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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Like a parasite - it's grown on me
Anyone expecting an old skool return here from Jenkinson will indeed be disappointed; I certainly was at first as I desperately wanted another 'Theme from Ernest Borgnine'!

Whilst the sound is an evolution from 'Just a Souvenir', it's an entirely different structure but if you found that unbearable then I doubt you find much to agree with for the rest of this...
Published on 13 Dec 2010 by LordZoltan

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wrong Turn
A dissapointment by Squarepusher's usually high standards, it's not a bad album but it's not great either. Of course everyone must be aware that Jenkinson, rather than doing his usual thing of performing the works entirely by himself now has (or supposedly has, as some suspect) a mystery band behind him, this being 'Shobaleader One', I don't mind this especially except...
Published on 16 Nov 2010 by stax


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Like a parasite - it's grown on me, 13 Dec 2010
This review is from: d'Demonstrator (Audio CD)
Anyone expecting an old skool return here from Jenkinson will indeed be disappointed; I certainly was at first as I desperately wanted another 'Theme from Ernest Borgnine'!

Whilst the sound is an evolution from 'Just a Souvenir', it's an entirely different structure but if you found that unbearable then I doubt you find much to agree with for the rest of this review.

After the first listen I was convinced the whole thing was a horrible mistake; so I had another go. Since then it's gone through my ears a further 6 times (intermixed with most of his other output except most of 'Do You Know Squarepusher' 'cept the title track) and every time it's weedling its way further into my psyche.

There are fantastic melodies and choruses throughout and some frankly dirty grooves - yes choruses; because on this album there are more 'songs' than just music. The drums are a little too lo-tech in places (given the cutting-edge fills and rhythms and sounds we're used to); but overall I've found the more I listen to it, the more it makes sense and I genuinely do like all of it now - except "Maximum Planck" which is bewildering both on its own and in the context of this album, however, and I would forgive anyone for skipping it.

You have to forget everything you ever thought you knew about Tom 'Squarepusher' Jenkinson; this is coming from a different place inside of him, and if he ever joins this part of his musical personality up with the others that we have seen in the past then I think the resulting output will be something to behold.

So buy it if you're brave enough and I think you will enjoy it if you are prepared to give it repeated listens - about 3 should do it I think.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quality yet again, 24 Jan 2011
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This review is from: d'Demonstrator (Audio CD)
Tom Jenkinson has produced another wonderful piece of music. He seems amazingly prolific and for this I'm eternally grateful. This new album, though short, is packed with some lovely, funky melodic tunes that show how far ahead of everyone else he is in contemporary music. This is not to say that I am a die hard fan or don't feel able to criticise his music. Not in the least. Its just that are so few bad tracks here. Only the last one do I find a bit of a tough listen. Everything else is smooth and absorbing. This is great stuff and if you have any kind of ear you will love this. If you are expecting something harder and wilder, in tune with more of his previous work, you won't find it here. But that's no excuse to give this a bad review. Why does he have to keep doing the same stuff? Ignore the bad reviews. Treat this album on its own merits and you'll be absorbed. This is excellent music making.

There have been a lot of comparisons to Daft Punk, which is understandable considering the style. But those people who make that comparison fail to realise his extensive body of work and I think it is genuinely just coincidence that this music resembles them. In any case this is just light years ahead. Ignore the online reviews by the 'industry experts'.

I can say with confidence that I will love and listen to this album for many years to come. Thank you Tom, and keep up the good work. Keep innovating! I love the hard stuff and the soft stuff, because they're both tuneful and give me eargasms galore.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wrong Turn, 16 Nov 2010
This review is from: d'Demonstrator (Audio CD)
A dissapointment by Squarepusher's usually high standards, it's not a bad album but it's not great either. Of course everyone must be aware that Jenkinson, rather than doing his usual thing of performing the works entirely by himself now has (or supposedly has, as some suspect) a mystery band behind him, this being 'Shobaleader One', I don't mind this especially except that I miss the loose as rapper's jeans jazz rock drumming characteristic of albums like 'Music is Rotted One Note' and 'Ultravisitor' which has been replaced with bland drumming that wouldn't sound out of place on most current pop albums (WHY?!!).

I don't particularly mind the fact that most of D'demonstrator is actual songs rather than instrumentals (which have made up about 99% of Pusher's previous catalogue), although there is no organic singing, all vocoder and of course most of the lyrics are indistinguishable. What I do mind is the album's lack of any sense of adventure compared to everything else he's ever done, even 'Do You Know Squarepusher' the other dud Squarepusher album was at least adventurous (especially so actually) but this seems easy and like he's perhaps trying to please a few listeners too many.

