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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review by Foucoult on the two+two website
I got this book myself and wanted to write a review but then I saw this review on the 2+2 website which explains it much better then I ever could. Thanks Foucoult!

According to their introduction, the authors of Kill Everyone set out "to marry poker math with real-time experiences to provide a sound approach to recurring situations you'll encounter as you...
Published on 27 Jun 2008 by G. A. Thart

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth a read.
It gives a good bases to work from for advance uses and has improved my game, but with all of these books it gets a bit heavy into maths and mental arithmatic. If you can absorb all the knowledge you will be at an advantage with the oppostion and start winning.
Published 20 months ago by Steve


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review by Foucoult on the two+two website, 27 Jun 2008
By 
G. A. Thart (Plymouth, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I got this book myself and wanted to write a review but then I saw this review on the 2+2 website which explains it much better then I ever could. Thanks Foucoult!

According to their introduction, the authors of Kill Everyone set out "to marry poker math with real-time experiences to provide a sound approach to recurring situations you'll encounter as you accumulate chips and approach the money" in poker tournaments. Although the book does contain a healthy mix of math and tactics, I can't agree that the two are married. In fact, they are rather bifurcated: Lee Nelson writes largely about the latter in two sections of the book, while Tysen Streib focuses on the former in his "Endgame Strategy" section.

The Streib section is fantastic, easily some of the best poker writing I've seen and well worth the cover price in its own right. Nelson's material is more hit-or-miss. He explains a lot of concepts and plays well, though many will be familiar to successful internet players already, and at times his presentation is distracting or downright misleading. On the whole, Kill Everyone is a solid tournament book, and even the "bonus" short-handed cash game section by Mark Vos is pretty strong.

Not only is Streib's contribution excellent, it's also especially valuable because it focuses on late game and final table play, where the stakes are at their highest. Central to Streib's analysis are some concepts he calls CPR (cost-per-round, or the sum of the blinds and antes), CSI (chip status index, which, like Harrington's M, tells you how many more rounds you can survive without winning a pot), and the bubble factor (a measure of the non-linear value of chips based on stack sizes and payout structure). His explanation of this non-linearity and quantification of how it ought to affect decision making is the most convincing and helpful material I've seen on the subject.

A wide variety of charts and graphs elucidate these concepts and demonstrate how to put them into practice. Because late game tournament play sees short stacks moving all in pre-flop, Streib is able to solve optimal strategies for shoving, folding, and calling that take the bubble factor into account. The techniques he employs, called Independent Chip Modeling (ICM) are extremely important for tournament players to understand.

Naturally, this material is of special interest to sit-and-players, and Streib's section even includes a hand-for-hand analysis of an actual sit-and-go played by Juanda, Ulliot, Ferguson, and Ivey. I suppose there's something to be said for the name recognition, but as good as these players are, none of them is actually a sit-and-go expert. Still, Streib uses their mistakes as much as their correct plays to illustrate important concepts.

Perhaps the most innovative portion of Streib's work are shove/fold/call charts that incorporate empirical data on how small stakes sit-and-go players actually play. In other words, he details not only the game theoretically optimal solutions but also the best way to exploit opponents who do not themselves understand or implement optimal play.

Nelson's material is more scattershot. It ranges from tight-aggressive (TAG) play to loose-aggressive (LAG) play to picking up tells to what to eat and when to sleep before and during a tournament. There's some good stuff in there, but it's not presented in an especially thorough or methodical way. Rather, tactics and "pointers" are blended with anecdotes and disparaging comments about "online players".

Nelson's first section is about accumulating chips in the early stages of a tournament. His overviews of TAG and LAG play are good, and he offers some helpful explanations such as why it's worth raising speculative hands even when blind stealing is not an important consideration.

Key concepts here are Fold Equity and Fear Equity. The former should be familiar to most poker players, but it's important enough to warrant discussion anyway. Nelson does give it thorough consideration, including an explanation of why and how fold equity matters even when you have the best hand.

Fear Equity is a way of getting Fold Equity. It refers to building an image of a tough, aggressive player whom other players will want to avoid. Later in a tournament, this is important for stealing blinds pre-flop and picking up pots with continuation bets.

