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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quran : A Reformist Translation
Compared to popular translations such as Abdullah Yusef Ali and N J Dawood. This translation attempts to understand the Quran by using the Quran itself and not by recourse to sayings and actions attributed to Muhammad, known as Hadith and Sunnah . The authors have tried to tackle many controversial verses such as 4:34 which is traditionally understood as permission to...
Published on 7 Oct. 2010 by Amazon Customer

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3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
A refreshing translation
Published 12 months ago by THAIRA MALIK


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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quran : A Reformist Translation, 7 Oct. 2010
By 
Amazon Customer "Fifi" (The Northern Hemisphere) - See all my reviews
Compared to popular translations such as Abdullah Yusef Ali and N J Dawood. This translation attempts to understand the Quran by using the Quran itself and not by recourse to sayings and actions attributed to Muhammad, known as Hadith and Sunnah . The authors have tried to tackle many controversial verses such as 4:34 which is traditionally understood as permission to beat ones wife and verse 4:127 which is interpreted by some as sanctioning marriage to underage orphans. These and other issues are covered at the beginning of the book. The book uses modern english and therefore may be easier to read than other translations that sometimes use archiac terms or structure.The propective buyer should be aware that this translation, in addition to the actual Quran, includes extensive appendices which cover the authors musings on issues such as Salat(ritual muslim prayer), Heaven and Hell(are they eternal or not?) and Abortion(under what circumstances is it allowed?). The disputed 'miraclous' numerical Quranic code of 19 and the mysterious arabic initials which headline a number of the chapters within the Quran are also touched on. All this gives the casual reader,staunch Darwkinist atheist and dyed in the wool Taliban/Al Queda member a LOT of food for thought.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have for life book 10/10, 6 April 2014
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I have read several translations previously,and I have always been abit dubious about certain claims or statements which God has allegedly have said through the Quran, which to me at times came across that God was not as Merciful as one thought him to be.Reading this version, A Reformist Translation,by Edip Yuksel, is a totally refreshing approach to understanding the message of the Creator, The God One True God, it was as though my whole soul/spirit comprehended and acknowledged before I, my physical being was able to acknowledge and accept. This book this translation has the spirit of the words of God, which I hasten to add, if you are a truth seeker it will open your heart which inturn will make you accept and submit to your creator. This is a must for all honest, sincere, open minded individuals, this is a book of books which should be at the top of the list for a gift to give to family and friends.
May God guide those who seek for peace, justice and equity.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Valuable addition to my collection, 28 July 2013
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This review is from: Quran: a Reformist Translation (Koran, Kuran in Modern English) (Kindle Edition)
I already have another translation (hard copy) of the Qur'an but have found this one to be a very valuable addition to my collection. I think it is useful to examine different translations of texts so that one can come to appreciate more fully the social-political-cultural setting out of which they came. This one is both challenging and refreshing and it has helped my appreciation of Islamic spirituality and living.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must read, 22 July 2013
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This review is from: Quran: a Reformist Translation (Koran, Kuran in Modern English) (Kindle Edition)
It's the best translation out there of the Holy Book. Must read for all serious believers fir I believe a reformist view of the Holy Quran is pretty indispensable tool in the quest for understanding of the complex text of the Quran.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Non-Muslims should read this translation only, none other, 20 Nov. 2010
It's a great translation for non-Muslims. Muslims might find it discomforting to read the translation because of the mention of God instead of Allah, but I believe it actually makes it easier for non-Muslims to read it without having the bad taste in mouth from so many traditional Arabic words found in other traditional translations.

The only caveat is the choice of English words. I believe it could have been made easier by choosing more familiar words or providing a glossary of synonyms.

