journey through a horribly decimated London in an alternate 1948 (hence the title).

The characters are well defined and well written, you will warm to some and hate others and be surprised at how events twist and turn throughout.

Simply amazing.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Become a film director., 23 May 2007
By 
@GeekZilla9000 "I am completely operational a... (Doncaster, Yorkshire, UK.) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: '48 (Paperback)
A few years ago I was in hospital, and I'd started getting into James Herbert. My fiancée started this book but didn't like it - and passed it onto me.

I was gripped.

When I think back to this I sometimes think I saw the film of it - the book is written in such a way that the images are so vivid in your head. I feel like I directed a film with unlimited budget. Read this book and watch your version of the film.

People have made parallels between this and the film 28 days later, I'm a fan of 28 Days Later (and Day of the Triffids which it is very much based on) and I can see the similarities - but these are very much independent pieces of work.

This is my favourite James Herbert novel, I love it when you get a book you feel desperate to return to - this was one of those. The evil borne out of desperation of the twisted Fascists whose perverted logic drives them to seek out the survivors.

A great alternate history, and one which seems more plausible as the years roll by. This is frenetic and has one of the best endings to a book ever.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars James Herbert, top of my reading list., 20 Dec 2002
By 
Isen (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: '48 (Paperback)
This book to me was another great James Herbert story. I've read a few of his books and this one was just as good as the rest. I like the post apocolypse scene and the story line that lived within it;
Hitlers last ditch attempt to win the 2nd world war through the use of biological weapons that lay waste to the country that was england. This last ditch weapon that effects certain blood types, corrupting the blood cells and killing the human. We see our hero, one of the few not effected running away from a band of near death citizens who are hunting him down for his blood, so that they can transfuse it into the body of one of their own. Our healthy hero meets up with another group of healthy humans and together, although rather reluctantly, they run together, and in some cases fight together.
I loved the story line and generally loved the book, the only reason I didn't give it 5 *'s was becaus I would have liked it to be a little more horrific, inline with some of James Herberts other books. Well worth adding to your library at home.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My first Herbert novel, and I'm impressed, 18 Dec 2000
By 
S. Howarth "S.S.H." (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: '48 (Paperback)
I am not really a big fan of the Horror genre, but came upon this book in a Supermarket at a price low enough to tempt me. I was prepared to be disappointed but found myself spending every possible minute of the next few days following the exploits of this band of survivors. The combination of pace (it literally starts from the first page and doesn't stop) but incredibly good descriptions that allow your imagination to explode, make this book amazingly enjoyable.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Twice the haunting, 28 Mar 2005
By 
Jane Aland (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Ghosts of Sleath (Paperback)
The Ghosts of Sleath is a first for James Herbert, as while his Rats trilogy was a loosely linked series featuring the same threat over a span of years, this novel marks the first occasion that Herbert has produced a direct sequel to a previous novel continuing the narrative of the lead character, in this instance picking up the story of 'ghost hunter' David Ash three years after the events of Haunted. Haunted is a tough act to follow, being perhaps Herbert's most effective novel, a concise and unsettling ghost story built around a major plot twist. Following the cynical Ash's confrontation with the supernatural in Haunted, there's no real mileage to be had out of the characters 'are they real, are they fake?' debunking of ghosts, so Herbert instead takes the traditional sequel route, with The Ghosts of Sleath expanding the action, so now instead of a haunted house we have an entire haunted village.
The ultimate backstory explanation for the hauntings, with dark family histories and black rites is all pretty standard genre material, as is the ghost climactic revenge on their enemies, but The Ghosts of Sleath remains a fantastic read due to Herbert's storytelling skills. After the misfire of Portent Herbert is back to his best, with a group of vividly drawn characters, evocative writing, and some inventive and gruesome set pieces, with the ghost of a child-abusing parent haunting the ghost of his own dead son being a particularly inspired idea.
At twice the length The Ghosts of Sleath lacks the cutting brevity of Haunted, and feels a little bloated as a result, and while this sequel doesn't quite live up to the original it comes close enough to be a fantastically macabre ghost story, and ranks among Herbert's better novels. Recommended - but do read Haunted first.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars what a fantastic suspense novel!, 21 Feb 2007
By 
This review is from: '48 (Paperback)
This was my very first James Herbert novel and after reading it I was hooked, gagging for more! In this book, Herbert explicitly describes the aftermath of WW2 from the viewpoint of the people in and around London. What you won't find in the history books though is this: After the war was lost to Hitler and his nasty gang of Nazis, they - bad losers that they were - sent planes over to drop some lethal bombs over the city of London. These bombs carried a deadly virus that attacked and after weeks or months eventually killed every human except those with a certain blood group which, unfortunately, happened to be the rarest of them all - "AB". So the few lucky ones with that particular blood group were safe from the virus, though not from the hordes of infected others who'd as a side effect of the virus had become insane, and relentlessly tried to hunt the few lucky survivors down to relieve them from their "good, unspoiled blood" in a desperate bid to save themselves with it...