'Plug Me In' is the opening track and the first of several ventures into slick R'n'B, with possibly the album's best use of the robotic vocoder, I can't help but love it, 'Abstract Lover' is a similarly pleasant pure cyber R'n'B track. 'Endless Night' is where Pusher throws a curveball into this new style of his, it begins with a great bassline (although sadly one of the few great bass moments of this album), then threaded through the peice are sections that fuse thumping apocalyptic metal with R'n'B vocals, interesting, still not quite a masterpeice but the closest thing D'Demonstaror has.

'Laser Rock' is a bit lame and 'Maximum Planck' is utterly dire (if you want to hear Squarepusher in metal mode I suggest you try the vastly superior 'Steinbolt' from 'Ultravisitor' or 'Delta V' from 'Just a Souvenir'), it pains me to say that about anything Squarepusher's done but they are beyond let downs.

'Megazine' of all the album's tracks this is the one probably most responsible for all the horrible Daft Punk comparisons but it's better, it's a stomping neo-dance-rock tune, with the most tongue in cheek metal inspired/piss taking bass solo you'll ever hear, I do and don't like it, I also do and don't want to like it, alot like D'demonstrator as a whole. 'Into the Blue' is a good, dark, moody, quirky tune with some nice chunky basslines. 'Frisco Wave' is a joyously cheesy, smooth, jazz funk instrumental, reminiscent of tracks like 'Bubble Life', 'Theme from Sprite' or maybe one of the 'Star Time' tracks. 'Cryptic Motion' is a respectable single, funky basslines and beautiful melodies that linger in the background, solid track, although it feels like a simplistic pop refinement of previous tones rather than an exciting new experiement with a life of it's own, a problem across the board on D'demonstrator.

I'll check out his next release to see if Squarepusher returns to form but in the meantime this album will be spending alot of lonesome time on the shelf whilst 'Hard Normal Daddy', 'Go Plastic', 'Music is Rotted' etc. carry on jamming on the turntable.
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1.0 out of 5 stars One of Squarepusher's finest drunken moments., 1 Oct 2012
By 
Christian Lowensprung (TRONDHEIM Norway) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: d'Demonstrator (Audio CD)
I can't believe that this album is made by the same dude that made Ufabulum. The cover is nice. The CD however sounds like somebody who's made music while drunk, close to it, or maybe even worse. The singing is abysmal, and the music is half hearted at best. Actually, I'd never actually thought I'd say this, being a fan of Squarepusher that I am. But ehem, "Squarepusher, this sucks man!!" The whole album sounds like songs released in their demo state. If the artist name was by some unknown electronica artist called"Drunken Bastard", then I'd maybe not trash this album as I am now doing. But from Squarepusher I expect better than this. The past "Go Plastic" and the present "Ufabulum" are both outstanding pieces of art. So why this drivel was even released as an album and stamped as being from the one and only Squarepusher, is beyond me. Enough said, avoid this album at all costs!
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5.0 out of 5 stars remember when you were driving through a long tunnel, 3 Sep 2012
By 
Mr. R. Moss - See all my reviews
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This review is from: d'Demonstrator (Audio CD)
i don't think of daft punk when i listen to this. the thing this record makes me think of most is frankie goes to hollywood - the feeling of listening to frankie goes to hollywood in the back of a ford granada on the motorway at night as a kid. this is a deeply misleading and unhelpful connection to make, though, so i will have to explain myself. this record has the same sort of vision of the future as a dimly remembered nightmare, like reverse hauntology or something, that trevor horn stuff like frankie and buggles did in the 80s. remember that people were worried in the 80s, and they're worried now. remember the thrill of concrete and street-light and the rear window heater wires. remember the fake wood panelling and the ashtray smell.
i guess he recruited an undisclosed death metal band to make this creepy metallic soul with the barely intelligible philosophical mutterings in the lyrics. it makes sense, you can hear ghostly whisperings mirroring the vocodered vocals. there are absurd tracks about abstract analogue-electronic sensuality, and music that speaks of dusty apartments at night, LED light transfiguring the dark like a drug. and there are tracks to sit in the back of an 80s car on the motorway by - that's "into the blue" and "frisco wave" in particular, which i think lots of people don't like or don't get because you sure wouldn't find them on your average electro record.
i don't really know how he ended up making this music. that's the miracle of art. but i listen to it a lot. i listen to it in my car.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Squarepusher please come back, 3 Dec 2010
This review is from: d'Demonstrator (Audio CD)
This cd is well produced and sounds nice but it just is not squarepusher, no madness, no skippy beats,and too much vocoder (i think he must be in love) any way like the previous review not bad but not brilliant.
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d'Demonstrator by Squarepusher (Audio CD - 2010)
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