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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic powerhouse of a camera, just missed the mark for me.
I have been monitoring this camera for several months and read every review going. When Nikon announced their cash back, I jumped at the chance and I am delighted.

I am not a professional photographer, so my review comes from an enthusiast point of view having come from a D3100. Incidentally, I am keeping my D3100 because I cannot bear to part with it. I have...
Published 24 months ago by D. Kong

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The magic, the madness the D7000 back focus nightmare
In many ways an easy camera to add to your buy list. The D7000 has just about everything you could want in a DSLR, at a yes please price.
However extended use reveals some serious flaws, and leaves you with a very much dampened view of the camera. I would consider it on paper a great camera, but the real world use does not live up to the hype.

You'll look...
Published on 8 Nov. 2012 by Mr Baz


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic powerhouse of a camera, just missed the mark for me., 14 May 2013
By 
D. Kong (Glasgow, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Nikon D7000 Digital SLR Camera Body Only (16.2MP) 3 inch LCD - (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Camera)
I have been monitoring this camera for several months and read every review going. When Nikon announced their cash back, I jumped at the chance and I am delighted.

I am not a professional photographer, so my review comes from an enthusiast point of view having come from a D3100. Incidentally, I am keeping my D3100 because I cannot bear to part with it. I have several lenses to pair with my D7000 including a 35 f1.8G, 85 1.8G, 55-300 VR and the main lens which I use which is a 17-55mm.

Look and feel
After becoming so used to the D3100 lightweight body, the D7000 seems much bulkier but in a good way. It feels good in the hand and paired with the equally tank-like 17-55mm it has some weight behind it. Moving from the D3100 to D7000 was easy as the controls are familiar. I used to like having the ISO/Aperture/Shutter Speed information in the live view so getting used to this on the small panel at the top right took some time however now I think this is great and prefer it. It also saves battery by keeping the live view off. However, like most things with this camera, you can customise it so this is on by default should you wish. I like how most of the main function buttons fall where you naturally hold the camera. My one gripe was that when I was moving the autofocus point while looking through the viewfinder, my thumb was right underneath my cheek making it slightly awkward. A minor negative in the scheme of things.

Functions
One thing that annoyed me with the D3100 was the auto-ISO function, which I sometimes used when I was being lazy! You had to go into the main menu to turn it on (or off). This took about 10 seconds of annoyance. Now, I have set my U1 setting in my D7000 to auto-ISO. So, now when if I want this on, I can just turn the dial. The beauty of this camera is the huge amount of customisable features. U1 and U2 very useful, you can assign the various function buttons to do different things - AE lock, DOF preview, etc. I also like that you can increase the ISO by 1/3 stop instead of 1/2. There are dials at the front where your right finger sits and at the back where the thumb is. This makes it super quick to change any the ISO and aperture.

Performance
The AF is much faster than I was expecting. It locks onto targets super-quick. I have read in some reviews about a back-focusing problem which seemed to be quite common. I unfortunately had that same problem. All my lenses except from the 85mm f1.8 I had to fine tune each of the lenses. With the 17-55mm I had to make a -17 adjustment. It seems to be pretty much fine now. However, I've read that because it is a zoom it is much harder to fine tune. The occasional photo misses the focus slightly, but this is me pixel peeping at 1:1. I will probably bring it into my local shop to get this checked over.

Image Quality and ISO performance
The main reason for the upgrade was for all the reviews regarding the great ISO performance. I agree to an extent. No doubt putting the D3100 and D7000 side by side, the D7000 wins hands down however I was maybe expecting too much from this. In good light, up to ISO 1000 I can barely notice any noise at all. After that noise starts to appear, when you reach ISO 3200, you can see noise but it's not bad. I am happy to use images up to ISO 6400. I don't print images very large but I would be surprised if you see noticeable noise for an ISO6400 in an A4 print. ISO performance and IQ is great, however I was expecting a little more based on what I've read.

There are many other features which I haven't mentioned but there's too many for this review!

In conclusion, the image quality and ISO performance is fantastic. Coupled with the huge amount of customisable features and quick functions to make your life as a photographer easier, this makes it a hugely recommended camera from me. The biggest problem at the moment is the back-focusing issue. I've adjusted it to -17 and it's pretty much sorted, but not 100% accurate. However, for normal sized prints you would not be able to tell that the focus was off. I really want to give this 5 stars, but I can't. The back-focusing issue although not terrible has annoyed me. This is the best camera I have every owned yet this is still only getting 4 stars.

