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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Introduction
This is a good introduction at a time when things in the HTML and CSS world don't seem entirely set in concrete. Some areas will need a deeper treatment later. If, as I did, you just wanted a "getting started" view this is a good one. Wishing there were a similar book for CSS3.
Published on 7 Oct 2010 by Martin Packer

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61 of 63 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too much chatter, too little detail
I must say: I enjoyed going through this book. It is written in an opinionated and slightly irreverent style, so I found it a mildly amusing read.

That being said: why do people buy a book on HTML5? Some would like to have a good in-depth reference on the ins and outs of the new language. Well now - that's not this book. Others might be new to web development...
Published on 24 Sep 2010 by Andor Admiraal


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61 of 63 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too much chatter, too little detail, 24 Sep 2010
By 
Andor Admiraal (Pune) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
I must say: I enjoyed going through this book. It is written in an opinionated and slightly irreverent style, so I found it a mildly amusing read.

That being said: why do people buy a book on HTML5? Some would like to have a good in-depth reference on the ins and outs of the new language. Well now - that's not this book. Others might be new to web development and think learning HTML5 would be a good starting point. While they are right that HTML (5 or 4) is the place to start, this book surely isn't.

There's some depth when it comes to background, but much less when it comes to HTML5 itself or how to use it. True, the <canvas> tag and geolocation are covered pretty much in detail, but the author made some hard to defend choices in spending his paper estate.

HTML5 gives us no more than a handful of new tags, still some of those (<mark> and <section>, for example) are simply mentioned once and that's that. No examples, no advise on where to use them, nothing on browser support. Yet the book takes five pages at the start to tell the story of how the img-tag came into being some 15 years ago. Again, mildly amusing, but probably not the reason you are thinking of buying this book.

Another example: there are 10 pages with a primer on audio and video codecs, plus another 19 (!) detailed pages (with lots of screen shots) on how to use a number of specific and probably soon outdated software tools to encode video for the web. All fine for those who are completely new to video encoding and believe a book on HTML5 should be the starting point for that. But when it comes to the actual <video> tag (under the aptly named heading "At Last, the Markup"), this consists of a meager 3 pages that include a statement like this:

"The <video> element has methods like play() and pause()".

Huh? "Methods like"? So which other methods are there? And how and where would I use them? Are these standardized across browsers? Where can I find more about them? Any example, maybe?

If you think these are the kind of questions a book on HTML5 should answer, you are out of luck. The above sentence is all the information on this particular topic you are going to get. Not a word about implementing these methods, or on how to style the browsers' native video controllers that come with HTML5 support. There are a good number of external references for information on things like Unicode, codecs and video containers, and some useful scripts, but not a word on how we can get the information on how to control and style the <video> tag. Maybe the logical conclusion would be: in another book on HTML5, perhaps?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Should be called HTML 5 and JAVASCRIPT, 27 Sep 2013
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This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
HTML 5: Up and Running is an entertaining and informative read, although only about 200 pages long and full of code snippets in PHP and Javascript. It's barely hinted at in the precis. In fairness, the examples are reasonably easy to understand, but there's almost no explanation of the syntax of these other languages. I guess the assumption is that if you are already proficient in HTML, then you've probably topped that up with some Javascript learning in the period prior to getting this book.

Something reading this book reveals, is that the there's more to learn about the context in which the new HTML 5 tags work than there is about the new tags themselves. An obvious example is the simplicity of the <video> tag and the complexity of audio and video codecs, MIME types, bit rates and cross-browser compatibility. The author has dug around on the web for utilities and work-arounds and that's what swathes of this book are about.

It's worth noting that XHTML has been abandoned for several years, which may come as a big surprise and disappointment to some people. O'Reilly's current Definitive Guide to HTML and XHTML won't be updated until July 2014, at which point XHTML will be dropped from the title.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Introduction, 7 Oct 2010
This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
This is a good introduction at a time when things in the HTML and CSS world don't seem entirely set in concrete. Some areas will need a deeper treatment later. If, as I did, you just wanted a "getting started" view this is a good one. Wishing there were a similar book for CSS3.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Extensive book about simple topic, 18 Jan 2013
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This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
This book is available online for free. Maintained by the author. [...] I tried to read the complete book on the website, but failed. The website is good as a reference, but the book throws you into HTML 5. Suddenly I understood WHAT html5 stands for and why every web builder should use it. Not just because it is cool.

The book is wel written and gives you great insights.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Usefull book, easy to understand, 12 Jan 2013
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This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
I have purchased several of these books on various topics because I find them very helpfull and easy to follow. Would recommend this book for anyone requiring extra help with HTML5.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect, compact and useful, 23 July 2011
By 
Swansil (Florence, Italy) - See all my reviews
This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
This manual is perfect for those who need or want to be up to date with the new HTML5.
Highly recommended!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good Introduction, 24 April 2011
By 
David Cross "davorg" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
Mark Pilgrim has written a really useful introduction to the new technologies that are driving HTML5 adoption. If you're creating HTML for web sites then I recommend this book.