Though much of this material will be useful online, Nelson is a live pro and his work generally assumes that context. For the most part, he is good about explaining the assumptions that underlie his plays, such as the important observation that on the contemporary tournament scene, all-in bets are often perceived as weaker than smaller bets. However, he also has an annoying tendency to make disparaging asides about "online players" as a group.

Unlike Streib's heavily mathematical material, Nelson's is grounded primarily in experience and anecdote. The author's insistence on sharing these stories is generally more distracting and results oriented than it is entertaining or enlightening. When he does touch on math, he doesn't always get it right. For instance, his consideration of the "5-10 Rule" (you can call with speculative hands for 5-10% of the effective stacks) is superficial and misleading. The rule rests on a lot of assumptions about an opponent's range and tendencies that Nelson does not consider and that probably do not hold in his examples.

I do appreciate that Nelson references other poker authors both to support his arguments and to explain how and why his views differ from theirs. It's unfortunate that so much poker literature insists on either reinventing the wheel or contradicting other well-respected works without explanation. This can leave inexperienced readers bored or confused. Hopefully more authors will take Kill Everyone's lead and begin dialoguing with each other rather than pretending that they write in a vacuum.

Nelson, a retired doctor, also addresses a grab bag of other topics such as how to deal with jet lag, how to relieve stress and clear your mind, what to eat to keep your mind sharp during a tournament, etc. Those who appreciated Tommy Angelo's Elements of Poker will find this material helpful, as Nelson is a lot more concrete in his recommendations and even offers some pharmaceutical and technological shortcuts.

The final section, penned by guest author Mark Vos, is surprisingly good. I say "surprisingly" because it's all about playing with 100BB+ stacks, and Vos is notorious for short stacking the big NLHE games on Full Tilt Poker, where he's a sponsored player. But he provides a competent, concise introduction to short-handed cash game play.

In particular, he offers some helpful tidbits that will orient tournament players unaccustomed to seeing a lot of turns and rivers. These streets are the trickiest for cash game beginners, but also the most important. Vos doesn't have room to address them thoroughly, but the tips he does give should plug some common leaks.

Unfortunately, this section is much better on the 5-10 Rule than was Nelson's. Though Vos recognizes that, "If the player is tight aggressive and skilled post-flop, speculative holdings lose a lot of value, because the skilled players seldom pay you off by losing their entire stacks," he still claims that implied odds of 10-1 are good enough to call a reraise with a suited connector. It also would've been nice to see a more thorough discussion of board texture and how it affects what kinds of plays you try to make.

Though not particularly well integrated with each other, the contributions of each author are overwhelmingly good, and on the whole Kill Everyone is one of the better tournament books on the market. The biggest "weakness" of the book is that a good chunk of it focuses on exploiting currently popular trends and plays, so it may become dated at some point. But that's all the more reason to buy it soon!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't take on a plane, 6 Jun 2011
This review is from: Kill Everyone: Advanced Strategies for No-Limit Hold 'Em Poker Tournaments and Sit-n-Gos (Kindle Edition)
To echo the previous reviewers, this book is absolute quality. A superb tool for tournament play. The info on shoving and calling ranges is especially good.

Minor quibbles (which don't prevent the 5 star rating).

- the 6 max / shorthanded section looks a bit of an afterthought

- given the title of this book, I'm reluctant to take it on my holidays/ through customs.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My kind of book: no waffle, just purely mathematical and logical rigour, 23 Jan 2010
The 1st edition of this book was fundamental in helping me to develop a relatively unexploitable style of play, the kind of play that infuriates opponents and makes them swear at you in the chat box. As a schoolteacher, I prefer to play a small amount of smart poker (not more than 20 hours a week) rather than play lots of poker. The last thing I need is to tire myself out mass multitabling and straining my brain cells due to a bunch of difficult decisions. I much prefer the route of unexploitability, where I am the long-run statistical winner even if I lose a hand.

I got the 2nd edition because Elky is someone whom I hold a great deal of respect for. When I heard that the 2nd edition would include commentary from Elky, I just had to buy it.