*Update*
This update is not with regards to the camera but for anyone wanting to use the Nikon repair centre for cameras under warranty. As discussed in the review, I was going to take my camera into the repair centre to double check that my -17 fine tune was accurate. I am lucky enough to be close to one of the official Nikon repair centres. I thought it might take a day or two to look at and fix but they are estimating it to be two weeks before it's looked at. I'm afraid for me that's far too long a wait to get a camera looked at. They said that 2 weeks was the average turnaround time for the quiet periods. My camera would go to the back of a queue and would be looked at in due course. I decided not to leave my camera with them for 2 weeks and live with my -17 adjustment.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Auto focus function takes some practise, 1 Jan. 2013
This review is from: Nikon D7000 Digital SLR Camera Body Only (16.2MP) 3 inch LCD - (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Camera)
I owned a D200 for many years and loved the simplicity of it. The D7000 is the obvious upgrade to the D200 (or similar cameras) if you don't have the budget for something like a D3. Although the body is slightly smaller, the functionality of the D7000 is much the same as the D200 but they've tampered with the autofocus, and made it TOO automatic. With a bit of practise you get used to it, but this is a classic case of "If it ain't broke, why fix it?". They also took off the sync connector-why? That's plain daft. They've also added a nasty Canon style mode dial on the top left. Some nice touches, though - having 2 card slots and being able to store the raw file on one, and the jpeg on the other is great. Makes it much easier to sort out the crap shots in post-production. The slightly bigger screen is helpful, and the pixel count of 16mp helps when enlarging pics. Good general build quality-the metal parts of the body makes it heavier than the plastic Canons, but it feels very robust. Being a bit of a Luddite, I generally don't like "live-view", but it works OK here, if you want that sort of thing. Don't understand why all the manufacturers are bigging-up video on stills cameras. I'll never use video on this camera-if I want video I'll use a proper video camera, so I won't comment on the video function. There have been lots of comments on review sites about this camera over-exposing highlights - I have NEVER found that to be the case.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars could not expect more, 2 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Decided to purchase D7000 after 2 months of researching and investigations. I had short listed Nikon D7000 and Canon 7D and finally decided in the favour of D7000. I ordered in the afternoon and it was delivered the next day before 9:00 AM. The initial results of the camera are just amazing, high quality images in low light and normal light. The images show natural colors and nice tones on the skin. The camera is full of features and functions that I am sure will take some time to understand. But I could start shooting without reading the thick manual because the buttons are quite easy to understand.
I would recommend this camera to anyone who does not want to spend a fortune on pro cameras like D800 and 5DMark III etc which are also very big and heavy.
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102 of 109 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enthusiast level D-SLR, 4 Jan. 2011
By 
Ripple (uk) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Chances are that if you are even considering this camera, it is as an upgrade. There are now countless comparisons in the photo magazines and on the web that you can use to check out how it compares in features, so there's little merit in repeating them here. It's certainly an "enthusiast" spec so for a starter camera it is probably more than you will need to pay. Camera manufacturers don't make it easy as each are backing slightly different technology horses - and at the end of the day (which coincidently is a time when this camera is particularly good due to it's ability to handle low light with remarkably little noise) it's a matter of personal preference which manufacturer you favour. I find Nikons fit better in the hand than Canon or Pentax cameras - so head to your camera petting zoo to see which one fits best for you. I also find the controls more intuitive with the two wheel system. I also prefer Nikon's colour performance particularly compared with Canon's more saturated colour rendition, but since you will probably use some PC processing, this is not a deal breaker. If you believe the mark of quality is in resolution, you can get more Mps with a Canon 550d- but at 16.2 Mp this is more than adequate for the amateur and prints at least A3 sized with no problem or loss of clarity. And the quality is down as much to the quality of processor as to the number of pixels per se. If you have a heap of Canon (or other) lenses though, then it's probably not great enough to warrant the cost of changing horses in midstream as Nikon lenses house the autofocus on the lenses rather than in the body as Canon does.

If you are coming at it afresh though, you are really looking at this against the Canon EOS 60D or the Pentax K-5 (although you can argue until the cows come home which the competitors really are. It's an upgrade on the Nikon D90 as well and certainly on any lower Nikons, and price wise, the Canon 550d might be in the same bracket).