The initial chapters talk about thousand years of common misunderstandings about Islam by both Muslims and non-Muslims with solid reasoning on why people have misinterpreted the intention of God and mistranslated the Quran. There are some really hot topics like husband beating wife, the last prophet assumed to be illiterate, why Hadith should be trashed, can a man really marry more than one woman, should thieves' hands be cut off and so on. There are compelling reasoning on why Muslims have mistranslated verses of Quran on these topics and how that has resulted in thousand years of blind faith, mass murders, and made Islam look like a barbaric religion to non-Muslims or even to Muslims who has strong reasoning.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No outside influence, 19 July 2011
Peace,

When you read the Qu'ran its true content can only be understood from the Arabic language. Although I have a good understanding of Arabic it is not my mother tongue (English). It is hard to find a good English translation of the Qu'ran due to the many apparent outside influences many well known 'scholars' use to convert what they say is its true content into English.

Edip Yuksel has translated a very literal word for word version of the Qu'ran and it is sincere in its form. It tackles the many hard to discuss issues such as 'beating the woman' and confirms in its truest form without the use of Hadith that the verse actually means 'separate from them as a last resort'. However, misogyny is rife in the backwards states of predominantly Muhammedan countries. Topics covered such as this prove that deviation from God is deviation from his way, which has never changed (17:77).

Coupled with this amazing translation, it also covers a wide array of historical evidence proving that true Submission to God is preserved in the Qu'ran but corrupted in practice. Take for example the Shahada, 30 times mentioned a(at least) in the Qu'ran without ONE mention of Muhammed's name next to it. The Shahada is an act of worship and acts of worship are devoted to God alone (4:36, 39:45) not to a messenger who is to serve God only.

A superb translation along with historical evidence of decades of misguidance from traditional parental influence makes this buy first on the list when recommending friends. If I ever have to buy another Qu'ran to provide to friends, it will undoubtedly be this one and I can rest easy knowing that this is one of the many cogs in the wheel of reform in our beautiful religion.

The footnotes in this translation are relevant to historical evidence and this can be very handy when discussing certain verses. However I would ALWAYS advise to back up any information you receive and verify it yourself (As per 17:36). Yet the information provided in this book is very accurate.

Maybe one day we can all get back to calling ourselves Muslims like Muhammed did and not Qu'ran alone Muslims. I am pretty sure Muhammed could not warn from anything other than the Qu'ran (50:45).

Bravo Edip, well done brother.

Peace
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 11 Aug. 2014
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Most accurate translation out there.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 28 July 2014
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A refreshing translation
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Error upon error, 27 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: Quran: a Reformist Translation (Koran, Kuran in Modern English) (Kindle Edition)
Personally I have a problem with fundamentalists of any persuasion. I don't care if they are a fundamentalist of the religious type or non-religious such as Richard Dawkins. Anyone who has an `I'm right, they (or you) wrong' attitude flips a switch in my head to `stop listening'.
I personally believe you can find `a truth', you can definitely find `your truth', but you cannot find `the truth'. The tone of this book is unfortunately very much of the `we are right' variety.
A lot of books with religion as their subject have this default perspective, so maybe I should ignore that particular idiosyncrasy if I am ever to learn anything I hear you say? Otherwise what is there left to read on the subject of religion?
The problem is that the primary rationale given by the authors of the need for a reformist translation, is that other translations from the original Arabic have ploughed furrows of misunderstanding in some major areas (rights and role of women etc.) that have been followed down the generations by other translators; leading to us all having a distorted view of Islam and its teachings.
Interesting. Basically a needed fresh perspective, prompting debate and contributing to the evolution of this beautiful and simple faith? Well no actually. Why? Because this particular piece of work is full of error. We find `angle' instead of angel, and `latte days' instead of last days etc. So celestial beings become basic maths, and Armageddon becomes a trip to Starbucks. Makes you wonder why people who are so keen on not following what they see as the mistakes of others are so careless in their own work. Of course the worrying thing is not the mistakes you notice, it's the ones you don't and may accept as correct. I think I will stick to the well respected translation I already own.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 30 Nov. 2014
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Asp (Hertfordshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Quran: a Reformist Translation (Koran, Kuran in Modern English) (Kindle Edition)
Thank you
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