A very interesting addition to the book was on shorthanded, shortstack cash play. Although, the authors have held back with some of the maths, a mathematician with half a brain will be able to use that chapter as a foundation to develop, over the course of a week or so, a reasonably unexploitable and solid shortstack game in a shorthanded context. Before others come here and start berating me for being a proponent of the shortstack philosophy, I think such people need to ask themselves WHY they play poker ? Do they play for fun or do they play for profits? If the latter, they should remain silent. Shortstacking is most certainly within the rules of play, and the chapter in this book is a useful addition to the very scarce literature available on this niche form of poker.

This book is a BUY !!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great poker book, 20 Jun 2010
A great poker book. There was a couple of new strategies and processes I had not heard about before. It give good breakdown of the maths behind them with examples. It is also good to have the comments from Elky. I would recommend this book.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Poker Nugget must have, 30 Dec 2010
So I started playing poker around 1 year ago, I have read many books and lost a lot of money on-line.
After reading the first few chapters I couldn't believe some of the comments and theories as they were completely opposite to the play tight and use this hand chart for position x at the table.
I decided to invest some more money into my account and test the strategies, mainly playing 360 players SitnGo tournaments.
I came first after just the 4th try and now regularly make cashes in the first few slots.

My advice is to buy this book, read it once, then read it again and test some of the strategies and insight from Poker pro "Elky". This book has really changed my perspective on the game and has helped me cash on various tournaments.
I am now testing the strategies on the 10 player SitnGo at micro stakes and ham doing well, my bank role is steadily increasing.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Getpokerskills - Useful and practical strategies, 18 Dec 2007
This second book by Lee Nelson and his new collaborators [Tysen Streib and Kim Lee] details some very advanced tournament poker concepts and strategies. It is also based on the modern game [also sometimes called the 'new school'] of very strong aggression. Where 'Kill Phil' emphasized a long-ball strategy due to its target audience being beginning tournament players, this book teaches small-ball play in the early stages of a tournament, and provides further analysis of the long-ball tactics introduced in 'Kill Phil'. Thus, you now have both strategies in your arsenal to be utilized as befits the situation.

**Important and useful to know**
If your from the uk and want this book, dont go spending the £60+ that most are asking. Email me and I will tell you where to get it for less than £20
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book for tournament players, 22 Feb 2009
By 
K. M. MacLean (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Whereas Kill Phil was a beginners' book focusing on pre-flop play, Kill Everyone moves on to the more advanced skills you'll need to succeed in tournaments (cash players note, there is an excellent chaper on online 6-max NLHE games by Mark Vos). What I particularly like about this book is that it gives a very clear explanation of the differences between deep-stack, medium-stack and shallow-stack play which generally (albeit not always) co-incides with the early-, middle- and late-stages of a tourney. Naturally it emphasizes the importance of aggression (all good books do) but it helps you to understand how to get the maths on your side at the same time, which is particularly important during the bubble and in push-or-fold mode. The section on aggressive play during the bubble is particularly helpful.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great book for advanced players, 26 May 2011
By 
Ath K. Nikolopoulos (Kos, Greece) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
While Kill Phil was aiming to the novice players and suggested a very basic way to deal with games against better/top players...

...this book has many more advanced topics that

1) teach you how to deal with the simple but effective strategy described in Kill Phil 1, and
2) more importantly give you some detailed and advanced thoughts on poker strategies for advanced play.

Really, this book is not meant to be your first one, but if you learn the basics of poker, this one will be an essential purchase.

Highly recommended!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for serious players, 4 July 2014
Its taken me a long time to read this book but my lord it was worth it. I am a semi professional NLH player with over $50,000 online profit from MTT's but found my profits were slowing down due to leaks in my game. This book has helped me plug a few of those leaks and help me look at the game from several diffrent perspectives.

If you are dedicated to playing poker then I would strongly suggest you read this book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Most helpful poker book, 15 May 2014
Of the books I've read on poker, this has by far been the most helpful, and impactful on my game. Would recommend highly. I never leave reviews, but felt compelled to do so for this excellent book.
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