Where the D7000 is arguably weaker is in the fact that the rear screen is fixed while many competitors allow angled versions. If you are planning on life as a Paparazzo, then this may be an issue but for me this tends to be more useful for movie filming. Which brings me to a second slight weakness - while the HD video is excellent on the D7000 my unit had a few dead pixels (only apparent in video) but there is now a Firmware update that has reduced this, not totally, but certainly to more than acceptable levels on my unit. But I don't film video that often so this isn't a concern. I've also tended to prefer the shutter release firmness on Nikons, and here it is OK but a bit mushier (technical term that!) than on the D90 for example.

In almost every other respect, this is a cracking camera. I love the duel card system that lets you save stills and video to different cards, or acts as a simple additional storage or for me, the best option allows you to save as both RAW and jpeg versions (incidentally, Adobe has now added D7000's RAW to it's list - but you will have to download that separately to even the latest Photoshop versions).

The D7000 offers up to 39 AF points - which really is superb in this price bracket and which helps to generate superb image quality. The camera's low light performance is superb; even at ISO 12 800 it's just about acceptable. The build quality is fantastic and, while it tends to concentrate on doing the basics well, it has some nice features like low noise shutter options. The burst rate of 6fps is also pretty decent. Battery life is good too.

It's a cracking bit of kit and more similar to Nikon's semi-pro D300S than the lower ranges but at an enthusiast price band (albeit that as a new product the pricing is still a bit toppish - made worse by the VAT increase of course - but will undoubtedly come down in time ...... if you can resist that long though). But for all it's cleverness, you can pretty much operate it out of the box as a very over-priced point an shoot, if that's what you want to do (but why would you?)

It's not faultless (as explained) but it's certainly an excellent choice and you are unlikely to be disappointed. Is it good enough to swop bodies from a competitor? Well, that depends on how much kit you have invested in, but as a Nikon upgrade, it's a no-brainer. It's a joy to use and you'll love it - then when you process your pictures, you will smile smuggly to yourself at your choice all over again.

Also, the kit lens (which are always pretty ropey) is surprisingly decent here too.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely superb crop sensor DSLR., 1 Jan. 2013
By 
C. Sheppard (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nikon D7000 Digital SLR Camera Body Only (16.2MP) 3 inch LCD - (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Camera)
I shoot with a D700 (full frame) as my main camera, I am a semi-pro who shoots events and the occasional portrait. I had been using a D90 as a backup/second camera however I was constantly aware of the large difference in image quality in low light. The D90 was good when it came out but is showing it's age now. In steps the D7000. I ummed and ahh'ed for a while then went for it as an upgrade from the D90 in April 2012.

The D7000 has more then proved a worthy upgrade from the D90. In some cases I'm now using it in preference to the D700 which I never thought would happen. The D700 is still an awesome camera but being a generation old now the D7000 has some advantages. One being the dual SD card slots. I love this feature and really wish the D700 had it (the 800 does but I'm not ready to go there yet as in all other respects the D700 is still amazing for my purposes. Mostly I set the second card to be back up - this gives me extra piece of mind that the images I shoot won't be lost should a card corrupt.

The D7000 has low noise at high ISO. Being compared to the D700 isn't really fair since the photosites on the D700 are massively bigger and can gather more light, however despite the D7000's smaller sensor an 4000 more pixels crammed into that space it does impressively well. I can shoot comfortably at ISO 3200 and increase to 6400 without having to do too aggressive noise reduction. Even 12,800 is posible at a push... though it is a push!!

One are the D7000 doesn't quite match the D700 on is autofocus as it doesn't have the 51 point system in the 700, however the 39 point system is still very good and the tracking is quite accurate and responsive, certainly way better than the D90. I've used it for sports where the 5fps speed is certainly useful.

I can't really think of anything not to like about it - for what it is, which is an upgrade on a prosumer body rather than a professional body, it does an amazing job. The control layout may not be up there with the D300/700/800 and the like, but it's very good and the body is still magnesium alloy and very well built.