I'm not a web site designer, but I've always tried to produce web sites that use valid HTML. And then when the current standard switched from HTML to XHTML I converted most of my web sites to the new standard. A couple of years ago, some friends started talking about HTML5 being a replacement for XHTML. I was tired of converting my web sites, so I pretty much ignored them.

And then last year more and more people started talking about HTML5. It was obviously time to investigate further. And Mark Pilgrim's book seemed as good a place as any to start.

It turns out that HTML5 is rather more than just a mark-up language. It's a term that encompasses a number of new technology standards that will be driving web application development for many years to come.

Pilgrim explains all the new elements that are available in HTML5. Some of these, obviously, won't be supported by older browsers so, perhaps more importantly, he also covers how to detect which features are supported on a browser which is visiting your site. In each case, he explains the nuts and bolts of how it would be done, but then he also describes how it can be done far more easily using the Modernizr Javascript library.

The most interesting new features to me are the native support for audio and video (although there is still some disagreement between browser makers as to which formats are supported) and the canvas element which will finally allow some powerful graphical effects to be produced in a manner which will work well across most (if not all) browsers.

I haven't yet had a chance to really start using HTML5 on my web sites. But when I do, this is a book that I will return to frequently.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good starter book, 4 Dec 2010
By 
Alessio Bragadini "abragad" (Milan, Italy) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
I expected a larger book, this is in fact a quick introduction to most elements of HTML5 including the markup, the offline API, the Geolocation API, etc. It's quite good at what it does but doesn't go into deep details, except for the chapter on microformats which stands apart from the rest of the book. This is especially interesting since Mr Pilgrim works at Google and you can see the power of microformats when used by a search engine.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Nice introduction but far from complete, 21 Nov 2010
By 
Horst Gutmann (Graz, Österreich) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
Disclaimer: I've received a review copy of this book from O'Reilly.

For the impatient among you a short summary: HTML5: Up and Running is a book presenting you some of the more prominent features of HTML5 including canvas, localStorage and the applicationCache. It sadly leaves out a whole range of other features like WebSockets and the data-attributes. Also the writing style reminds you often enough that this book was created out of the author's Dive Into HTML5 project with each chapter and subchapter being able to stand alone which (thanks to the repetition of explanations et al.) makes reading certain chapters not all that pleasant. In general, if you want a book that teaches you some of the new core features of HTML5 and you really want a book, this might be something for you.

This book is described on the publisher's website as a "guide [...] through the important changes" that come with HTML5. The focus here lies on features like the new form-elements, canvas, video and audio integration, localStorage and the applicationCache as well as the microdata component of HTML5. All these are presented with a couple of examples so you should know how to use them for basic operations after reading the respective chapters.

HTML5 is put into perspective with the first chapter that tells some of the history of HTML and how changes to the language have been proposed in the past and how HTML5 came to be. Even if you have known most of this before, it is a nicely written summary.

But back to the present. Sadly the described range of features is far from covering all that is important about HTML5. The author forgot about things like the sessionStorage, WebWorkers, WebSockets or the data-attributes. Instead the books contains a couple chapter telling you on how to use ffmpeg and Handbrake to create videos in the codecs and containers supported by most modern web browsers. Space that could have been better used for the new network tools, in my opinion.

Suprisingly the appendix, which contains a short summary on how to detect the new features in a browser (which the author himself summarized with "Try Modernizr"), also contains some of the features not mentioned in the "main chapters". That said, the appendix in itself was in my opinion completely useless since it is bascially just a collection of links to each feature and the detection script. The "missing features" received no explanation what so ever.

Another big issue (at least for me) is the writing style as mentioned above. Explaining the first example line-by-line is a good thing. Repeating that with every following example that only contains a minor variation of the solution might end up annoying the reader (as it did with me).

Don't get me wrong, though: This a good book if you're new to HTML5 and want a book that teaches you some of the new features without going into controversial decisions like microdata vs. rdfa vs. microformats. If you want more or even a complete overview, you will have to look somewhere else, though.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book to get you started, 10 Dec 2010
By 
Misja Alma (Amsterdam, Netherlands) - See all my reviews
This review is from: HTML5: Up and Running (Paperback)
This book does exactly what it says: It gets you up and running with Html5 quickly.

It is written in a funny style which makes it nice too read, but now and then there was a bit too much Internet Explorer- bashing for my taste. The writer is working for Google and that shows.

All new Html5 concepts are explained with some background, some practical tips and some code examples. It is not a very thick book so it doesn't get too deeply into all the details but it tells you enough to start using Html5.
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HTML5: Up and Running by Mark Pilgrim
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