I found this horror novel immensly gripping and suspenseful. The characters are interesting, their adventures and fights for survival will keep anyone on the edge of their seats all throughout the book. To round it off, the ending is not ony amazingly exciting but also satisfactory, something I've meanwhile come to learn can't be expected of every James Herbert book (I've read six so far, of which I loved three, liked two and didn't care much for one other).

"48" is an absolute MUST READ for every dedicated horror/doomsday scenario/suspense thriller fan.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars London Is Hell, 28 Jan 2012
By 
Warren Stalley (Bradford, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: '48 (Kindle Edition)
I must admit I haven't read any James Herbert books for a long, long time. The last one I consumed was Others and that was excellent. This novel reminds me of I Am Legend by Richard Matheson but given a very British spin on things. It starts with an extended chase sequence and the pace never seems to let up. The words fly by and a very skilled writer takes you on a journey through a hellish London. James Herbert has put a lot of research and effort into this novel and it shows. This really is one of his best books and I strongly recommend it to any fan of James Herbert.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What if..., 24 Mar 2010
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This review is from: '48 (Paperback)
James Herbert's horrific take on an alternative ending to WWII.

A beaten Hitler's last ditch attempt at conquering the world by unleashing biological warfare concealed in V-2 rockets. He didn't figure on survivors though, namely those with the rare blood group ABneg who are immune to the virus. One such survivor is "Hoke," a US pilot living alone in a decimated London of 1948.

The decomposed husks of human debris litter the crumbling buildings and streets but worse, is the relentless pursuit of a band of ruthless diseased fascist "Blackshirts" led by the crazed "Hubble," who's sole aim, in what little life he has left, is to acquiring Hoke's blood in the belief that a transfusion will save his miserable life.

The book races along at breakneck speed, not letting up for a minute till it reaches its final blood spattered conclusion.

Good Stuff!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More Than Twice As Good As 28 Days Later, 14 May 2007
This review is from: '48 (Paperback)
It is a shame that readers new to this book will think it derivative of the zombie movie resurgence - or should that be resurrection - especially 28 Days Later and its sequel.

As often with Herbert, it is a gripping page turner with a stunning backdrop of a desolate London whose streets are piled with corpses.

I read it while playing Craig Armstrong's (Moulin Rouge/Ray/Love Actually/etc) CD The Space Between US which added to the "movie" playing in my head as I read.

Another sign of its greatness is that I got both my then teenage step-sons to read it on holiday.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK, But Not His Best, 30 Jan 2009
By 
J.Flood (Dublin,Ireland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Ghosts of Sleath (Paperback)
I enjoy reading ghost stories, and have found many of this author's novels to be very good such as, The Secret Of Crickley Hall, The Fog etc.

In this one, Psychic Investigator David Ash, is sent to the small, isolated village of Sleath, where there has been a number of strange events, that have unnerved some of the locals.

I found this book a reasonable enough read, but not of this author's better books. Although it is set in the 1990s (when the book was first written), the village and the people in it, made me feel, at times, as if I was reading a novel that was set about thirty years earler.

There is certainly some very creepy parts in the story, but I found it quite predictable in many parts, also. Only really worth a look, if you like horror novels.
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