I sometimes use the D7000 with my 24-70 F2.8 lens and although that makes an unbalanced feel as the lens is way heavier than the camera (a battery grip might help there), the image quality output is really something and I have to say the extra resolution over the D700 is sometimes nice to play with. I feel a bit like I'm having an affair with the 7000 at the expense of my old-faithful 700.. it's that good!!
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As good as you will ever need (within DX sensor cameras), 28 May 2013
By 
Mousley (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Nikon D7000 Digital SLR Camera Body Only (16.2MP) 3 inch LCD - (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Camera)
This is it. This is really as good as it gets and value for money within APS-C sensor cameras. I had a D90 previously, which was a fantastic camera (my review is on Amazon), but I bought this as a full step-up in higher ISO capability and improved dynamic range - it also produces sharper images than the D90, but you've got to be staring seriously hard to notice!

The new 7100 is now out and with its extra MP and AA filter removed, is supposed to show an increased measure of resolution and sharpness...however, all of the professional reviews place a couple of caveats on this improvement - 1) you must have very good glass fixed to the camera to get the best out of it and 2)you must reduce / remove camera shake, or you will introduce blur into your images, due to the small size of the pixels, so then you either use a tripod (sometimes inconvenient) or increase your ISO sensitivity, to increase the shutter speed - this is going to lead to increased noise in images and thus, reduced image quality.

My top tip is to save your money, buy this camera and worry less about camera shake. Click the helpful button if you think this is the way to go...you will not be disappointed with this camera.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars you need a camera which is powerful? but cheaper than a full frame?, 20 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is nikons current best in class dx body when it comes to buying cameras. Before getting this i spent months trying to decide wether i should go with the nikon d300s or this beauty. Now i'm no pro but i know a thing or too about nikon tech. After watching the reviews i relaised that with this camera, all your missing out on is a 10 pin sync cord port (if your using studio flash systems) and the opportunity to go 8 frames a second when you either buy the grip or do the braket burst at 8 fps in some long menu setup. the d300s is aslo full metal alloy construction however trust me, when you get the D7000 it feels more than ready to handle a tough shooting enviroment because it has metal alloy top and back covers, and this is coming from a person who often takes his gear on long expeditions to the middle of nowhere.

Before i had this camera i had the d3000, which was a great little camera but was to basic. This camera offers access to the amazing CLS system which definatly is a much if you buy your first serious of camera flash and want to use it. The 6 frames a second should handle sports just fine however genrally the faster the better so maybe its not going to be your ideal camera if you shoot sports alot. However if you shoot in rooms where there is a crappy amount of light and or shoot wildlife when your pushing you basic dslr to ISO 1600-3200 then this is the deal maker. Before, on my d3000, i could only go up to ISO 800 before starting to have to worry about noise. now i can shoot 1600 without thinking about it and head up to ISO 3200-6400 and fix the iso in camera pretty effectivly. If you have an old dslr or a entry level dslr then you can only understand what this is like untill you actually buy the thing! i have no regrets.
within the first few days of having this camea i had to schoot and event for my school as it was the year 11 awards cermony and kelly holme (olmypic athlete and double gold medalist in mid distance running) came to hand out awards. i only had a a day or too to get used to the camera but it works effeceintly and without problems. the fact that it had 2 sd card slots aslo mean that there was no chance of me running out of space from fine jpegs and even hundreds of raw files.
the only down side is that if your buying this camera you have to be serious about photography. and that means buying more accessories. i aslo got a 50mm 1.8D and a sb-700 speedlite with this camera and it is the ultimate low light combonation for any dark rooms not matter how big. the quiet mode is aslo great for takiing photos in assembalys without drawing to much attention to your self and is alot more discret then Canons squeaky shutter flap sound on all of their cameras.

i could literally go on forever however i got stuff to do so i'll just leave you with this thought...

If your new to photography, get a d3100 or the new d3200 that came out today (24mp)! those will test your basic skills and get you going. if your moving on an know more than your average joe about cameras, but don't need that extra 2 frames or proper studio light capability just yet, grab your self this camera and shoot away cause i has just about evrything you will need for years to come, then you move on the the FX bodies when you feel ready :D

p.s. with the 50mm 1.8D thing thing takes awesome 1080p video with a mic input! awesome but you have to use it on manual focus if you want it to look any good...its the same witha any other dslr in its range.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Smart camera that knows when to take or give control, 16 Mar. 2011
By 
Mr. Yalin Solmaz "ysolmaz" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I absolutely love the D7000. Once you go through the manual and understand what it can do, you have everything you need to take great photos and have as much or as little control as you'd like. The camera's tough and satisfying build coupled with its sophisticated technology really make it a winner. I use it for both stills and video, and I'm very happy with my purchase. I was debating between the D7000 and the Canon 60D. I ended up picking the D7000 because of the build, the button layout, the ergonomics and the improved AF system. I would highly recommend it.
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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great machine - just a couple of notes, 16 April 2011
By 
Chris M. Dooks "bovinelife" (Glasgow) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I'm a semi-pro and I've used this camera on a couple of paid jobs now and really love it.

I'll do an old school good vs bad summary:

The Good
Everything just about; for a CMOS-sized sensor it's got a really wide latitude and it is AMAZING at high ISOs, (I took a day's images by mistake at 1250 iso and didn't even notice until I looked at the data) - the high ISOs allow slower lenses to shine almost as well as their pro competitors. I spent six weeks researching DSLRs around £1000 and this is, I believe, the very best value in the bracket. Colours are terrific, everything is natural. It's Some reviewers say that the machine even blows away full frame Nikon DLSRs.There is no back focus issue, I think this must me folks upgrading from compacts or somesuch, where sharpness algorithms over compensate for cheap glass, so when you use a DSLR like this for the first time - a full frame RAW image is MASSIVE

The Bad
1. Build quality is really plasticy. This doesn't usually bother me, so what? I hear you ask. Well, it's around the handgrip where it fails, the battery compartment doesn't close brilliantly reassuringly and when you grip the camera, that wee bit clicks a bit - all day long. I shoved a little bit of card in between the battery and the shell and it stopped it. It was really irritating me on shoots.
2. Kit lens is awful. Buy one of the cheap primes for lovely stylish sharp pictures with plenty of dreamy 'bokeh' - the 35mm afs lens should be the standard lens for this camera. If you really want a zoom for this machine the 70-300 afs VRII is brilliant.
3. Auto exposure is on the bright side. Nearly everyone agrees on this. Just set your own compensation.

Remember that DX cameras on nikon lenses add to the focal length - so the 35mm becomes a 52mm and so on...
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nikon D7000 and 18-105 lens, 25 July 2011
A very very good camera for the price. I upgraded from a 10mp D60. The extra buttons for settings are worth it over the small Nikon bodies.
I bought one again because I loved the first one and the photographs are awesomely good, will enlarge huge, or sharp small areas if needed. To see the full potential quality put on a prime (even 50mm 1.8) or better zoom lens.
File sizes are big though on RAW compared to earlier 10 or 12mp Nikons, you may need a new hard drive!
The handling is excellent.
Whilst it does 6fps against the 300s's 7fps the high speed mode on RAW files actually seems quicker than on the 300s when I tested both in store. Focus on 3d AFA or AFC is great, fast and accurate and it seems to do well for capturing birds, animals or aircraft at airshows.
The picture quality and colour depth and the tonal range is amazing. In camera fill-in flash is very accurately controlled.
It is fantastic at low light It does very well up to ISO 1600 without any visble noise, a bit at 3200 and after that the noise becomes visible.
The in camera processing and retouching tools are very useful. D Lighting allows you to correct under exposed JPEGs at three levels which is very useful to obtain a high quality JPEG from one where there is too much shadow, e.g. portraits on sunny days or contre-jour. Exposure is generally accurate but it does tend to under expose shadows and therefore the post capture D lighting is helpful.
Best of all it is light enough to carry around all day.
The 18-105 lens takes very good shots but is better at the telephoto end, at wide angle it doesn't seem quite as good as the 18-55. It does perform well though even at widest apertures and again here seems better than the 18-55. The colours are improved over the cheaper 18-55 kit lens, it has focus override, it doesn't flare as easily and the bokeh is nicer. I use mine mainly with the 18-105, 70-300 and 50mm 1.8.
I am now on my second D7000 (this one supplied by Amazon) as unfortunately the first got caught in a summer rainstorm and it died as a result. The Nikkor lens on it was fine however! Was I expecting too much of the camera?
Don't be fooled by "weather proofing" claim, it isn't waterproof and, possibly no more and maybe less than cheaper Nikons, as it has more switches which can leak moisture in.
Having said that it is my only gripe. It does produce truly superb photographs and the handling is good.
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